Healthcare // Analytics
News
7/22/2014
07:06 AM
David Wagner
David Wagner
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail

10 More Robots That Could Change Healthcare

These medical robots bring fresh ideas to healthcare. Ready to see one at your local hospital?
1 of 12

1 of 12
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
David F. Carr
100%
0%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 9:33:10 AM
Where's the paperwork robot?
The doctors I know would be happy with a robot that deals with insurance companies and the government. Instead, you give us barfing robots?
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 12:10:51 PM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
Well, I don't think it takes a robot (perhaps a computer, more likely an assistant) to deal with insurance companies. The point of the barfing robot is to track the way norovirus spreads. Which literally saves lives.

All an insurance robot saves doctors is a headache. 

 
tjgkg
100%
0%
tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 9:55:04 AM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
The insurance robot would probably melt from not only the paperwork but the changing requirements and regulations. I could see each day starting out with an update.
StaceyE
50%
50%
StaceyE,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2014 | 11:22:06 AM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
@ David

The barfing robot sounds intriguing...I guess the benefits would outweigh the sheer grossness of it... ;)
Susan_Nunziata
0%
100%
Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 12:52:21 PM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
@David F. Carr: Does that paperwork robot actually exist? If so, please tell us more about it.
batye
0%
100%
batye,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 1:08:22 PM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
interesting, same question here, would love to know more... thanks... sometime it seems technology changing overnight...
Angelfuego
100%
0%
Angelfuego,
User Rank: Moderator
7/22/2014 | 1:08:25 PM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
I do not feel too comfortable with this idea as of yet. However, maybe it will really be a good thing in the future. Maybe it's possible that robots can do more than humans. Since the humans will be remotely controlling the robots, I think the doctors need a lot more training in this area before they fully roll out having the robots perform procedures on us.
Sara Peters
100%
0%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 1:14:04 PM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
@DavidCarr @DavidWagner   I actually think the barfing robot could be really useful, but I'm more interested in the therapy robots with the sensors that might be able to measure a patient's pain level. Palliative care is one of the things that medical professionals struggle most with, because it's so hard to determine who's silently toughing it out and who's complaining about excruciating pain just to persuade the doctors to give them more morphine.
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:19:42 PM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
@Sara- Yes, i think the therapy robot is amazing. Having just gone through therapy for a knee injury, I can tell you that the gentle and experienced hands of a therapist were amazing. But there aren't enough of them. And I had toruble getting appointments.

If we could replicate some of that experience, it could do wonders. Especially if we could combine the human touch with the robots ability to work tirelessly.
David F. Carr
100%
0%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 1:20:02 PM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
@SaraPeters, I missed the detail about pain sensors in the therapy robot - does that tech already exist? I wonder how reliable it is, what the advantage is over self-reported pain indicators.Is that really something that can be measured objectively?
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:36:39 PM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
@DavidCarr- My understanding is that right now, we measure pain through secondary reactions (called galvanic skin reactions). We can measure stress through these reactions. If you isolate and/or create baselines for other forms of stress, you can see pain as one of the things that cause this reaction.

And in 2013, neuroscientists from Johns Hopkins (my alma mater, shameless plug) and University of Michigan used Functional MRI to measure pain on an objective scale. http://io9.com/scientists-succeed-in-objectively-measuring-pain-472456061

Functional MRI right now requires a very large device so it wouldn't be practical in a machine like this yet. But galvanic skin reactions, combined with a patient's resistance to the exoskeleton, audio cues, etc could go a long way.
Henrisha
100%
0%
Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:39:00 PM
Re: Where's the paperwork robot?
I suppose they must have come up with measurable metrics to assess the pain level. From what I've heard, it is still relatively new so it might take some time before it will be reliable enough to expand its reach of applications.
Sara Peters
100%
0%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 1:09:51 PM
Obligatory Def Leppard reference
Well that Meka Robotics arm for the one-armed drummer is pretty cool, but I wonder how Rick Allen of Def Leppard would feel about it?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UIB9Y4OFPs
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:16:40 PM
Re: Obligatory Def Leppard reference
@Sara- I wondered that, too. I believe he uses a combination of other technologies to do similar things. I believe he uses electronic drums that sometimes repeat and capture his rhythms so he can play other parts. I think i remember him saying that he can set it up to do more than he could have before his accident. But obviously, he has to program it.

the difference is the improvisaitonal aspect of the 3rd stick. I'd love to hear what he could do with it. I bet he'd love to try it out.
soozyg
100%
0%
soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 1:18:32 PM
Kernerworks
My favorite is the Kernerworks training bot. All the things it can simulate? With that training, medics would make fewer mistakes in the field and save more lives. That is excellent.
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:26:35 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@soozyg- Yes, that was amazing. the hardest part for me was recognizing how many people need training on multiple amputation traumas. I would rather like to ignore that part of life when I can. Thankfully, there are people (and now robot engineers) that have more guts than me.

the best thing about this is that in the long run it should be programmable for more types of trauma so the training will get even better. I think the hard part for these training robots right now is how do you "transform" easily from a robot with no legs to one with legs but a sucking chest wound. things like that.
soozyg
100%
0%
soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 1:37:21 PM
Re: Kernerworks
That is really cool. Well, in the best world--or at least an improved world--the robots would just be reassemble-able. Or they would come with replaceable body parts.

For favorite it was a tough choice between the trauma robot and the robot maggots. I know they eat tumors and I think that is totally cool. Robot maggots would be really cool to see.
Henrisha
0%
100%
Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:39:38 PM
Re: Kernerworks
I'm with you, the Kernerworks would definitely make an impact in healthcare. The training it facilitates is invaluable, considering that it bsaically teaches people to save lives.
vnewman2
100%
0%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 2:43:12 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@soozyg - I am with you on this one - by far my favorite.  I worked as a lifeguard for about 10 years as a teenager and college student into my early 20s.  I've taken all types of first aid, CPR, and lifesaving classes, held every related certification and taken every necessary training class.  Let me just tell you - the training situations were NOTHING like what actually happened when someone was really drowning.  Nothing at all.  I'm sure the same is the case for trauma training - the closer you can get to real life simulations the better because preparation is EVERYTHING.
vnewman2
IW Pick
50%
50%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 2:54:53 PM
Re: Kernerworks
Re the EXOSKELETON.  3 words.  Sigourney Weaver.  Aliens.

Way cool.
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 3:06:49 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@vnewman2- Wow, that's fascinating. Without bringing up anything too horrific or traumatizing for you, could you be more specific on how they are different? I'd love ot know what, if anything, robots could do to fill in those gaps.
sferguson10001
100%
0%
sferguson10001,
User Rank: Moderator
7/22/2014 | 3:20:08 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@Dave: A lot of interesting stuff here, and it's good to see that some of the bigger institutions are investing in and experimenting with these robot designs. The other day, an MIT grad student posted news about a robot that has the same range of motion as the human wrist and hand. However, one question, we talk about a $4 billion or so market in a few years, but what part of the medical field stands to benefit the most? Is there a particular area more open to this technology? It would seem that robots can benefit those with severe injuries more, but maybe you have a different take?
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 5:00:33 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@sferguson10001- It depends on your definition of "robot." The robot numbers include telepresence and robotic surgery devices. Telepresence is where the most money is being spent. Finding a way to expand the time on task for staff is the number one goal. The more you can keep them from travelling or doing mundane tasks they are overqualified for the more ROI you get. 

Right now that means mostly telepresence, but it will soon mean dedicated devices like RIBA. Though as great as RIBA is, we have to wonder whether some sort of altered bed with a gentle lifting mechanism makes more sense than a robot. But you get what I mean.

the other big area I think we're going to see expand is training like the trauma robot and the haptic device that teaches breast manipulation. That can be easily dismissed as a novelty, but hands on time for students is a big deal. And it is demeaning to ask a woman to submit to an entire class of students touching her to get experience.
vnewman2
100%
0%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 3:33:00 PM
Re: Kernerworks
Absolutely David. I'm glad to share. Most folks have no idea and only know what they have seen in the movies. The reality is much more sobering. Here are some points as outlined by SLATE.COM and demonstrated in this video courtesy of Mario Vittone: The Instinctive Drowning Response

 

"1. Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help.  The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled before speech occurs. Drowning people's mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people's mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.

2. Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water's surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.


3. Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.


4. From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people's bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs."
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 5:13:59 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@vnewman- Wow, that is a great description. I knew some of out ideas of drowing were wrong, but that really put it into ghastly perspective.

I've seen our local water park do drills where they put dummies floating in the water or hide them in nooks and crannies on rides to see if the lifeguards spot them. Is that good training? Have you seen that?

And could we up that a notch or two by doing that with a robot that could position itself or move like a drowning person?
vnewman2
100%
0%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 6:23:33 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@David - although I think the dummies are good for drawing the guard's eye to a body in the water, nothing can replace a moving, seemingly live drowning victim.  So, IMO, 

"Could we up that a notch or two by doing that with a robot that could position itself or move like a drowning person?"

Definitely.  That would be a stellar idea.

In the 10 years of my lifeguard career I only saw one drowning fatality (wish I could say none but...) and it was in a huge community pool with hundreds of people around.  No one saw or heard anything.  Not the guards, not any of the swimmers.

An 8-year-old boy was left by his parents with his 13-year-old brother at the pool while they were visiting from out of town.  The boy didn't know how to swim.  The brother left to go to the pizza place to go play video games.  The boy apparently jumped off the diving board into 12 feet of water and never surfaced.  We surmised he hit his head or just couldn't make it up in time to breathe.  I was guarding the baby pool at the time and remember seeing the head guard fishing his body from the water after his brother came back looking for him and could not find him.

Simply tragic.

 
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/23/2014 | 6:31:04 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@vnewman2- Thanks for the insights and sharing your experience. I'm thinking i want to make a drowing robot simulator in my spare time now. Seems like the kind of simple but transformative idea healthcare needs.
soozyg
100%
0%
soozyg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 3:24:06 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@Vnewman2 very interesting.

Actually, funny...the same thing happened with childbirth. I took those silly Lamaze classes and read all kinds of books and all of it went out the window during delivery. I started with the special breathing and my OB said, "Uh uh. No. Don't breathe like that, it doesn't help at all. Breathe like this." All those classes went right out the window. (sigh).
David Wagner
0%
100%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 5:07:58 PM
Re: Kernerworks
Breathe like this

Ha! I suspect that the OB was just annoyed by the way you were breathing. I think the number one goal of the breath is to give you something else to think about. :)

No, I'm not breathing expert, but I'm amused. 

cafzali
100%
0%
cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/22/2014 | 1:19:25 PM
nifty, but not likely
Health care has always been one of those areas where what you experience depends vastly on where you live. If you're in a major metro area and have access to a top-tier facility, you'll see these trends come to you much sooner than if you're in a rural area, or even a small city, with no access to top-flight medical care. 

Hospitals in major metro areas can afford this technology, in large part because they receive grants, have endowments, etc. In contrast, smaller hospitals do well to stay open because they have to take everyone who comes in the door, serve a greater percentage of people who lack access to preventative health care, etc. 

I'm all for technology, but the first thing that needs to change in health care is the business model. The current financing method works for nobody and is bankrupting the economy. 
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:38:43 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@cafzali- A very fair point on whether you'll see robots in a hospital near you any time soon. It is true that urban research hospitals tend to get all the fun first.

Still, I think there is a place for robots and telemdeicine in more rural areas. For isntance, the RIBA seems more likely to be useful in place where the population is small and there are fewer people in the workforce to help with care.
glenbren
50%
50%
glenbren,
User Rank: Moderator
7/22/2014 | 2:04:31 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
 I think there is a place for robots and telemdeicine in more rural areas. For isntance, the RIBA seems more likely to be useful in place where the population is small and there are fewer people in the workforce to help with care.

Not sure rural area hospitals could afford such robots. My favorites were the maggot types. Pretty icky, but better, if it worked, than any alternative we have now.
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 3:03:35 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@glenbren- Costs of robots are coming down. Unfortunately, I don't know the cost of the RIBA, but the Jibo is just $400. that seems nearly impossible 10 years ago. I think the key to making them cost effective is to free up highly trained people from mundane tasks. Every time you have a nurse or therapist helping lift a patient to change their lines, that's time they aren't spending on the stuff that robots can't do.
Alison_Diana
100%
0%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 3:43:20 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
And more nurses who don't spend their retirement suffering from back pain! (My best friend's mom was a private duty nurse for years; she suffers terribly from a bad back, thanks to all the lifting she did over the years.)
cafzali
100%
0%
cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/22/2014 | 2:06:50 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Dave Telemedicine -- definitely. This is one of those areas where we've sort of missed the boat in terms of quality of care for rural patients and reducing costs. In actuality, there are many small areas that would be better served with a higher quality emergency room and transportation options to better facilities rather than operating an acute care hospital. 

But hospitals are one of those "third rails" of local politics. Nobody wants to lose their local hospital, but the economics of operating one is very difficult. Telemedicine would allow consults with specialists who would not otherwise travel there, you could replace in person folow up visits with them, etc. In reality, there's probably more potential to do real things in this area in medicine than there is in education. 
Alison_Diana
100%
0%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 3:20:25 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
I am a huge advocate for telemedicine for everywhere, from rural regions to busy cities. I agree that areas don't want to lose their hospitals -- and they don't have to -- but alll the stats show we're going to run out of general practitioners (even if nurse practitioner rules are loosened) and some places (like inner cities and rural regions) will be even more under-served. Estimates vary, but figure that at least 25-33% (or even more) of cases could be easily dealt with via a phone, video, or instant message consultation with a remote clinician and that decrease in clinicians would hurt less. Plus some physicians would work part-time instead of retiring since they could work from anywhere. As one doctor told me, all she needs is her laptop and her lab coat and she's ready to work as a full-time telehealth physician.
cafzali
100%
0%
cafzali,
User Rank: Moderator
7/22/2014 | 3:31:35 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Alison A likely stumbling block to increased adoption would be insurance reimbursements for telemedicine consultations. I see this as a much bigger issue for rural residents than urban areas unless by urban you mean cities with high rates of poverty. Most cities have the best medical care in the country -- at least from an access standpoint. The stickler is whether or not people have the ability to pay for it. And now with the legality of the certain ACA provisions being called into place, this could get sticky until resolved by the Supreme Court. 

To me, we need to start thinking about health care as an issue that's primarily economic because the jury's in -- we can't afford the current system we have now. The question is what are we going to do about it that will help us become more competitive. 
Alison_Diana
100%
0%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 3:41:16 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
Reimbursement is a big issue. Some employers or payers are encouraging telemedicine by reducing the co-payment (sometimes to $0); of course it helps employers since employees no longer have to take time off to see the doctor, but insurance premiums for telemedicine can be lower than in-office visits. Some insurance companies now offer telemedicine as a lower-cost option to in-person visits and an alternative offering for clients (the employers). And more healthcare systems are partnering with telemed providers (like an American Well) to OEM telehealth services staffed either entirely by their clinicians or in part (perhaps augmented on weekends/holidays/ nights). 

Yes, with cities I was referring to inner cities with high rates of poverty where private practices might not want to set up and free clinics typically are overworked and underfunded. Given the stats I've read separately on the overall population's adoption of cell phones, it seems most people do have cell phones - and many have smartphones, at least in the US - so a good percentage would be able to use telemedicine. Verizon even has a telemedicine offering -- Virtual Visits; perhaps there's even a way of working with local government health agencies so those calls are free for those receiving government aid?
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 5:10:49 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@cafzali- i was at a presentaiton at HIMSS about the very topic of insurance and telemedicine. And for what it was worth, they did an informal show of hands in the room. They asked doctors if they would do a telemedicine consult even if they new that they wouldn't get paid by the insurance. Nearly all of them raised their hands saying they would. When they asked if they would do 2 per day (10 per week) without getitng paid, most raised their hands. Above that number, the hands started going down. 

So at the very least the technology is considered useful enough that doctors aren't going to worry about it here or there. It is if insurance simply never adapts that they will get cranky.
Alison_Diana
100%
0%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 5:15:51 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
That is interesting, Dave. We're already seeing more doctors becoming hospital staff as they get fed up with dealing with the changes from government, insurers, etc. As i mentioned in another comment, I think we'll also see some doctors forego the higher fees they might get from private practice if it means they can work x-hour shifts on regular days that fit into their personal life -- perhaps around a spouse's or child's schedule, as part of retirement, or other choice -- and work for telemed companies, be they providers or healthcare systems that set up telemed solutions.
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 5:03:03 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Alison- I think that's great. The one thing i worry about with telemedicine is that despite best intentions it will create two classes of medicine-- the people who can afford to be seen in perosn and the people who only get robots.

i know the argument for telepresence is that it means a world class specialist can see someon anywhere in the world. But they are still only seeing the robot. I worry that we will inadvertantly create a kind of ghetto robot medicine.
Alison_Diana
100%
0%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 5:12:31 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
Hmmm, i doubt it, although I suppose that's a risk. Seems to me there are clearcut cases where telemedicine works and there are clearcut places where it doesn't (where blood's involved!). As someone else mentioned here, there are also politics, jobs, and other reasons why hospitals won't go away; telemed complements existing care but i don't foresee it ever supplanting in-office (or OR) visits when face-to-face care is necessary. Although sci-fi writers would disagree, i'm sure!
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 5:20:41 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Alison- Fair enough. I guess my recent experience with my knee injury has colored my opinions. The doctors who touched my knee got the diagnosis right. The ones that read the MRI but never touched me, got it wrong. But that may be a small sample size aberation.
Broadway0474
100%
0%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 11:33:48 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
David, were the MRI readers in another country? A lot of radiology is outsourced these days to India or Australia, so that while we all sleep, your X-Ray is being analyzed by someone thousands of miles away and an assessment is ready by morning East Coast time.
Gigi3
100%
0%
Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 2:53:09 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
"were the MRI readers in another country? A lot of radiology is outsourced these days to India or Australia, so that while we all sleep, your X-Ray is being analyzed by someone thousands of miles away and an assessment is ready by morning East Coast time."

Broadway, that's the advantage of technology and connectivity. They can have the result at a low cost too; but may not happen at real time scenario because of the difference in time frame.
Ashu001
100%
0%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:31:07 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Gigi-Quite right!

A lot of this outsourcing is getting very controversial today because of the Lack of Privacy regulations or non-compatibility of them in those other countries(where the Medical Reports are outsourced).

It also does'nt help that these are relatively well paying jobs back in US & Europe today and with increasing amount of Unemployment here they tend to raise all kinds of Anti-Outsourcing Backlash.

Regards

Ashish.

 
Gigi3
100%
0%
Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2014 | 2:15:54 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
"It also does'nt help that these are relatively well paying jobs back in US & Europe today and with increasing amount of Unemployment here they tend to raise all kinds of Anti-Outsourcing Backlash."

Asish, you are right.
nomii
100%
0%
nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:38:41 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Gigi absolutely. I think advantage of tech invreases many folds by having video conferencing. I think it can be used as a tool to carry out specialized operations with consent of specialists sitting thousands of mile away in a time sensitive case. I hope robots will be a major way forward in case of extremely sensitive cases.
Gigi3
100%
0%
Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2014 | 2:17:11 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
"absolutely. I think advantage of tech invreases many folds by having video conferencing. I think it can be used as a tool to carry out specialized operations with consent of specialists sitting thousands of mile away in a time sensitive case. I hope robots will be a major way forward in case of extremely sensitive"

Nomii, telemedicine is very common in under developing countries due to the lack of specialists. This will help for that.
nomii
50%
50%
nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
8/4/2014 | 2:35:27 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Gigi I agree but rhere is still room for way forward. I believe that people in the under developed countries are not much aware of its benefits and need to be taken a board. I believe that the tech developed should be for the purpose of human development not destruction.
Gigi3
100%
0%
Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
8/7/2014 | 12:09:24 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
"I agree but rhere is still room for way forward. I believe that people in the under developed countries are not much aware of its benefits and need to be taken a board. I believe that the tech developed should be for the purpose of human development not destruction."

Nomii, yes you are right and agreed. Such initiatives have to be address at government level because infrastructure developments are carrying out at various government level departments.
nomii
50%
50%
nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
8/8/2014 | 10:28:39 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Gigi I believe that human development are purposefully kept in a dark in some areas. I believe that tech is right of every individual and it should be developed with that basic premise in mind.
Gigi3
100%
0%
Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2014 | 12:34:49 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
"I believe that human development are purposefully kept in a dark in some areas. I believe that tech is right of every individual and it should be developed with that basic premise in mind."

Nomii, tech is right of every individual, no doubt about that. am not getting what you meant by "I believe that human development are purposefully kept in a dark in some areas"
nomii
50%
50%
nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
8/11/2014 | 12:52:30 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Gigi sorry for not clearing my point. It was actually written in context with some areas in our country where few influentials devoid others of this right.
Gigi3
100%
0%
Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
8/13/2014 | 1:59:55 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
"sorry for not clearing my point. It was actually written in context with some areas in our country where few influentials devoid others of this right."

Nomii, thanks for the clarification.
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/23/2014 | 6:35:47 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@broadway0474- I don't want to name names, but the doctor who relied on my MRI and never touched my leg saw me in person. He is also the team physician of a major college sports team, and has quite a reputation as an orthopediac surgeon. Personally, I don't think he misdiagnosed me because he was incapable, but because he was indifferent. In two appointments, he spent a grand total of 7 minutes with me.

At one point he tossed me my own MRI and said, "read 'em and weep." And then he told me I'd have to avoid any activity for 9 months. Without going into more boring details, i was back on a softball field in 6 weeks, and it is not only 5 months and I'm back to running multiple miles a day.

I don't personally care where my doctor is if he takes the time to care.
Broadway0474
50%
50%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 11:09:37 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@David, that is a horrible story. I would fully support you if you wanted to start naming names. There's been a big push toward "consumer-directed" healthcare, and if that ever actually happens, jerky docs like this will eventually have their reps, and their busineses, dented,
Ashu001
0%
100%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:33:49 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@David-Good points!

Practical experience always beats analysts who just read reports.

Regards

Ashish.
nomii
0%
100%
nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:40:40 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Ashish agree with you there. But in cases where practical experience is not available we need to depend on theoraticalexperience. Many atimes experimental analysis are just as actual contigency.
jastroff
100%
0%
jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 3:31:57 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@dave -- I like them all, so I can't just pick one to vote for. They strike me as something out of a Stanley Kurbick movie from 20 years ago -- which means, they were ahead of their time then, and their time has arrived now. Costs will come down, and we will see them in more places that we didn't expect. I don't have a doctor now who doesn't have a computer for records and reference. When I saw my first mainframe in 1978, I wouldn't have thought it would migrate to anyone's desk.
tzubair
100%
0%
tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 3:49:01 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
"Still, I think there is a place for robots and telemdeicine in more rural areas. For isntance, the RIBA seems more likely to be useful in place where the population is small and there are fewer people in the workforce to help with care."

@David: I do agree that these robots will have a useful application in the rural areas, however my only concern is about the maintenance of these robots. You also need skilled professionals to ensure the proper running of these robots and troubleshooting if required. These resources are difficult to find in rural areas.
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 5:15:59 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@tzubair- Fair point on maintenence. I would hope you could around that by having some sort of shipping program where you send bad ones back on trucks and are replace dby good ones. But yes, it adds expense that has to be accounted for.
Henrisha
100%
0%
Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 1:40:50 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
Aside from hospitals, I see the robot being useful in training centers and schools, too. It's where healthcare workers-to-be receive primary training, after all. I am hoping partnerships between larger and small hospitals will form in order to make this technology more accsesible.
impactnow
100%
0%
impactnow,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 1:54:21 PM
Robot better than I thought!

Dave I liked these robots more than I thought--the maggot robot I could have done without. Brain cancer or maggot in your head it could be a decision for some. I especially liked the robot that soothed patients so many in the medical area are time stresses and don't have time to provide patients with these soft variables that really make a medical experience positive or negative. I also liked the vein robot since I always have a bruised arm after a blood draw because a vein can't be found!

David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 3:01:24 PM
Re: Robot better than I thought!
@imapctnow- At least you know the robot maggot will leave your brain when it is done. :)

and you are right about the blood draw robot. I think this one is eaisly underestimated. Not only in terms of time savings but pain savings. Teaching a robot to do this right, pain-free, the first time, every time will make a huge difference to quality of care.
Alison_Diana
100%
0%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 3:22:09 PM
The Da Vinci Dilemma
One question, too: There have been lawsuits around da Vinci robots and, while I'm not an attorney or a specialist in robots, I wonder whether those suits will stultify some healthcare organizations' interest in using robots, at least in the OR or around patients? 
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 5:05:52 PM
Re: The Da Vinci Dilemma
@Alison- I wonder about that, too. I suspect it will probably focus the efforts a bit which isn't a bad thing. One of the things about robots in surgery is that they are just plain cool. But they aren't necessarily fot for every surgery. I think the lawsuits are making people do a better job at figuring out the right place for them. They aren't going to go away, no more than malpractice suits keep people from being doctors.
Alison_Diana
100%
0%
Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
7/22/2014 | 5:13:33 PM
Re: The Da Vinci Dilemma
True. And you can be a bad surgeon with or without a robot. Or a great one.
progman2000
100%
0%
progman2000,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 4:02:13 PM
That therapy robot is cool...
And since I'm in physical therapy a couple of times a month for my laundry list of sports injuries, I consider myself a connoisseur of physical therapy techniques.  And like most things I'm sure it won't be covered under my health insurance... 
mejiac
100%
0%
mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 4:38:27 PM
New Frontier or Twilight Zone?
Hey Dave,

Very informative article,

I will say that I've always tought that the effort involve in human care is something that robots couldn't replace, but the break down you've provided actually does help, I mean when we thinkg about it, a robot that helps patient calm down won't be fatigued, tired or in a bad mood, so in that aspect it does add value. I would appreciate it if it was tasked to take care of my kids.

Others I definitly see the educational values...others are simply too creepy (bugs in my brain? Really?)

But, I think that with more researh and development, we'll definitly get there. Movies like Elysium provide a preview of what will it looks like when medical attention is put in the hands of robots.
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/22/2014 | 5:18:12 PM
Re: New Frontier or Twilight Zone?
Others I definitly see the educational values...others are simply too creepy (bugs in my brain? Really?)


I thought that too, then I reminded my self that the alternative is to have them cut off the top of my skull, use retractors or scalpels to isolate the part of my brain where the tumor is, cut that tumor out with a knife and put my head back on. :)
mejiac
50%
50%
mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 3:36:40 PM
Re: New Frontier or Twilight Zone?
@David,

 

In that case, bring on the chocolate covered laser bugs :)
Technocrati
0%
100%
Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
7/22/2014 | 8:59:00 PM
A Good Use of Robotics

It is really encouraging to see the use of robots in hospitals.  I think healthcare is a great sector to really make advances in the use of robotics.  

The fun uses of robotics is well documented,  but within HealthCare - robots can make a real difference.

SaneIT
100%
0%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 7:37:52 AM
Creepy but cool
As creepy as a maggot bot sounds, the ability to make a tiny robot that can move through delicate parts of the body to reach a tumor and destroy it is an amazing concept.  This isn't just great for brain tumors, it would be amazing for any tumor if they can get the bot into the tumor and cause minimal damage in the process.  Imagine doctors not having to cut giant holes in people to get to tumors destroying nerves and blood supplies in the process.  This seems like the ultimate in targeted treatment.  

 

I'm also a bit surprised you didn't mention the sperm extraction bot that was all over the tech sites about a month ago. 
PedroGonzales
100%
0%
PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 10:40:43 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
I think the robot that will be make the greater difference will be the robot that grows hair for men.  Although, baldness is not a disease that kills people. Many men for centuries are trying to get their hair back.  If the robot is successfull and can go to the market.  I have a a feeling that it will become the number one robot on the planet.
Ashu001
0%
100%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:23:14 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@Pedro-You have a most brilliant! Brilliant Suggestion here!!!

Baldness is a very-very serious problem in a large number of men today.

Any move to solve it will go a long-long way towards helping men re-gain their self-esteem.

Good One!

Regards

Ashish.
SaneIT
100%
0%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 7:05:45 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@PedroGonzales, good news, it won't take robots to re-grow hair.  Recently an arthritis drug ( tofacitinib citrate) has been shown to reverse alopecia.  Much less invasive than a robot hair farmer running on your scalp.
PedroGonzales
100%
0%
PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 10:01:02 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@SaneIt. that is fantastic.  I have a cousin whom is trying to find various ways to save his hair.  He told me there is one pill on the market but it cost him $300 a bottle.  He told me that the majority of pills just slow process, but can't get the hair to grow back.  If the robot can farm your new hair is a small price to pay for hair.  Even some women suffer from baldness as well.
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 7:32:57 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@PedroGonzales, it does amaze me where we will put our money, but I guess hair on top of the head is one of the more visible conditions out there that a lot of people experience.  It seems to be one of those things that we can kind of help but can't totally fix, like the common cold.  I'm sure if a robot came along that could farm hair and implant it the money for funding would appear rather quickly.
tjgkg
100%
0%
tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 9:38:30 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
They will probably find the gene responsible for baldness and modify it before they get a robot to cure it. They also found the gene for grey hair so soon Just For Men and Clairol could be out of business.
Ashu001
0%
100%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:27:34 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@SaneIT-We already have such Micro-bots available at most Advanced Hospitals[Atleast for Research];They do a really-really good at surgery today.

I am sure this Maggot-Bot will also feed off the very same concept.

Regards

Ashish.

 
SaneIT
100%
0%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 7:03:05 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@Ashu001, I'm aware of much larger surgical robots but nothing the size of a maggot.  The closest to that I've seen is a camera swallowed to view the lower GI tract.  I think something the size of a grain of rice moving through the body to remove tumors is a big leap from a robotic arm that can cauterize.
Ashu001
50%
50%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 11:09:00 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
 

@SaneIT,

Don't worry about it.

The rate at which Devices are getting minitiarized today something similar will eventually become a reality.

What I was wondering though was whether these robots will be 100% Automatic or will operate essentially under Human Guidance?

You would need loads and loads of AI & Processing Power for a 100% automatic version would be HUGE!!!

 
Ashu001
50%
50%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 11:13:58 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
 

@SaneIT,

Don't worry about it.

The rate at which Devices are getting minitiarized today something similar will eventually become a reality.

What I was wondering though was whether these robots will be 100% Automatic or will operate essentially under Human Guidance?

You would need loads and loads of AI & Processing Power for a 100% automatic version would be HUGE!!!

 
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/23/2014 | 6:37:21 PM
Re: Creepy but cool
@SaneIt- Somehow i missed the sperm extractor. Do share with us when you get a chance.
SaneIT
100%
0%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 7:13:09 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@David, only because you asked it's not new technology, I rememer seeing this on tech sites a few years ago but now there is a hospital using it.

 

 
tjgkg
100%
0%
tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 9:42:02 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
For years I have been reading about ways to kill tumours without surgery but nothing has been realized yet. A maggot sized bot sounds interesting but so did all the other theories I have heard. I remember one where they were going to make some injectable drug that will kill the blood sources to the tumours causing them to shrink and die-all without surgery. Gene therapy, interferon etc.
David Wagner
50%
50%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/24/2014 | 12:36:21 PM
Re: Creepy but cool
For years I have been reading about ways to kill tumours without surgery but nothing has been realized yet. A maggot sized bot sounds interesting but so did all the other theories I have heard. I remember one where they were going to make some injectable drug that will kill the blood sources to the tumours causing them to shrink and die-all without surgery. Gene therapy, interferon etc.


You are definitely right. I think that's OK, because it means we have several competing theories. When you have multiple theories, you have a etter bchance of one going well.

Personally, I like these mechanical methods as a stop gap to a more elaboate chemical means which will take longer to develop. My understanding is surgical methods often miss parts of the tumor so they aren't always perfect. but they are faster to develop than the medical counterparts.
tjgkg
50%
50%
tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 1:59:34 PM
Re: Creepy but cool
I can speak from experience with regard to tumour therapy (unfortunately). I was lucky enough to only need radiation which was focussed on the tumour. But even the best procedures still leave room for error. And like you mentioned the surgical methods can cause problems with missing the mark, causing collateral damage or opening up the tumour to release toxins which spread to other parts of the body. It is my sincere hope that any of the competing therapies will prove fruitful to spare future patients these issues.
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 7:37:26 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@tjgkg, I think they are using drugs like that now or very similar techniques that reduce a tumor's ability to feed itself.  We are in a very exciting time as far as robotics go though.  Many of the things that were fantasy when I was a kid are very close to reality when you consider some of the more utilitarian robot solutions like self driving cars, aerial drones and surgical robots.  There is even a tattooing robot out there.  We're getting very close to getting the bigger bots right and that means the smaller ones will come along quickly as technology keeps driving on.
tjgkg
50%
50%
tjgkg,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 2:08:35 PM
Re: Creepy but cool
@SaneIT: I hope all that comes to pass soon. As someone who follows the stock market, I have been aware of Intuitive Surgical's robotic products for years now. They have the DaVinci Robot which has been quite successful. While the robots might be able to perform the surgery, you still have to have a procedure that is as minimally invasive as possible and (most importantly), hits the tumour only and not the surrounding tissue. And of course does not cause damage to the tumour to release its toxins to the rest of the body. A tall order.
Kristin Burnham
50%
50%
Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
7/25/2014 | 9:44:48 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
I can see people taking that two ways: 1) The less-invasive, the better, when it comes to surgery and 2) "I don't trust  robots when it comes to surgery." I'm split -- while I know in most cases, robots are more precise than humans, there's also something unsettling about a robot performing surgery on me. I wonder what others think?
WaqasAltaf
50%
50%
WaqasAltaf,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 7:23:46 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
Kristine, no doubt about their precision but not all surgeries go as per plan. Sometimes the bleeding goes to an unexpected level or patients' body reacts in a completely unexpected way. Will robots be able to tacke that ? I think this and other issues do indicate their limitations.
SaneIT
50%
50%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2014 | 9:28:47 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
For me, less invasive and more complete wins out over the fear of robots inside of me.  I've heard stories of leaches and maggots used to clean wounds, I'm not seeing how a robot maggot would be any worse, at least it can be programmed and monitored.
tekedge
100%
0%
tekedge,
User Rank: Moderator
7/23/2014 | 8:23:42 PM
robots to change healthcare
My worry is it may increase the cost of health care as they have to be serviced regularly and functionin well and the cost of purchasing the robots will be added to the health care costs of the patients.

Just a thought.  Ofcourse it has its advantages but there is a flip side to every coin
David Wagner
50%
50%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/24/2014 | 12:40:05 PM
Re: robots to change healthcare
@tekedge- Definitely some of these really expensive machines solving specific problems will raise the cost of healthcar.e. But several of these are intended to do the opposite. the blood drawing robot, the elder care robot, the training robots, all should lower costs by freeing up human resources to do more important jobs.

Of course, that's what people say about the cloud as well, and we all know that there is a mix of success on that front depending on how well it is deployed. So hospitals have to be smart about what they deploy and when.
Jeff Jerome
50%
50%
Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 11:28:43 PM
Re: robots to change healthcare
David It is an interesting contrast the cost of a product vs the cost of insurance for risk and exposure.  Plus in an economy of scale the devices can get less expensive and provide a subject mater expert whose skills can be updated with a .rev and reboot.  But who wants to be the first test subject after the upgrade.  What did the robot say?  "Absolutely nothing will go wrong, will go wrong will go wrong .... ."
WaqasAltaf
50%
50%
WaqasAltaf,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 7:27:15 AM
Re: robots to change healthcare
David

"all should lower costs by freeing up human resources to do more important jobs."

I hope that brings improvement in patients' welfare. In the long run, I see these costs going down significantly if these processes are automated.
zerox203
50%
50%
zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 11:04:47 AM
Re: 10 More Robots That Could Change Healthcare
What an interesting topic! It's funny how Healthcare is probably one of the greatest/most important ways that technology affects our day-to-day lives, and yet the one we're most likely to not know something about. I'm a pretty tech-savvy person (I assume most of us here are), and yet I hadn't heard of most of these. I've certainly heard of the latest nifty game controller innovations, but why not things that are more important? It's my fault, of course, but I think what you say is true, Dave; people prefer not to think of what their brain cancer treatment will look like, because they don't want to think about having brain cancer. Still, a more frank discussion leads to better advancements.

And what great advancements some of these are! They're all great, but the exeskeleton, in particular, is something I had no idea about. Some of the others are theoretical, which as we all know doesn't always translate into real usability. The fact that we have something that advanced in helping with therapy and pain relief already is pretty surprising. Looking at this list does reinforce just how broad a field 'healthcare' is. Are prosthetics really as important as cancer treatment? Maybe, but for different reasons. This is an area where there can never be too many developments or too much funding.
kstaron
50%
50%
kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 5:54:23 PM
Having b grade horror movie flashbacks
Most of these creeped me out, but the really scary thing is that I know when my kids are grown they will probably think this is how it was always done. B grade horror movie flashbackes aside, there are some really great ideas in here. At first I scoffed at the little social robot, but then remembered what a small little room my grandmother calls home in her retirement home, and how comforting it might be to be able to have a story or something if she wanted extra company. Which one is your favorite?
WaqasAltaf
50%
50%
WaqasAltaf,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 7:20:10 AM
Realizing the patients' response
David, interesting slideshow and article. It is good to see that the manufacturers realize that one of the biggest hurdle in robots' success is if patients' don't get scared off with their presence. The Riba example relating to elderly care indicates that realization.
asksqn
50%
50%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 4:27:39 PM
Racing to the Bottom
>>excerpt<<

"all should lower costs by freeing up human resources to do more important jobs."

 

>>/excerpt<<

Translation:  Lay off en masse all highly paid medical personnel so the hospital CEO can add another $5M to his salary/bennies package.

 

 

 
David Wagner
100%
0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 12:27:37 PM
Re: Racing to the Bottom
>>excerpt<<

"all should lower costs by freeing up human resources to do more important jobs."

 

>>/excerpt<<

Translation:  Lay off en masse all highly paid medical personnel so the hospital CEO can add another $5M to his salary/bennies package.

 

@asksqn- Well, that's always a danger. But before we get to that point there are real savings to make. Right now someone with multiple degrees and years of specialized training are required to take time from those jobs to help do things like change sheets while keeping a patient safe. These duties require knowledge, sensitivity, and training, but not nearly as much as many of their other duties. Chronic care management is another example.

So yes, I don't deny that this is a common problem we've seen in retail and in companies investing in the cloud. but just like there are a few smart companies investing cloud savings in innovation, it is possib;e a good hospital will do the same thing.  We can't blame the robots for the system.
Nemos
50%
50%
Nemos,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 5:04:31 PM
Interaction
I would like to see first how could be the interaction between human and robot in other areas than hospitals. The trust between patient and doctor is vital and I believe is premature to see robots in the healthcare system.
David Wagner
50%
50%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 12:32:55 PM
Re: Interaction
@nemos- Fair enough. In fact, there is a robot I was researching for another story that sings. And the reason the inventor created a singing robot is that he felt that real robots needed to be seen in entertainment so we can trust them elsewhere in our lives. If we get used to robots on TV, in our retail stores, etc, he believe we'll accept them in places like healthcare and at work.

So I suggest you buy a ticket to the next robot rock concert you hear about. :)
Broadway0474
50%
50%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 11:06:06 PM
Re: Interaction
@David, there have been plenty of robots in the entertainment field. Just see The Terminator. Or The Matrix. Not sure any of those robots could sing, but they sure could act ... very badly. Don't trust them!
David Wagner
50%
50%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/30/2014 | 12:01:14 AM
Re: Interaction
@Broadway- Ha! I think he meant nice robots. :)
Big Love for Big Data? The Remedy for Healthcare Quality Improvements
Big Love for Big Data? The Remedy for Healthcare Quality Improvements
Healthcare data is nothing new, but yet, why do healthcare improvements from quantifiable data seem almost rare today? Healthcare administrators have a wealth of data accessible to them but aren't sure how much of that data is usable or even correct.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 7, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program!
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.