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All The News That's Fit To Goog...Er, Search For

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: All The News That's Fit To Goog...Er, Search For
2. Today's Top Story
    - AOL Exposes Search Data Of 658,000 People
    Related Stories:
    - New Tool Targets Intellectual Property Theft
    - AT&T Spy Suit On Hold
3. Breaking News
    - Review: 5 Top Personal Video Sites
    - Users Beware: Don't Upload That Video!
    - Windows Live Spaces Has Rough Launch
    - Intel Supports Multicore Education At 45 Universities
    - CinemaNow Disputes Report Of Burn-To-DVD Problems
    - When MySpace Away, Adult, Dating Sites Get Better Play
    - Engineer-Starved Headhunter Offers Cash
    - Virtual ID Card Designed For Children
    - Analysis: Dell Looking Beyond Low Prices To Grow
    - Viacom, Google Aim Ad-Backed Videos At Web Sites
4. Grab Bag
    - Nation Of Cameroon Typo-Squats The Entire .Com Space (CircleID)
    - Even Dead People Can't Escape AOL (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
    - Let's Say Your Toilet Backs Up. How Do You Find A Good Plumber? (NY Times - reg. required)
    - Nokia Phones Are Most Popular Among Pickpockets (Newslab)
5. In Depth: Black Hat
    - Black Hat Attendees Most Interested In Windows Vista: Survey
    - Q&A: Cisco's Chief Security Officer Explains NAC Strategy Shift
    - Black Hat: Feds Look To Arrest ID Theft With New Industry Alliance
    - Black Hat: Standards Issues Open Network Security Holes
    - Black Hat Presentation To Show Flaws In NAC
    - Black Hat: Vista Vulnerable To Stealthy Malware Despite Body Cavity Search
    - Cisco Firewall Vulnerability Demonstrated At Black Hat
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Black Hat: How's Your Security Crystal Ball Looking?
7. White Papers
    - The Opt-In E-Mail Marketer's Checklist For Inbox Delivery
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Language is simply alive, like an organism... Words are the cells of language, moving the great body, on legs. Language grows and evolves, leaving fossils behind." -- Lewis Thomas


1. Editor's Note: All The News That's Fit To Goog...Er, Search For

The last seven days were hopping for Google watchers. Indeed, judging from the company's frenetic pace, it won't be long before Stanford has an endowed chair of Googleology—which has as much chance of being located in the law school or sociology department as in the computer science building.

My favorite item involves fallout from last month's news, which just about every media outlet picked up on, that the word "google" had entered Merriam-Webster's dictionary as a verb. Here's InformationWeek's take on that story, for example.

For some reason, however, Google's lawyers took specific umbrage with The Washington Post's rather tongue-in-cheek reporting and sent the writer their standard but still delicious letter accusing him of "genericide." Yes, that's a real word, referring to what happens when a business loses control of its trademark.

Among other things, Google's letter—which has been making the rounds of various legal departments for years—suggests the right way to use its name. Appropriate: "I used Google to check out that guy I met at the party." Inappropriate: "I googled that hottie." Aside from proving Google lawyers have tin ears when it comes to crafting dialogue, it showed they have an even poorer understanding of journalists' psychology, as of course the writer in question, Post staff reporter Frank Ahrens, gleefully put up portions of the letter on the paper's Web site over the weekend.

Doug Edwards, who until 2005 was director of consumer marketing and brand management for Google, in his blog called Google "silly" in its attempt to fight the natural evolution of a living language. (He shamefacedly admitted he had an active role in forging this and other like letters.) It is, he wrote, "about as effective as standing in a rising river and yelling at the rain to stop falling."

A case in point: Google "googled," and you come up with 6.6 million pages. Google "googling," and you get 14.4 million. That's a lot of horses running around loose after the barn doors have been closed.

Moreover, as Edwards pointed out, such missives make Google's "don't be evil" motto come off like a great big "kick me" sign on its corporate backside.

The dangers of Google losing control of its trademark have been analyzed ad infinitum, but best and most succinctly by Intellectual Asset Management Magazine in its June/July 2004 issue.

Meanwhile, Google's share of the search engine market continues to rise. Over the past month, more than 60% of U.S.-based Internet searches were executed from the Google home page.

I'd call this good news for Google—and further evidence that the brand is alive and kicking. I understand the fear of brand dilution. But I don't know a single person who says "googled" when they really mean "yahooed." Or "microsofted." Or "asked." To google means to use Google. Sounds like a marketing home run to me.

There were many, many other items googled for your ogling pleasure. To read about those or to respond to this note, go to my blog entry.

Alice LaPlante
Alice.laplante@gmail.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

AOL Exposes Search Data Of 658,000 People
AOL apologizes for a "screw-up" that made information available for download through its research site.

Related Stories:

New Tool Targets Intellectual Property Theft
CodeSuite compares source code to detect plagiarism, copyright infringement, intellectual property theft, and patent infringement.

AT&T Spy Suit On Hold
Judge Vaughn Walker has granted a brief stay until a hearing Tuesday, when the stay could be continued.


3. Breaking News

Google To Pay $900M To Provide Search For MySpace.com
Under the deal, Google would be the exclusive provider of text-based advertising and keyword-targeted ads on the Fox Interactive Media network.

Review: 5 Top Personal Video Sites
Want to become the next viral video star? Looking for the latest underground video art? We review five of the top personal video sites.

Users Beware: Don't Upload That Video!
Do you like using video sites like YouTube? Better be careful: You might be violating copyright laws.

Windows Live Spaces Has Rough Launch
Among the complaints, which Microsoft said it's working to resolve, are slow page loading and difficulty configuring the layout and viewing the blogs in Internet Explorer and Firefox browsers.

Intel Supports Multicore Education At 45 Universities
The move is said to prepare students for software development in an increasingly multicore world.

CinemaNow Disputes Report Of Burn-To-DVD Problems
The company says tests show the burned DVDs work on 94% of DVD players, despite claims that they won't run on many commercial players.

When MySpace Away, Adult, Dating Sites Get Better Play
Google gained the greatest increase in market share during the time MySpace was down in late July, as measured by page impressions, according to Hitwise.

Engineer-Starved Headhunter Offers Cash
The $5,000 Future Engineers Scholarship, now in its fourth year, recognizes exceptional engineering students throughout the nation and is intended to encourage students to complete their engineering training.

Virtual ID Card Designed For Children
NetIDme is an electronic identity card that displays the user's first name, age, gender, and general location. Children can use it to verify information about others in chat rooms and social networks or when exchanging instant messages.

Analysis: Dell Looking Beyond Low Prices To Grow
Dell may have to buy a rival or aggressively expand beyond PCs and sell more printers, televisions, and services, analysts said. But competition is also fierce in those markets, and the company has historically avoided large acquisitions.

Viacom, Google Aim Ad-Backed Videos At Web Sites
The project, a year in the making, marks the first time Google will distribute ad-supported videos across its AdSense network from a major programming provider. The ads begin testing later this month.

All Our Latest News

Watch The News Show

In the current episode:

John Soat With 'Good Medicine'
Microsoft plans to release 10 security patches for Windows tomorrow, IBM is offering free info on RFID, and New York City's transit produces a podcast.

Stephanie Stahl With 'Bad Medicine'
Are you a "cyberchondriac"? More Americans are searching for health information online.

Sacha Lecca With 'Implants Exposed'
Stanford researchers find RFID can decrease the chance that a surgeon will leave a foreign object inside a patient.


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

IT Priorities 3Q
Assess business technology managers' outlook on the economy and business prospects for the coming quarter with InformationWeek Research's IT Priorities 3Q report, part of our Priorities series.

Podcasts
Get the best technology audio and video delivered at our new Podcast Central page, including The News Show, the InformationWeek Daily News Podcast, and Dr. Dobbs' .Net Casts.

-----------------------------------------


4. Grab Bag

Nation Of Cameroon Typo-Squats The Entire .Com Space (CircleID)
Savvy ccTLD operators in Cameroon, having decided that there are riches to be found in the typo traffic that comes their way (their .cm TLD is just one omitted letter away from .com), have wild-carded their ccTLD and are attempting to monetize the results.

Even Dead People Can't Escape AOL (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
An AOL account once held by a St. Louis resident's late father is still accumulating billing charges, despite many attempts by the survivors to cancel the account.

Let's Say Your Toilet Backs Up. How Do You Find A Good Plumber? (NY Times - reg. required)
Local search sites are trying to replicate word-of-mouth networks and send consumers to the best local businesses.

Nokia Phones Are Most Popular Among Pickpockets (Newslab)
Nokia has the dubious honor of manufacturing the most often stolen mobile phones in the world, followed by Samsung and Motorola.


5. In Depth: Black Hat

Black Hat Attendees Most Interested In Windows Vista: Survey
Web services are another hot area of interest, according to a survey of 400 conference attendees.

Researchers: NAC Experiencing Growing Pains
Better network management and a better understanding of what's on the corporate network, how they operate, and what they do would help network access control products defend against malware.

Q&A: Cisco's Chief Security Officer Explains NAC Strategy Shift
Cisco Chief Security Officer John Stewart talks at Black Hat about recent developments in Cisco's Network Admission Control initiative, as well as larger issues affecting the security industry.

Black Hat: Feds Look To Arrest ID Theft With New Industry Alliance
The FBI's "Operation Identity Shield" looks to enlist security researchers and the industry in general to help crack down on identity theft.

Black Hat: Standards Issues Open Network Security Holes
A lack of standards has opened up holes in corporate networks that can be exploited by hackers, according to a presentation at this week's Black Hat security conference.

Black Hat Presentation To Show Flaws In NAC
An Israeli vendor of monitoring systems plans to demonstrate specific weaknesses associated with a variety of network access control systems.

Black Hat: Vista Vulnerable To Stealthy Malware Despite Body Cavity Search
A security researcher demonstrated how to trick the Windows Vista Beta 2 kernel, x64 edition, into allowing any unsigned device driver to be loaded onto a user's system. This opens the door to malicious code injection. Defenses to such an attack were also presented.

Cisco Firewall Vulnerability Demonstrated At Black Hat
A Cisco spokesman says the company is aware of the information, but "can not confirm the validity of the claims."


6. Voice Of Authority

Black Hat: How's Your Security Crystal Ball Looking?
According to Larry Greenemeier, the best reason to attend Black Hat is the opportunity to see what's on the horizon. He delves into three security issues he observed that will sooner rather than later have a significant impact on the security of your systems and/or data.


7. White Papers

The Opt-In E-Mail Marketer's Checklist For Inbox Delivery
Learn how IP addresses, DNS entries, and SPF records affect the deliverability of your e-mail messages to current or prospective clients.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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