News & Commentary
Content tagged with Infrastructure posted in March 2007
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Copyright: Fair Use Is Your Friend
Commentary  |  3/30/2007  | 
Nine out of 10 people would probably tell you copyright is all about big companies maximizing their revenue from the content they own at the expense of the consumer. (The 10th person would tell you copyright is a cornerstone of our American way of life, but he'd turn out to be lawyer for the RIAA, the Recording Industry Association of America). In fact, copyright is as much about your right to make fair use of copyrighted content as it is about the "intellectual property" of corporations. For 11
NYC Falling On Wrong Side Of Digital Divide, Officials Worry
News  |  3/30/2007  | 
Broadband access hearing discusses ways to improve access and education for the underserved areas of the metropolis.
AT&T Makes Business Directory A Text Message Away
News  |  3/30/2007  | 
To get listings, a user simply sends a message to YP411 with a business name or category, along with a city and state or ZIP code. In return, YellowPages.com delivers up to three listings.
Dell Linux Still Won't Kill Windows
Commentary  |  3/30/2007  | 
Bruise it slightly, perhaps. But seriously, would you or your company buy a Linux PC from Dell this year? How much would you pay for support?
TiVo Adds Sharing Of Internet Video
News  |  3/30/2007  | 
TiVo this week announced a new way for subscribers to share personal videos using One True Media's online video post-production service.
Denmark Beats Out U.S. In 'Networked' Technology
News  |  3/30/2007  | 
America still features strong points like leadership in innovation and venture capital, according to a World Economic Forum report
ICANN Again Vetoes .XXX Adult Content Domain
News  |  3/30/2007  | 
Religious groups and even the adult content industry are divided on a separate domain for sex sites.
Could The iPhone Destroy Apple's Reputation?
Commentary  |  3/30/2007  | 
MarketWatch columnist John Dvorak argues that Apple should just make the iPhone a reference design and move on. Why, you may ask, would Apple want to walk away from the hottest mobile device in years? Because it isn't equipped to handle the demands of the nonstop mobile phone market, that's why.
Intel Research Goes For Long Distance Wi-Fi
News  |  3/30/2007  | 
The idea is to develop a low-cost antenna that can transmit and receive Wi-Fi signals over distances as far as 100 kilometers, or about 62 miles.
Microsoft Describes How Virtual Earth Was Built
Commentary  |  3/29/2007  | 
You want to know what the definition of "cool" is? It's sitting in the front row of a hotel meeting hall, watching a demo of Microsoft Virtual Earth on the 12-foot display in the front of the room, as the camera plunges from the sky to swoop and soar around detailed digital models of the Staples Center in Los Angeles and the streets of Philadelphia. Even cooler: Listening to John Curlander, general manager of Microsoft Virtual Earth, explain how it was built.
Cisco And IBM Aim For Smarter Video Surveillance
News  |  3/29/2007  | 
New advances in IP-based digital video surveillance cameras, recorders, and analysis software promise to help retailers and other businesses put the kibosh on theft.
NextWave Raises $355 Million To Fund Drive Into WiMax And Wi-Fi
News  |  3/29/2007  | 
The firm said the $355 million would be used to speed up development of new wireless technologies, expand company business, and facilitate strategic acquisitions.
Yahoo And Microsoft Fight For Mobile Search While Google Pushes For The Entire Third Screen
Commentary  |  3/29/2007  | 
I have finally settled back into New York after a jam-packed visit to this year's CTIA Wireless in Orlando, Fla. One of the big stories in the wider media that, surprisingly, didn't generate much insider buzz at CTIA was the on-going war to capture the emerging mobile search market.
New Services Move More Security Into The Network Cloud
News  |  3/29/2007  | 
AT&T and Trend Micro are both expanding the network-based security services they're offering to business customers.
Feds Look For Tech Upgrade From Giant Telecom Contracts
News  |  3/29/2007  | 
It's still too early to tell how much business will come out of the contract, but government estimates range from $20 billion over 10 years to as much as $48 billion.
$1 Million Or Bust
Commentary  |  3/29/2007  | 
Chris Massey is on a cockamamie quest to make $1 million this year.
Gambling With The Internet
Commentary  |  3/29/2007  | 
When Congress passed the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act (UIGEA), which forced online gambling companies to adhere to federal and state gambling laws, it wouldn't have been out of the ordinary to assume that the reason for the crackdown was the attempt to protect compulsive gamblers from descending into a morass of debt via their home computers. But, like many other "sin" regulations, the real story is a lot more complex -- and money has more to do with it than morals.
Philips Offers Mobile Phone With AAA Battery Backup
News  |  3/29/2007  | 
The Xenium NRG phone was built in partnership with Energizer Holdings and Techtium, a chipmaker specializing in power management.
Lie-Detection Software Could Scan E-Mail, Text Messages
News  |  3/29/2007  | 
Software could be trained to detect patterns of lies in text for law enforcement, dates, and spouses.
Is SAP Imploding?
Commentary  |  3/29/2007  | 
Shai Agassi brought something fresh to SAP. Young and dashing, he could engage an audience of customers from a stage with the savvy of a marketing exec, yet he was foremost a very smart technologist.
Microsoft Research Provides Sneak Preview Of 'Boku' Programming Environment For Kids
Commentary  |  3/29/2007  | 
A Microsoft researcher on Wednesday demonstrated Boku, an educational game designed to help children as young as five years old exercise their brains by doing programming. Boku is a cute little cartoon robot head with big, soulful eyes who hovers over a cartoon grassy field.

Jeff Hawkins, Who Invented PalmPilot, Says He's Figured Out How The Brain Works
Commentary  |  3/28/2007  | 
You can't complain that Jeff Hawkins is falsely modest. Hawkins, whose last triumph was inventing the PalmPilot, claims to have solved the greatest problem in 60 years of computer science. He says he's figured out how the human brain works, and has built a model in software, with practical applications imminent. Not only that, he says he's released a lot of the code in open source.

IBM's 160-Gbps Optical Chipset Is A Long Way Off
News  |  3/28/2007  | 
It's more likely the chipset will serve optical transport networks before they speed up movie downloads, one analyst argues.
Hospitals Late To See Benefits Of IT Investments, Study Suggests
News  |  3/28/2007  | 
Only a handful of U.S. acute care hospitals have reached a tipping point, according to a new report.
Network Games That Change Their Users Lives, And The World, For The Better
Commentary  |  3/28/2007  | 
Game designer Jane McGonigal has a vision for a new generation of network games that will pull players away from their lonely consoles, and get them out in the world, interacting with each other and changing their own lives, and society, for the better.

Photos Of The $100 One Laptop Per Child Laptop
Commentary  |  3/27/2007  | 
I was able to get my hands on the One Laptop Per Child $100 laptop at the O'Reilly ETech conference today. I took pictures, and they came out great -- take a look for yourself below the fold. The OLPC looks like a toy, with its hard plastic enclosure, soft plastic keyboard, bright colors, and handle. But it's a fully functional computer, designed for children in the emerging world.

Smartphones Hit The Runway At CTIA
News  |  3/27/2007  | 
The announcements continue the trend of smartphone makers moving into the consumer market with lower priced and more stylish devices.
AT&T COO Shows Off The iPhone At CTIA
Commentary  |  3/27/2007  | 
Just in case you thought the iPhone wasn't hanging out at CTIA, think again. During today's keynote addresses, the iPhone made a rare public appearance. Like a silver screen diva from Hollywood's golden age, the iPhone is a source of public hysteria wherever it goes.
Best Buy Sees A Growth Future In RFID
News  |  3/27/2007  | 
At stores where the retailer has tested RFID technology, revenue has increased by 18.7%, and number of units sold are up 14.1%.
Shimmin On Software: SOA Gets Real, Virtually
Commentary  |  3/27/2007  | 
Enter SOA virtualization. Well, almost. The notion of tricking a server into running various operating systems or databases within separate virtual machines may be old hat, but it's just now beginning make its way up the stack.
Microsoft-Backed Startup Offers A Zoom Lens For Mobile Apps
News  |  3/27/2007  | 
The company, ZenZui, has developed a software interface that lets mobile users easily zoom in on and enlarge content on their favorite Web sites.
PlayStation Power Boosts Scientific Research
News  |  3/27/2007  | 
Games almost become a secondary feature as Folding@home subscribers are helping fight Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, cancer, and other diseases.
Microsoft Blames Itself For Xbox Hack
News  |  3/27/2007  | 
Microsoft has admitted that its own support staff was pretexted, or duped with social engineering tricks, into giving hackers access to users' account information.
Death Threats Force Designer To Cancel ETech Conference Appearance
Commentary  |  3/26/2007  | 
Designer Kathy Sierra abruptly cancelled her appearance at the O'Reilly ETech conference here in San Diego this week, after receiving graphic and sexual death threats that made her afraid to leave her house, she wrote on her blog today.

IBM Unveils IP Telephony Apps For System i
News  |  3/26/2007  | 
The software bundle includes Web conferencing and the ability to share and collaborate on documents, for a maximum of six people.
Gates, Jobs Go Head-To-Head In "I'm A Mac" Commercial Parody
Commentary  |  3/26/2007  | 
This humorous video pits Microsoft's Bill Gates and Apple's Steve Jobs against each other in a parody of the "I'm a Mac / I'm a PC" TV commercial. Cute. Watch it below the fold. Contains some mild foul language.
Faster Chipsets? It's About Time
Commentary  |  3/26/2007  | 
Lord knows, getting any kind of breakthrough innovation in the computer hardware sector is like working at Dunkin' Donuts ... so many variations using pretty much the same materials again and again.
Wal-Mart Rethinks RFID
News  |  3/26/2007  | 
Although Wal-Mart is still bullish on RFID and plans to add it to hundreds more stores this year, it now talks about the technology as more of a baby-steps approach.
Symbian Targets Mass Market With Upgraded Smartphone Operating System
News  |  3/26/2007  | 
The new operating system is designed to allow manufacturers to build "smartphones at feature-phone prices," the company said.
IBM Unveils Speedy Optical Chipset
News  |  3/26/2007  | 
The prototype streams data within computer systems over light pulses eight times faster than optical components in use today, IBM claims.
The Ascent Into Hell, Postponed
Commentary  |  3/26/2007  | 
Most U.S. air travelers -- almost 70% of them, according to a 2005 poll by USA Today -- breathed a collective sigh of relief late last week when the Federal Communications Commission decided to extend its current ban on cell phone use on planes indefinitely.
U.S. And U.K. Breeding Most Malicious Code
News  |  3/26/2007  | 
A new Finjan report also shows that embedding malicious code in ads on legitimate sites is a growing security threat.
Alcatel-Lucent Lands $6 Billion Network Expansion Contract From Verizon Wireless
News  |  3/26/2007  | 
The three-year deal covers network equipment, software, and services that support ongoing expansion of Verizon's nationwide mobile phone network.
Mellanox Adapters Aid Multicore Processor Installations
News  |  3/26/2007  | 
The advancements take the pressure off the host processors and allow for faster information transformation, the company said.
Tiny Apps For Linux On Slow Hardware
Commentary  |  3/26/2007  | 
Linux has a well-deserved reputation for running well on less-powerful hardware than it takes to run Windows, and articles like How To Revive An Old PC With Linux offer lots of good advice. It's a great, no-cost way to get started with Linux. And here's what you'll need next: a great list of tiny, ultra-light-weight applications that will give you maximum computing for minimum footprint on you
The Web Just Wants To Be Rude
Commentary  |  3/25/2007  | 
The response to a recent blog post of mine has set me wondering just why it is that the first impulse of people who don't like what you write on the Web is to sling personal invective, mostly in the form of semi-literate screeds littered with curse words. The apparent answer: The anonymity provided by the Internet experience encourages a kind of online version of road rage.
'Garbage Social Networks' -- Does That Mean Twitter?
Commentary  |  3/25/2007  | 
The subject line in my email caught my eye immediately: "Thursday -- Garbage Social Networks, E-Flex, and More!" I've been playing with Twitter, and I thought, "Yes! I know just what that means!" It turns out I was wrong: the writer really meant social networks for people interested in reducing the volume of their trash. But I think my version is more interesting, because it explains the incredibly rapid devaluation of social networking as a concept. We really have sunk to the level of garbage s
The Daily Show Looks At The Viacom Lawsuit Against Google's YouTube
Commentary  |  3/23/2007  | 
"The Google guys will be like, yo, check it out, we just put another gold-plated rock-climbing wall in our office. We're CRAZY rich!" Watch the video below the fold.
Furnishing The InformationWeek Office In Second Life
Commentary  |  3/23/2007  | 
I spent some time yesterday furnishing InformationWeek's office -- or, should I say, bureau -- in Second Life. Read on for a photo of our little office, and some discussion of how it came to pass.

Jott Helps Keep Track Of To-Dos When You Can't Write 'Em Down
Commentary  |  3/23/2007  | 
I'm so excited I could just plotz -- I actually had a chance to field-test Jott yesterday and it worked like a champ. Jott is a new service that lets you phone in and record a 15-second sound bite, which it transcribes using speech recognition and then e-mails the text back to you. I used it to record an idea while I was driving to the dentist, and by gosh I had that e-mail waiting for me when I got back to my desk.

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