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Another Google Chrome Security Flaw Identified

The "SaveAs" problem is a critical buffer-overflow vulnerability that could allow a hacker to perform a remote attack and take complete control of the affected system.

Another security vulnerability in Google's new Chrome browser has been identified.

Vietnamese security company Bach Khoa Internet Security (BKIS) has found a flaw in Google Chrome 0.2.149.27 and posted details on its Web site. The company says the problem is a critical buffer-overflow vulnerability that could allow a hacker to perform a remote attack and take complete control of the affected system.

"The vulnerability is caused due to a boundary error when handling the 'SaveAs' function," BKIS explains on its Web site. "On saving a malicious page with an overly long title (title tag in HTML), the program causes a stack-based overflow and makes it possible for attackers to execute arbitrary code on users' systems."

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To successfully exploit this vulnerability, an attacker would have to convince someone to visit a malicious page and then attempt to save the page.

BKIS says it has submitted the vulnerability to Google, which presumably will address the issue in a future build.

BKIS has posted proof-of-concept code to demonstrate the flaw on its Web site.

Google officially released its own Web browser in beta on Tuesday, complete with examples of how fast and secure the software is compared with other Web browsers like Microsoft's Internet Explorer, Mozilla's Firefox, and even Apple's Safari.

Earlier this week, security researcher Aviv Raff found that a flaw in the open source WebKit engine could be combined with a Java bug to install malware on Chrome users' desktops.

And another security researcher, Rishi Narang, reported a way to crash Chrome with a malicious link. Proof-of-concept code has been posted.

At Milw0rm.com, a repository for security exploit code, two other Chrome exploits have been published. Someone identified as "Nerex" has posted proof-of-concept JavaScript code that supposedly "allows files (e.g., executables) to be automatically downloaded to the user's computer without any user prompt." (This may be related to the vulnerability that Raff found.) And someone identified as "WHK" has published code that supposedly will crash Chrome.

Google claims that Chrome's sandboxed multiprocess architecture eventually will lead to fewer crashes and improved protection from malicious sites.

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