Commentary
Content posted in December 2005
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Still Don't Believe In RFID?
Commentary  |  12/6/2005  | 
I've said it before. I'll say it again. Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology is going to slam the practice of business intelligence in the supply chain.
SOA And Security
Commentary  |  12/6/2005  | 
We had a couple of terrific how-to features this week for you on SOA Pipeline. The first focuses on security and SOA. Peter Lacey explains why, if your company is ready to begin implementing a true service-oriented architecture (SOA), you'll need to consider what technologies are used to enable messaging and message processing, and how to secure those messages as they flow through the network and are retained in memory or on disk.
Prediction No. 4: A Central Theme
Commentary  |  12/6/2005  | 
After going out on a limb for my third prediction for the new year, I'll make another semi-safe forecast this time around. What compliance management, disaster recovery, and general process optimization has shown us in 2005 is that some data is just better off centralized. At the very least, the views to data need to be centralized, but companies found this year that managing for Section 404 of SOX, or ge
Netflix, You Need To Read This Story
Commentary  |  12/6/2005  | 
Information Week has a story about a new, more scratch-resistant CD. A Colorado company called Scratch-Less Disc Industries is bringing out a CD that uses a special polymer, co-developed by General Electric, that's 100 times harder to scratch than the plastic used for standard CDs -- a resistance to abrasion similar to glass, the company claims. Netflix, are you listening? Get with these people right away and for
Why Wikis Won't Go Away
Commentary  |  12/6/2005  | 
CoPs at the World Bank
Commentary  |  12/6/2005  | 
TV-On-iPod Gets Realer And Realer
Commentary  |  12/6/2005  | 
Don't look now, but Apple is suddenly offering TV shows on iTunes for downloading to and viewing on the new video-capable iPod from NBC, SciFi and USA. It still costs $1.99 per show. (via Engadget)
BlackBerry Protection Is Best Bet
Commentary  |  12/6/2005  | 
It's time for government users to do some contingency planning just in case BlackBerry service is shut down, something Johanna Ambrosio sees as an increasingly real scenario. The good news: alternatives do exist.
Northern Ireland's IT Peace Dividend Could Show The Way Forward in Iraq
Commentary  |  12/5/2005  | 
Belfast, Northern Ireland--An imposing length of concrete still divides much of this city into Protestant and Catholic zones, and many walls on either side still bear graphic murals depicting militant images of 'The Troubles.' But in old stone pubs and newly built office parks, many residents here are now voicing a belief that Northern Island's long history of sectarian violence may be at an end. And it's no coincidence, they say, that this once strife-torn part of the United Kingdom has achieve
Don't Buy That Web Analytics Package Just Yet
Commentary  |  12/5/2005  | 
As most of us know by now, Google has decided to crash yet another party. This time it's not search, Web-based e-mail or classifieds that the Great Disrupter has decided to take on. It's Web analytics. And a lot of firms thinking of buying a new online analytics package should look into Google before making their decision.
Sun Combativeness, Open-Source Peacekeeping A Good Match?
Commentary  |  12/5/2005  | 
Sun Microsystems took the plunge Nov. 30 and committed itself to convert much of its software product line to open-source code. Sun will give you its software ... if only you will use it. As a statement of business strategy, the move sums up multiple past failures, but maybe, just maybe, this time its approach will work.
When (Employment) Statistics Lie
Commentary  |  12/5/2005  | 
What's Wrong With Google's Gmail Anti-Virus?
Commentary  |  12/5/2005  | 
Google rolled out a new anti-virus component to its free e-mail service, Gmail. It augments the old protection, which merely blocks any attached executable file, such as those ending in the .EXE extension. The anti-virus technology provider behind the service is being kept secret. Free e-mail with free anti-virus protection. What's wrong with that?
The Wicked-Pedia
Commentary  |  12/5/2005  | 
The blogosphere is roiled over problems with the Wikipedia, where the ideal that letting anybody write or edit anything will increase the amount of truth in the world collected more than a little tarnish last week. It's hardly surprising. The only safe way to treat the Wikipedia, and the Internet more generally, is as propaganda, because the velocity of the information has reduced civil debate to uncivil sabotage.
Podcast: The Declining Number Of Women Seeking Careers In IT Is An Alarming Trend
Commentary  |  12/4/2005  | 
Women comprise about 29 percent of the professional IT workforce. But there is concern among technology companies the number is shrinking, according to Lucy Sanders, chief executive officer at the National Center for Women and Information Technology. Sanders said non-profit organizations, universities and businesses such as Wal-Mart, Cisco and IBM are working to reverse that trend. IBM and Cisco, for example, are sponsoring studies to gather base line data they will use to develop mentoring pro
Feedback
Commentary  |  12/2/2005  | 
Prediction No. 3: Lockdown On Customer Data
Commentary  |  12/2/2005  | 
This one might put me out on a limb, but I'm going to say that in 2006 we will see a marked reduction in customer data theft cases. Why, because it's on everyone's radar. Today, close to half the states have enacted data privacy laws modeled after California's SB-1386, requiring companies to out themselves when a breach occurs. And late last month, the Senate approved the Personal Data Privacy and Security Act
Business Technology: Self-Evaluation: How'd You Do In 2005?
Commentary  |  12/2/2005  | 
Look back at your work year via these questions and see how you score. Do it before you take out that second mortgage, Bob Evans suggests.
IBM Can't Win With A Thin Envelope
Commentary  |  12/2/2005  | 
IBM has sent a letter to the head of Massachusett's department of Administration and Finance urging him not to be fooled by Microsoft's PR campaign to promote its Office Open XML as an "open" format, and to continue his predecessor's support for the Open Document Format. My guess is IBM made only one mistake -- all it put in the envelope was the letter.
Decline In ISP Workers: Don't Believe It
Commentary  |  12/2/2005  | 
Numbers never tell the whole story. Take, for instance, Friday's Labor Department's payroll report, which lumps together companies offering ISPs, search portals, and data processing hosting services. That segment experienced its second consecutive monthly decline in November. That's strange, considering increased Internet use and the popularity of Google and other portals.
Disintermediation 2.0
Commentary  |  12/2/2005  | 
Global Collaboration - Habitat Jam
Commentary  |  12/2/2005  | 
Outsource Globally to Create Jobs Locally
Commentary  |  12/1/2005  | 
Last week, the city council in Burlington, Vermont passed an "anti-offshoring" ordinance that stipulates that city contracts cannot go to firms that would perform the work overseas. "It is the policy of the City of Burlington to let service contracts to contractors, subcontractors and vendors who perform work in the United States," the ordinance reads.
Why I Hate Microsoft
Commentary  |  12/1/2005  | 
I do not actually HATE Microsoft. I just wrote that headline to get your attention. I even met Bill Gates once and thought he was a really nice guy. Besides, it would be unprofessional of me to be less than objective about a company that I cover day in and day out. And full disclosure requires me to state that over the last 20 years I have received and used copious quantities of free hardware and software from Microsoft (including a special commemorative model of the pistol-grip Microsoft mouse
Born To Collaborate
Commentary  |  12/1/2005  | 
Disintermediation 2.0
Commentary  |  12/1/2005  | 
In the dotcom bubble, a term that cropped up frequently was "disintermediation," the notion of leveraging the power of the Internet to eliminate middlemen that added little value and decreased the efficiency of a business. If you were on the receiving end of it, your business was toast. The concept is worth revisiting today in the context of the classified advertising business of daily newspapers and recent moves by tech giants. The big question: are the dailies being disintermediated in one of
BI In The Supply Chain
Commentary  |  12/1/2005  | 
Lots of companies use business intelligence to track their customers, help with compliance or tackle other operational trends inside the enterprise walls. But what about BI and supply chains? Turns out, supply chains don't lend themselves to analytics as much as many a BI pro might like.
Message to FCC: Stop Hurting VoIP
Commentary  |  12/1/2005  | 
When the FCC mandated enhanced 911 capabilities for VoIP providers, it opened a potentially anti-innovative can of worms commissioners can't solve with one punitive pen stroke. VoIP E911 is a complex problem with no simple answers, but if the FCC wants to keep the burgeoning industry growing quickly, it should stimulate discussion and aid compliance instead of fixing itself into a scolding pattern.
Reaping Revenues From SOA Consulting
Commentary  |  12/1/2005  | 
HP last week was the latest major vendor to plunge into the SOA consulting business. The firm has launched an "application modernization" consulting service for enterprises implementing services-oriented architectures.
Google's "Space" Is (Mostly) Online
Commentary  |  12/1/2005  | 
Microsoft's Ad Plan? It's Classified
Commentary  |  12/1/2005  | 
Is Microsoft's revelation that it is testing a classified ads service conclusive evidence that The House That Bill Built is truly trying to hitch its wagon to advertising revenues? On the one hand, we've got to remember that Microsoft will try anything. I wouldn't be surprised to hear that Microsoft is testing a personal solar-powered microwave coffee warmer. But on the other hand, this feels serious. It feels as se
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