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9/14/2009
03:51 PM
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Apple TV Cuts Price

The device that lets iTunes users buy and store movies, TV shows, and music and play them on a high-definition television is now $100 cheaper.

Apple over the weekend lopped $100 off the 160-GB model of the Apple TV and discontinued the 40-GB version of the home media player.

Apple is now selling the 160-GB model for $229, which was the price of the smaller version before it was discontinued. Apple is offering shipping at no charge.

Apple TV essentially connects the company's iTunes online store with a high-definition TV. With an Internet connection, the device can be used to buy and store movies, TV shows, and music. Apple TV also can be used to display photos and other content on an iTunes-carrying PC or Mac through a wired or wireless connection.

Apple TV was released in March 2007. The first version had a 40-GB hard drive, which is enough storage for up to 50 hours of standard video, and cost $299.

While Apple has released software updates for the device, a major overhaul has yet to be released, although industry observers believe one is in the works. In speculation leading to Apple's iPod announcements last week, analysts had said it was possible a new version of the Apple TV would be released.

It wasn't, but Apple will eventually have to update the device in order to compete with other consumer electronics being introduced that connect the Internet to the TV. Blockbuster and Netflix, which compete with iTunes in online movie rentals, have been signing deals with hardware manufacturers to access their service through DVD players and other devices.


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