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7/22/2014
07:06 AM
David Wagner
David Wagner
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10 More Robots That Could Change Healthcare

These medical robots bring fresh ideas to healthcare. Ready to see one at your local hospital?
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I, for one, welcome our new robot overlords. Still, as they infiltrate everything from our assembly lines to our living rooms, robots can be just a little disconcerting. Now they plan to conquer the hospital. The first time a robot crawls down your throat or carries you from your bed, you'll likely panic. But before you enlist to fight against the robot threat, remember their purpose -- robots go where we can't, either because of danger or physical limitations. So, before they end up taking over the planet and enslaving humans, they are going to do some amazing things to save our lives.

In fact, robots and medicine go so well together this isn't the first medical robot slideshow we've done. Back in 2012, we covered robots that could do anything from reminding you to take a pill to scraping plaque off your arteries. We showcased more medical robots last year. We just can't get enough.

And for good reason. The medical robot field is growing exponentially. The current $1.7 billion medical robot market is expected to rise to more than $3.7 billion by 2018. And this does not include robots in fire and rescue, military training, and robots designed to improve home life.

It is difficult to estimate just how many robots are wandering the halls of our local hospitals, because it depends on how you define robot. For instance, at least 800 hospitals use telepresence robots. These are rolling devices controlled by doctors and equipped with cameras and tools to allow for remote consultations. There are also "robot surgeons" like the da Vinci, which also require a human to operate them remotely. Both of these are innovative, but they aren't robots so much as remotely operated machines. We wouldn't call a remote control toy car a robot.

For the purpose of this slideshow, we're going to focus more on robots that aren't fancy remote controls for doctors. And when we do talk about remote vehicles, they will include novel approaches that are just too good to ignore. (Spoiler: Doctors use robot "maggots" to drill into your head and eat tumors.)

These amazing robots will do everything from clearing cancerous tumors to helping amputees learn to play music again. They perform more mundane tasks, as well, such as helping patients take medicine, and even throwing up. Why do we need a robot that throws up? You'll have to click through the slideshow to find out. But I promise you'll see a set of really exciting ideas.

David has been writing on business and technology for over 10 years and was most recently Managing Editor at Enterpriseefficiency.com. Before that he was an Assistant Editor at MIT Sloan Management Review, where he covered a wide range of business topics including IT, ... View Full Bio

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tekedge
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tekedge,
User Rank: Moderator
7/23/2014 | 8:23:42 PM
robots to change healthcare
My worry is it may increase the cost of health care as they have to be serviced regularly and functionin well and the cost of purchasing the robots will be added to the health care costs of the patients.

Just a thought.  Ofcourse it has its advantages but there is a flip side to every coin
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/23/2014 | 6:37:21 PM
Re: Creepy but cool
@SaneIt- Somehow i missed the sperm extractor. Do share with us when you get a chance.
David Wagner
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0%
David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/23/2014 | 6:35:47 PM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@broadway0474- I don't want to name names, but the doctor who relied on my MRI and never touched my leg saw me in person. He is also the team physician of a major college sports team, and has quite a reputation as an orthopediac surgeon. Personally, I don't think he misdiagnosed me because he was incapable, but because he was indifferent. In two appointments, he spent a grand total of 7 minutes with me.

At one point he tossed me my own MRI and said, "read 'em and weep." And then he told me I'd have to avoid any activity for 9 months. Without going into more boring details, i was back on a softball field in 6 weeks, and it is not only 5 months and I'm back to running multiple miles a day.

I don't personally care where my doctor is if he takes the time to care.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/23/2014 | 6:31:04 PM
Re: Kernerworks
@vnewman2- Thanks for the insights and sharing your experience. I'm thinking i want to make a drowing robot simulator in my spare time now. Seems like the kind of simple but transformative idea healthcare needs.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:40:40 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Ashish agree with you there. But in cases where practical experience is not available we need to depend on theoraticalexperience. Many atimes experimental analysis are just as actual contigency.
nomii
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0%
nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:38:41 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Gigi absolutely. I think advantage of tech invreases many folds by having video conferencing. I think it can be used as a tool to carry out specialized operations with consent of specialists sitting thousands of mile away in a time sensitive case. I hope robots will be a major way forward in case of extremely sensitive cases.
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:33:49 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@David-Good points!

Practical experience always beats analysts who just read reports.

Regards

Ashish.
Ashu001
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0%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:31:07 AM
Re: nifty, but not likely
@Gigi-Quite right!

A lot of this outsourcing is getting very controversial today because of the Lack of Privacy regulations or non-compatibility of them in those other countries(where the Medical Reports are outsourced).

It also does'nt help that these are relatively well paying jobs back in US & Europe today and with increasing amount of Unemployment here they tend to raise all kinds of Anti-Outsourcing Backlash.

Regards

Ashish.

 
Ashu001
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100%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:27:34 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@SaneIT-We already have such Micro-bots available at most Advanced Hospitals[Atleast for Research];They do a really-really good at surgery today.

I am sure this Maggot-Bot will also feed off the very same concept.

Regards

Ashish.

 
Ashu001
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100%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
7/23/2014 | 11:23:14 AM
Re: Creepy but cool
@Pedro-You have a most brilliant! Brilliant Suggestion here!!!

Baldness is a very-very serious problem in a large number of men today.

Any move to solve it will go a long-long way towards helping men re-gain their self-esteem.

Good One!

Regards

Ashish.
<<   <   Page 5 / 11   >   >>
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