Commentary
Content posted in March 2006
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March Madness Means Internet Madness
Commentary  |  3/22/2006  | 
So who's watching March Madness basketball on their computers? Apparently millions. CBS SportsLine, which is offering games on-demand for free, said some 4 million visitors hit the site in the first four days. That resulted in more than 14 million live video streams being served up. It believes that's more than any live event in Internet history.
Securing A Solution To Data Theft
Commentary  |  3/22/2006  | 
Microsoft's Going Broader, Google's Going Deeper--And Some Mobile Services May Not Go At All
Commentary  |  3/21/2006  | 
The possibilities are endless, and I think Google's really onto something here. It's their core business proposition--search--but with a twist. We'll see what the rest of this year brings along these lines; I've got to believe other themed sites aren't long behind.
Keeping the Phones Ringing
Commentary  |  3/21/2006  | 
Disney To AT&T: Here, Hold My Wallet
Commentary  |  3/21/2006  | 
How much more are you willing to pay for Internet service? If you're Robert Iger, the CEO of Walt Disney, apparently you're willing to pay billions. Iger appeared at TelecomNext yesterday in Las Vegas and said he didn't see a need for any net-neutrality legislation that would keep the big telecoms and cable companies from charging his company whatever they want to to deliver Disney's content to customers.
Outsourcing Is A Win-Win For Business And Consumers, So Why Are Corporations So Shy About Their Offshore Plans?
Commentary  |  3/21/2006  | 
Dell and IBM are set to add thousands of workers to their payrolls in India as they turn more and more work over to the country's low-cost workforce. Surprisingly, and unlike most of their corporate peers, they're coming clean out about their plans. Michael Dell told reporters this week that his company will add 10,000 jobs in India over the next three years. IBM issued a press release heralding a new center in Bangalore that will house all its SOA solutions development. Here's why more companie
Security: A Continuing Federal Challenge
Commentary  |  3/21/2006  | 
While there has been some progress by individual agencies, last year's D+ on the FISMA report card still stands.
Has Google's Privacy Policy Protected Us From Government Surveillance?
Commentary  |  3/20/2006  | 
The District Court ruling that Google doesn’t have to turn over any search records to the Bush administration isn’t just a victory for Web surfers who don’t like the thought of being tracked by the government. It's a victory for anyone who stores data and doesn’t want to be h
What's Wrong With This Picture
Commentary  |  3/20/2006  | 
Focus, Focus, Focus
Commentary  |  3/20/2006  | 
Bill Gates On Blogging, Enterprise Data Search, And Why Client-Server Apps Still Matter
Commentary  |  3/20/2006  | 
It's decision time again for people who buy, manage, and use Microsoft's Office applications suite. Three years after introducing Office 2003, Microsoft is readying an upgrade in the form of Office 2007, a collection of about 15 desktop applications, five server applications, and middleware called Windows SharePoint Services that runs in the Windows Server operating system and ties those applications together with added functionality. I grabbed the chance last week to sit down with Microsoft cha
Comments From Our Blog
Commentary  |  3/17/2006  | 
Community Feedback
Commentary  |  3/17/2006  | 
Readers Defend XBRL
Commentary  |  3/17/2006  | 
A story we ran this week about XBRL managed to ignite a little controversy, even before it made our newsletter.
The Elephant in the Board Room
Commentary  |  3/16/2006  | 
Gates Slings Mud at $100 PC, Winds Up Muddy
Commentary  |  3/16/2006  | 
Bill Gates, chairman of Microsoft, stopped off in Washington yesterday to push his company's Origami project at his company's Government Leaders Forum. Although generally a pretty classy guy, Gates followed Intel Chairman Craig Barrett down the low road to take some cheap shots at Nicholas Negroponte's One-Laptop-Per-Child $100 laptop project as a way of building up Origami. Sorry, Bill, but when you got a dog that won't hunt
Hot Apps: Dragon NaturallySpeaking 8 Preferred
Commentary  |  3/16/2006  | 
Speech-recognition software can be useful in many applications, but its potential remains unfulfilled.
Can't We All Just Get Along (Online And In The Air)?
Commentary  |  3/15/2006  | 
Manners, or rather, the lack of them, have been all over our news pages the last two weeks. The topics covered won't surprise anyone, although the proposed remedies might. And yet when all is said and done, what's really needed isn't some time-consuming legal maneuver or more reams of survey data, but rather a dose of good old common sense served up with a dollop of common courtesy.
Tech History Made Yesterday
Commentary  |  3/15/2006  | 
Most of the Big Events in technology history appear big only in retrospect. For example, for technology historians the day Google.com first came online (September 15, 1997) is obviously a historic milestone. But at the time the number of people who were even aware of it was insufficient to form a basketball team. The date became important only because of what happened later. So remember the date March 14, 2006.
Keeping Kids Safe Online
Commentary  |  3/15/2006  | 
Keeping Kids Safe Online
Commentary  |  3/14/2006  | 
These days, we're all somewhat wiser about the risks of online chat rooms. My girls are now helping their friends understand what they've learned about how to be more responsible young adults. However sad I am that they needed to have learned this particular lesson, I'm very glad they did.
There's More To Social Networking Than Hype
Commentary  |  3/14/2006  | 
I must confess to some skepticism about social networking. Like many caught up in the hype, I joined a social networking service last year. I then proceeded to not use it. I'm probably not the ideal candidate for social networking. I'm not in sales. I don't research companies to invest in. And I'm not currently looking for a job. What's more, as a journalist, it's usually fairly easy to get access to people. I'm not about to start paying to
Fast Macs, Slow Software?
Commentary  |  3/14/2006  | 
A study says that if Intel-based Macs could run Windows applications as fast as Windows PCs, Apple could sell a million more machines this year. I don't doubt that. And if wishes were horses, beggars would ride. The Intel Macs are faster. But there seems to be a problem: they don't run all Mac software faster.
Michigan's Anti-Outsourcing Legislation Would Cost More Jobs Than It Would Save
Commentary  |  3/14/2006  | 
Democrats in the Michigan state senate on Monday introduced anti-outsourcing bills designed to put more of the state's residents out of work while raising their taxes. OK, that's not what the bills are "designed" to do, but that surely would be the outcome if they become law. And this from a party that offshored its leadership to Canada!
Careers: You Vs. Offshoring
Commentary  |  3/14/2006  | 
Mini Displays Coming to Laptops
Commentary  |  3/14/2006  | 
Most cool new clamshell cell phones these days have a big display inside, and a small one outside. The outside display shows the time, or Caller ID info. It's a great idea that people seem to like. Don't look now, but the same idea is coming to Windows-based notebook PCs!
Cisco Enters The Ring On Net Neutrality
Commentary  |  3/14/2006  | 
Cisco Systems CEO John Chambers has joined the carrier echo on network neutrality. Blocking and impairing is bad, freedom to manage crowded networks and create quality-of-service agreements with content providers is good (and different from the first). Don't legislate against hypotheticals.
Is Search An Experience?
Commentary  |  3/14/2006  | 
Intermec Talks New RFID Products For 2006
Commentary  |  3/13/2006  | 
From small portable printers to huge forklifts, Intermec Corp. will RFID-enable more mobile devices this year, says Mike Wills, Intermec's vice president of global services, radio frequency identification, and intellectual property. To download or listen to the podcast, click here. To keep informed on enterprise applications, click here
Don't Overlook Project Management Applications
Commentary  |  3/13/2006  | 
The first, and potentially highest, hurdle in shifting compliance management from a labor-intensive manual activity to an automated process is defining the scope of the project. That entails chores like identifying stakeholders and their roles, setting milestones and determining things like workflow and sign-offs. In fact, this is where many companies pressing toward compliance automation get stuck and flounder. And when sighting down on a compliance problem, it's easy to overlook some obvious
Careers: You Vs. Offshoring
Commentary  |  3/13/2006  | 
IT pros have to live segmented lives. As business people, they need to accept offshoring. It's a viable business strategy, and opposing it makes as much sense as being categorically against just-in-time inventory. But as individuals with careers on the line, they need to view their entire IT careers as a stark battle against offshoring--constantly assessing the risk of their particular job being moved, and positioning their skills and roles to guard against that.
Origami, Or Microsoft Bob 2006
Commentary  |  3/13/2006  | 
Cyber Society
Commentary  |  3/13/2006  | 
The Tech-Savvy Presidential Candidate
Commentary  |  3/12/2006  | 
Mark Warner is mostly known within political circles these days as the anti-Hillary, but the ex-Democratic governor of Virginia has strong IT credentials that would make him the first former high-tech executive to call 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue home. Of course, he faces numerous obstacles in his still-unannounced quest for the White House, most notably grabbing the Democratic Party nomination from front-runner Hillary Clinton, let alone ousting the GOP hold on the federal government.
Down To Business: When Fighting The Good Fight Isn't Worth It
Commentary  |  3/10/2006  | 
When you're hauled into court, you don't always get justice. RIM learned that lesson the hard way. Will Microsoft?
Community Feedback
Commentary  |  3/10/2006  | 
From Our Blog
Commentary  |  3/10/2006  | 
Biggest And Smallest USB Drives Unveiled
Commentary  |  3/10/2006  | 
Those handy USB memory drives -- which have largely replaced "floppies" for the quick-and-dirty transfer of files from one PC to another -- come in a variety of sizes and storage capacities. The current smallest size, and also the largest capacity, memory drives have been unveiled by two different companies at the giant German trade show, CeBIT.
The Stripper And Bill Gates
Commentary  |  3/10/2006  | 
Reading over the recent blog entry by InformationWeek Editor-in-Chief Rob Preston, I found myself thinking of a certain ex-stripper from Texas, and wondering who's got more business sense--the stripper or Bill Gates?
You Can't Be Steve Jobs, But This Is Close
Commentary  |  3/10/2006  | 
You want to be Steve Jobs. You can admit it. Everybody does. You want to wear the jeans, the black mock-turtleneck sweater, and the frameless eyeglasses. You want people to say your products are insanely great. You want to have a cult following. Well, you can't be Steve, but you can create your own Steve Jobs presentation using the Steve Jobs Soundboard, mixing and matching Steve-isms like "We're super-excited about it" and "But there is one more
Technicolor Digital Cinema Lab Launched To Debug Technology
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
Thomson's Technicolor Digital Cinema division held a press conference on Wednesday to unveil its new digital cinema test Center lab in Burbank, Calif.
Origami, Or Microsoft Bob 2006
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
The most interesting thing about Origami is how Microsoft manipulated bloggers and journalists into hyping it. Far from the Transformer gadget hinted at (Eight toys in one! Changes from iPod to camcorder to computer and back!), the device is just a small Tablet PC. And Microsoft's only actual new product is a software suite intended to further dumb down Windows XP's user interface.

Cyber Society
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
As I was picking through a stack of newspapers I was getting ready to recycle this past weekend, I kept seeing examples of how advances in high technology and its movement beyond the workplace are creating new opportunities for the good, the bad, and the ever rude. It's also starting to spur debate about appropriate applications of some of this technology, while also bringing to a head the issue of how best to deal with some of the fallout. The kinds of questions that come to mind include:
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