Commentary
Content posted in March 2006
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Langa Letter: How To Safely Add Or Replace A Hard Drive
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
Want to expand your PC without having to rebuild your operating system? Fred Langa shows you how to do that--and more.
But What About The One-Man Helicopters?
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
I think about the movie The Road Warrior whenever I pass through places where business users and students gather--coffee shops, airport gates, hotel lobbies, and trade show common areas. In The Road Warrior, Mel Gibson and groups of scruffy post-nuclear mutants wandered the Australian outback, clad in fabulous leather couture, fighting for dwindling supplies of gasoline. And that's the scene wherever people gather to use mobile computers. Those places are bleak, Darwinian lands
Finally: A Camera Phone For Klutzes
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
A cool, ruggedized and water-resistant camera phone that's very popular in Japan and Korea called the Casio Hitachi NX9200 was approved today by the FCC for sale in the United States. Here's why you're going to want this phone.
Wikis At Work
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
You might be interested to know that your business intelligence peers are investigating how to use wikis in the business environment. Or at least that's what the high level of interest in one of our recent stories indicates.
Origami PR Campaign Is a Puzzlement
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
Microsoft has done a masterful job of manipulating the buzz around its Origami project. It's got the press playing "Where Is Carmen Sandeiego," tracking a flurry of rumors and sightings of the diminutive touchscreen PC all around the world. Our Man In San Francisco, Paul Kapustka, even got a sighting of his own at the Intel Developer's Conference. And here are the pictures.
ICANN's (Not So) Evil Twin?
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
Good things come to those who wait -- or who just take months to stumble across a "good thing." Case in point: This interview with Stanford University Law Professor Lawrence Lessig, posted last November on the Foreign Policy Web site.
Things I Never Thought I'd See
Commentary  |  3/9/2006  | 
By The Numbers: IBM Getting Bigger In India, Smaller In The U.S.
Commentary  |  3/8/2006  | 
Whoa! In the course of reporting that IBM plans to move all the design and development of its business consulting offerings to India, one company exec told me that IBM's current employment growth rate in the country will continue "for quite some time." So let's look at what that means.
Google's Slip-pery Slope
Commentary  |  3/8/2006  | 
Free, Easy and LEGAL Phone Hacking (To Bypass IVR, Reach Human)
Commentary  |  3/7/2006  | 
When you think of "hacking," you probably imagine a dark underground of technical criminals abusing computer skills to break into, steal or deface company data and web sites. When "hacking" is done with telephones, it's called "phreaking," and it's always just as illegal... Or is it? I'm going to tell you about an ethical form of phone phreaking that's legal, easy, free and -- best of all -- helps you escape from that prison of automated responses you get when you call many large companies.
Google's Slip-pery Slope
Commentary  |  3/7/2006  | 
Google in many ways has positioned itself as the industry's anti-Microsoft. Since its inception, it hasn't been given to preannouncing products or features years in advance, then watching as the starstruck masses hung on every move related to those (oft-delayed) products. Its corporate credo of "Don't Be Evil" comes off as the antithesis to the evil empire in Redmond (though recent events in China raise questions
Indian Bloggers Weigh In On Bush, Outsourcing, Nukes
Commentary  |  3/7/2006  | 
There are many reasons why India is a natural ally and trading partner for the United States. Its progressive economy, IT and outsourcing prowess, and English language affinity are among them. Most important, India is a fully functioning democracy. Its freedom of expression was on display last week during President Bush's visit. Indian bloggers were quick to voice their thoughts on the summit and related issues. Many praised the growing ties between the United States and India, while others cond
Ch-Ch-Changes At CA
Commentary  |  3/7/2006  | 
This week's cover story on CA portrays the company formerly known as Computer Associates as a work in progress, transitioning from brute force to a kinder, more innovative machine. Yet it also shows customer opinion often lags behind major shifts in the way vendors do business.
Is RFID Secure Enough For Government Use?
Commentary  |  3/7/2006  | 
With RFID use in the military going through the roof, I have to wonder about the security ramifications of a technology that hasn't yet been put through its full paces.
SAP Calls Nucleus Report 'Junk Science'
Commentary  |  3/7/2006  | 
Since we got our hands on a Nucleus Research report that claims SAP customers are 20% less profitable than their peers, we've had a chance to talk to SAP about it. "Their research is like comparing apples to rotten oranges," says SAP spokesperson Bill Wohl. "They [analyzed] 1/25th of a percent of SAP customers--81 out of 30K, and from that small slice they've concluded that SAP customers are less profitable."
Reality IT: Quelling The Boss' Open-Source Fears
Commentary  |  3/6/2006  | 
Executives may not realize just how much their firms' networks and other systems rely upon open-source software. When they do find out, it may be up to you to give them some timely reassurance.
BlackBerry Case: Not Good Sign For Patent Challengers
Commentary  |  3/6/2006  | 
BlackBerry maker Research In Motion's decision to settle with NTP for $615 million in an infringement case involving wireless E-mail patents is good news for the likes of Tom Woolston, Dick Snyder, and Neil Balthaser. All three hold patents on IT that others contend they don't deserve.
RIM-Vs.-NTP: And The Winner Is . . . Neither
Commentary  |  3/6/2006  | 
Who was the big winner in the RIM-NTP Inc. patent suit? It wasn't NTP. It looks to me like the patent troll folded and made a quick grab for some cash before RIM took it all off the table. And it wasn't RIM. The real damage to the BlackBerry company's business wasn't the $612-plus million it agreed to pay NTP. It was surely an amount several times that — whatever dollar value you assign to the damage done to its customer relationships, which was considerable. So who was the big winner? My t
Why I Hate Open Source Routing
Commentary  |  3/6/2006  | 
RFID, The Newest Four-Letter Word
Commentary  |  3/6/2006  | 
Have you heard the latest buzz on the newest four-letter word, RFID, also known as radio frequency identification technology?
Has Time Stood Still?
Commentary  |  3/5/2006  | 
From Our Blog
Commentary  |  3/3/2006  | 
Community Feedback
Commentary  |  3/3/2006  | 
Google, MySpace Come Crashing Back To Earth
Commentary  |  3/3/2006  | 
Google has some maturing to do. It needs to prove to corporate America that it understands the needs of large companies and is committed to making whatever software it provides a success in the enterprise environment. That includes helping make the software secure and not shifting the total burden onto the customer.
Microsoft's Losing European Battle
Commentary  |  3/3/2006  | 
Microsoft is escalating its 2-year-old war with Europe's trustbusters, charging in a 16-page complaint that the European Commission schemed with the software giant's rivals in trying to discredit Microsoft's compliance with the EC's 2004 antitrust decision.
Podcast: Interview With Peter Rojas
Commentary  |  3/3/2006  | 
Tech hardware blog Engadget turns two today, or so co-founder and editor-in-chief Peter Rojas reports. Coincidentally, Engadget is number two on Technorati's list of the most popular blogs. I interviewed Peter Rojas for an upcoming Q&A in InformationWeek's print edition, and that conversation can be heard as a
Itanium And Integrity--Who Are Intel And HP Trying To Convince?
Commentary  |  3/3/2006  | 
Itanium and Integrity won't go down from a lack of effort or commitment from its two creators and largest proponents, Intel and Hewlett-Packard. After Thursday's Webcast conference, one lingering impression was that the two companies may be trying as hard to convince themselves as the public that they haven't wasted billions of dollars in what has now become a decades-long effort to establish a new processor architecture.
What If Microsoft Repackaged The iPod?
Commentary  |  3/3/2006  | 
With so much speculation about Microsoft's mysterious Origami Project possibly being an iPod killer (unlike this origami project), I'd be remiss if I didn't point readers to this hilarious video where someone took the time to answer the question I pose in the
In Due Order
Commentary  |  3/2/2006  | 
A big majority of the data stored by most organizations is either unstructured, like information on paper, or semi-structured, as in e-mails. But more and more companies want to be able to analyze those disorderly data sets.
Net Neutrality Finds A Champion
Commentary  |  3/2/2006  | 
Just when I was gloomily thinking that the only politicians interested in net neutrality were those being paid by telcos and cable companies to bury it, something really unusual has happened: A senator has stepped forward to champion the interests of citizens rather than corporate lobbyists. Senator Ron Wyden, Democrat of Oregon, says he's introducing legislation to prohibit Internet network operators from charging companies for faster delivery of their content to Internet users.
How To Punch Through Spam Filters
Commentary  |  3/2/2006  | 
Tips for making sure your legitimate bulk e-mail gets through to its recipients, and doesn't end up in the garbage with the mortgage pitches and Viagra ads.
Get Set To Pay More For High-Bandwidth Internet Use
Commentary  |  3/2/2006  | 
Consumers seeking to download heavy-duty apps such as streaming video could find themselves paying much more for their Internet service than those who simply want to surf the Web.
Microsoft Will Stumble On Windows Vista And Office 2007
Commentary  |  3/1/2006  | 
The thing about the story of the boy who cried wolf is that the wolf eventually showed up. Every time Microsoft updates Windows and Office, pessimists say customers won't adopt the new version. This trend goes back more than a decade. It happened with Windows 95, with Windows 98, with Windows ME, and with Windows XP. And the pessimists have been wrong every time. But this time around, it's looking like the pessimistic view is the right one. Neither Vista nor the upcoming Office 2007 offers co
When Is A Security Update Not A Security Update?
Commentary  |  3/1/2006  | 
Question: when is a security update not a security update? Answer: when it's an update to Internet Explorer. Microsoft Tuesday released an update to IE that forces the user to explicitly approve the execution of some Active-X controls. That's a security update in my book. Microsoft is splitting hairs by saying it doesn't protect the browser. It protects the user, and that's what's important.
Microsoft Invents E-Mail You Use With Your Feet
Commentary  |  3/1/2006  | 
Microsoft invests billions in its awesome research wing. Some of the inventions developed there are stunning -- awe inspiring. But one invention I discovered today is, well, not so hot. It's e-mail software that you manipulate with your feet using a Dance Dance Revolution game pad.
Simple Ideas Can Be Big Ideas
Commentary  |  3/1/2006  | 
As we continue to find out, there are many ways to skin the compliance cat, especially when it comes to archiving. And every once in a while simple ideas crop up that are relatively inexpensive to deploy and can really help the compliance cause. Here's an example: We've all heard that archiving is less than half the battle in proving compliance with several key regulations. Once the data is archived, you have to be able to quickly search and discover the files critical to any ongoing litigation
Commentary: The Chief Offshore Information Officer?
Commentary  |  3/1/2006  | 
How far can offshoring go in the IT world? Some new data suggests that the threat is greatly exaggerated.
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