News
Commentary
6/13/2006
00:00 AM
Stowe Boyd
Stowe Boyd
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Andrew McAfee on Enterprise 2.0

I recently spoke with Andrew McAfee of the Harvard Business School, and I am happy to say that he will be presenting at next week's Collaborative Technologies Conference 2006 in Boston.

His article in the Sloan Management Review highlighted the term "Enterprise 2.0" (although he wasn't the first to coin it), and he has continued his inquiry into that topic at his blog, where he defines the term in the following way:

Now, since I was the first to write extensively about Enterprise 2.0 I feel I'm entitled to define it:

'Enterprise 2.0' is the use of freeform social software within companies.

'Freeform' in this case means that the software is most or all of the following:

  • Optional
  • Free of up-front workflow
  • Egalitarian, or indifferent to formal organizational identities
  • Accepting of many types of data

'Social' means that there's always a person on at least one end of the wire with Enterprise 2.0 technologies. With wikis, prediction markets, blogs, del.icio.us, and other Web 2.0 technologies with clear enterprise applications people are doing all the interacting and providing some or all of the content; the IT is just doing housekeeping and/or bookkeeping.

At the conference, Andrew will provide a progress report of the use of these social tools in the enterprise, and discuss what companies have learned from their initial experiences with Enterprise 2.0.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Government, May 2014
Protecting Critical Infrastructure: A New Approach NIST's cyber-security framework gives critical-infrastructure operators a new tool to assess readiness. But will operators put this voluntary framework to work?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.