News
News
12/31/2002
01:07 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Another Year And The Internet Can Legally Drink

In 1983, ARPANET officially switched from the Network Control Program protocol to TCP/IP, setting the stage for a revolution.

The Internet popped the cork in celebration of its 20th anniversary on New Year's Day.

In 1983, the Department of Defense's Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET) officially switched from the Network Control Program (NCP) protocol to Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). Six months later, ARPANET was split into two subnetworks--ARPANET, which would continue to serve researchers and eventually be renamed as the Internet, and MILNET, a network the military used to share unclassified information.

The original ARPANET had only a single network address, says Robert Braden, a project engineer for the University of Southern California's Information Sciences Institute. "When you split that address using TCP/IP, you could add more computers to the network connected by routers," says Braden, who wrote the TCP/IP code for UCLA's IBM mainframe in preparation for the 1983 switchover.

"This was the beginning of the ability to connect different networks together." The launch of the Internet heralded a new way of looking at computers--as communications devices rather than simply as number crunchers.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.