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EBay Hears And Sees No Evil, It Just Sells It

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: EBay Hears And Sees No Evil, It Just Sells It
2. Today's Top Story
    - Hackers Circulate Exploit Code For Two Windows Flaws
    - FTC Study Concludes Masking, Filtering Stop Spammers
3. Breaking News
    - HP Launches Formal Utility-Computing Service
    - Firefox 1.5 Release Imminent
    - 'Cyber Monday' Actually Happened On Thanksgiving
    - Sarbanes-Oxley Compliance To Boost Tech Spending
    - Analyst Banks On Wireless, Comm Growth
    - Deadline Passes For VoIP Providers To Offer 911 Service
    - Seagate Uses Sony Tech In Tiny Disk Drive
    - HHS Needs To Improve Way It Manages IT Investments, GAO says
    - Gartner: 30% Of Homes To Be Cellular Or VoIP-Only
    - Firm To Commercialize Nanotechnologies
    - RFID Network Set To Launch In 2006
    - ICANN Considers Freeing Up Single-Letter Domains
4. In Depth: Windows' 20th Anniversary: Bloggers Sound Off
    - Two Decades Later, We Still Do Windows
    - Windows Forever
    - The Road Ahead
    - 20 Years Of Doing Windows
    - Happy Birthday, Windows
    - Two Decades
    - Microsoft Windows Live? Not Yet--And Maybe Not Ever
    - Why 'Windows Live' Ain't Dead Yet
5. Voice Of Authority
    - Mollifying Paper-Pushers Could Benefit Microsoft's Business Customers
6. White Papers
    - Sarbanes-Oxley Compliance
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day: Children
"Human beings are the only creatures that allow their children to come back home." --Bill Cosby

"Like its politicians and its wars, society has the teenagers it deserves." --J.B. Priestley


1. Editor's Note: EBay Hears And Sees No Evil, It Just Sells It

Is eBay Adam Smith's perfect market, where prices are set by the honest interaction of buyers and sellers and everyone goes home happy, or is it simply the perfect vehicle for price gouging--and much, much worse?

The short supply of Microsoft's Xbox 360 means the game system is fetching up to $1,000 on eBay. Fair enough. If gamesters really can't wait a few more weeks to play the 360 version of "Call of Duty 2" or "NBA Live 06," then it's their money, right? Sure, but eBay's willingness to turn a blind eye to scalping, copyright infringement, and the sale of questionable goods has a darker side that proved very convenient for a creep named Peter Braunstein.

Braunstein, of New York City, is a former fashion writer and playwright who's gone off the deep end in the worst way. On Halloween, he allegedly impersonated a firefighter to gain entry to a former co-worker's apartment. Inside, he's alleged to have used chloroform to render the woman unconscious. What followed was a series of sexual attacks that lasted more than 12 hours.

Braunstein, now a fugitive, got everything he needed to act out this sicko scenario on eBay because, after all, "Whatever it is, you can get it here." Or so the online auctioneer boasts. For Braunstein, "whatever it is" included the firefighting gear, law-enforcement badge, potassium nitrate, and chloroform that he allegedly used during the crime.

How does eBay get away with listing stuff that, in many cases, would be unobtainable from a brick-and-mortar store without proper credentials or a background check? The dubious goods often carry modifiers like "antique" or "replica" or, like the cop's badge, "vintage." Problem is, most of these things can be made to function or look like the real thing with minor modifications. You can read more about eBay's official policies versus what actually goes on at the site, and what I, and other readers, think should be done about it by going to my blog entry.

Paul McDougall
mailto:paulmcd@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Hackers Circulate Exploit Code For Two Windows Flaws
Microsoft is aware of both exploits but doesn't see a threat, even though two security organizations have recommended users take immediate action.

FTC Study Concludes Masking, Filtering Stop Spammers
Unmasked E-mail addresses received more than 6,400 spam messages, while only one spam message reached masked E-mail addresses. Masking is the practice of altering an E-mail address so that it's readable by people but not by machines.


3. Breaking News

HP Launches Formal Utility-Computing Service
Customers can buy access to basic IT infrastructure, including server, storage, network, operating system, and associated HP management tools, and pay per CPU hour.

Firefox 1.5 Release Imminent
The browser upgrade, which has been in beta since August and has gone through three release candidates this month, will be available for free download later Tuesday from the Mozilla site.

'Cyber Monday' Actually Happened On Thanksgiving
The online shopping crunch really happened on Thanksgiving night, according to one Web-metrics firm, with more sites experiencing peak loads at that point.

Sarbanes-Oxley Compliance To Boost Tech Spending
Companies will spend more on technology for Sarbox than on personnel so that compliance can "become repeatable," according to a new AMR report.

Analyst Banks On Wireless, Comm Growth
Robert Abbe, managing director at investment banking firm Jefferies Broadview, offers up his technology prognostications for the next few years.

Deadline Passes For VoIP Providers To Offer 911 Service
The FCC isn't saying what the penalties might be for companies that didn't meet Monday's deadline.

Seagate Uses Sony Tech In Tiny Disk Drive
The 1-inch drives are finding their way into mobile phones, camcorders, digital cameras, and MP3 players.

HHS Needs To Improve Way It Manages IT Investments, GAO Says
It's a critical problem, considering the department plans to spend more than $5 billion on IT this fiscal year to help manage 300-plus programs.

Gartner: 30% Of Homes To Be Cellular Or VoIP-Only
The trend is already well under way, the study said; in 2004, about 90% of all new telephone connections worldwide were mobile.

Firm To Commercialize Nanotechnologies
NanoDynamic's products, based on atomic clusters, will include a hydrogen sensor prototype and technology to produce precise conductive wire patterns.

RFID Network Set To Launch In 2006
Based on a Web-services model, the network will provide a central system of record for all enterprise electronic product code-related RFID data by aggregating events from multiple technology platforms.

ICANN Considers Freeing Up Single-Letter Domains
Names like "a.com" might become hot commodities, leading to a new online real-estate rush.

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------ The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Unstructured Content
With the surge of blogs, E-mail, and other unstructured content, many companies are evaluating enterprise content-management strategies, according to this recent InformationWeek Research report, Enterprise Content Management.

Ready For A Raise?
Should you get a raise in 2006? Learn how your pay compares to that of your peers with our free and confidential online tool. Featuring more than 20 job functions and tracking IT compensation across 20 metropolitan areas, InformationWeek Research's 2005 IT Salary Adviser makes it easy to compare your salary and compensation.

A Week's Worth Of Dailies--All In One Place
Have you missed an issue or two of the InformationWeek Daily? Or want to check out some recent quotes of the day? Check out our Daily newsletter archive page and get caught up quickly.

-----------------------------------------


4. In Depth: Windows' 20th Anniversary: Bloggers Sound Off

Two Decades Later, We Still Do Windows
Mitch Irsfeld, Messaging Pipeline: "There are few bits and bytes getting passed around today that don't pass through a Windows-based system somewhere along the way. And I suspect that might not change over the next 20 years."

Windows Forever
Amy Larsen DeCarlo, Systems Management Pipeline: "Happy anniversary, Windows. As challenging as my own relationship has been at times with you, in the long run, you've done more good than I would like to admit."

The Road Ahead
Matt McKenzie, Linux Pipeline: "If Windows expects to survive another 20 years, much less to thrive and to stay relevant, its guardians must learn to find their way in a business world where that old, familiar-looking road is likely to lead them straight off a cliff."

20 Years Of Doing Windows
David DeJean, Desktop Pipeline: "By September 1986, Windows had been in release for almost a year, and it was still a laboratory curiosity."

Happy Birthday, Windows
Antone Gonsalves, InternetWeek: "Despite its past glory, the operating system's dominance is threatened in an Internet-connected world, and Gates & Co. will have to innovate to keep Windows relevant."

Two Decades
Don St. John, Server Pipeline: "Honestly, in a server world populated with big iron running proprietary systems, Microsoft was the last company anyone thought would create the dominant server platform of 2005."

Microsoft Windows Live? Not Yet--And Maybe Not Ever
Mitch Wagner, InformationWeek: "So far, the Live initiative is a big ol' bucket of vaporware, combined with technology, products, and service that were already available or announced quite some time ago and are just being repackaged."

Why 'Windows Live' Ain't Dead Yet
John Foley, InformationWeek: "Windows and Office may be 20-year-old software dinosaurs, but they also give Microsoft a huge footprint, with something like 600 million Windows PCs worldwide. Think of those PCs as 600 million pairs of open arms just waiting to catch whatever Microsoft throws their way."


5. Voice Of Authority

Mollifying Paper-Pushers Could Benefit Microsoft's Business Customers
Microsoft never relinquishes control easily; but this time, it buckled under to the bureaucrats. But the decisions it made related to its upcoming Office 12 suite should help customers, particularly those that want to customize Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Aaron Ricadela explains why.


6. White Papers

The Forrester Wave: Sarbanes-Oxley Compliance Software, 1Q 2005 Analyst Report
Sarbanes-Oxley compliance is a rapidly maturing software category that combines enterprise content management, analytics, and enterprise applications.


------- Webcasts -----------------------
An IT Architect Vendor Perspectives TechWebCast-- Open for Business: The Service-Oriented Enterprise
Date: Wednesday, Dec. 7
Time: 9 a.m. PT / 11 a.m. CT / Noon ET

In this informative TechWebCast, Capgemini will outline its strategy for transforming companies into agile service-oriented enterprises, including a close collaboration with Oracle and HP to implement SOE for joint customers.
-----------------------------------------


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