Shakeup Bodes Ill For Windows Phone 7 - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
Mobile // Mobile Applications
Commentary
5/25/2010
11:30 PM
Dave Methvin
Dave Methvin
Commentary
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
[Best Practices] Managing Multiple Clouds
Jul 26, 2017
Putting all your eggs in one cloud basket is risky, because clouds are not immune to denials of se ...Read More>>

Shakeup Bodes Ill For Windows Phone 7

Hoo boy. For every step forward lately, Microsoft is taking two steps back. Windows 7 has been a great success to the company's bottom line and reputation, but the implosion at the Entertainment and Devices Division (E&DD) is bringing the company back into negative-karma territory.

Hoo boy. For every step forward lately, Microsoft is taking two steps back. Windows 7 has been a great success to the company's bottom line and reputation, but the implosion at the Entertainment and Devices Division (E&DD) is bringing the company back into negative-karma territory.




Windows Phone 7 start screen
(click for image gallery)

Let's face it, though, E&DD could use a hard slap in the face to wake it from its stupor. It took most of the past decade and $8 billion to squeak XBox marginally into the black. Zune never made a dent in the iPod's dominance. Microsoft's trendy-wannabe Kin phones landed with a thud. The buzz-generating Courier tablet project was killed, supposedly over the objections of the now-departing J Allard. Hewlett Packard decides to buy Palm and use the PalmOS for its tablets, rather than a Microsoft product.

Whether any of those projects could have been done better is all water under the bridge. Microsoft can only hope that some lessons were learned. They need to learn those lessons in order to improve an even more strategic product arriving by the end of the year: Windows Phone 7.

There are some hopeful signs. The reorganization separates the mobile business from the rest of Eⅅ that makes some sense given that Microsoft's primary mobile customers (at least the current ones) are businesses, whereas most of the other components are consumer-focused. Yet Microsoft is falling behind its competitors. Apple is soon revealing its next-generation phone, and Google's Android OS is now on dozens of devices using many different carriers. By the time Windows Phone 7 arrives, those two will be even more entrenched and further along.

Perhaps the most ominous angle of this reorganization is that Steve Ballmer will be personally overseeing ED&D. Ballmer's leadership hasn't driven Microsoft to excellence over the past decade. If he's taking a more active role in Windows Phone 7, perhaps this will be his final sink-or-swim moment.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
IT Strategies to Conquer the Cloud
Chances are your organization is adopting cloud computing in one way or another -- or in multiple ways. Understanding the skills you need and how cloud affects IT operations and networking will help you adapt.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll