Anti-Spam Company Files Billion-Dollar Spam Lawsuit - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
News
News
4/26/2007
06:34 PM
Connect Directly
LinkedIn
Twitter
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Anti-Spam Company Files Billion-Dollar Spam Lawsuit

Unspam Technologies is seeking damages on behalf of the members of Project Honey Pot, based on the Can-Spam Act.

Unspam Technologies is living up to its name. The anti-spam company Thursday filed a lawsuit in Virginia against unnamed spammers for violating the Can-Spam Act and the Virginia Computer Crimes Act.

The lawsuit seeks more than $1 billion in damages on behalf of the members of Project Honey Pot, a distributed spam identification system run by Unspam that gathers spam data from decoy e-mail addresses -- honeypots -- and then shares information to assist spam identification.

Attorney Jon Praed is representing Unspam. He's the founding partner of the Internet Law Group and has represented Verizon and AOL in past lawsuits against notorious spammers.

Praed says that the complaint puts at issue all of the spam Project Honey Pot has received. That's 6.1 million spam messages received between January 2005 and April 2006, according to the court filing, which puts the number of spam servers in Virginia at more than 20,000.

"We don't know yet and can't know how many individuals are responsible," said Praed, adding that once the spammers are identified, the number of defendants will likely prove surprisingly small.

The next step is discovery. Praed declined to detail how he planned to identify the spammers but said that Project Honey Pot provided plenty of data to work with. Presumably, he will be issuing subpoenas to ISPs associated with spam servers.

Praed acknowledged that it may be difficult to stop overseas spammers. "We have to take into account the reality of what we're capable of doing," he said. "But just because someone is outside the U.S. doesn't mean they're immune from responsibility."

In instances where spammers prove to be beyond the reach of Virginia law, Praed hopes the legal roadblocks will help direct policy debates and inform future anti-spam legislation. "There are lots of ways we can affect positive change," he said.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
2017 State of the Cloud Report
As the use of public cloud becomes a given, IT leaders must navigate the transition and advocate for management tools or architectures that allow them to realize the benefits they seek. Download this report to explore the issues and how to best leverage the cloud moving forward.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of November 6, 2016. We'll be talking with the InformationWeek.com editors and correspondents who brought you the top stories of the week to get the "story behind the story."
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll