Commentary
Content posted in April 2006
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ChoicePoint For Our Safety?
Commentary  |  4/7/2006  | 
Why on earth would the federal government choose to sign a multimillion-dollar contract with a company that just a year ago suffered a data breach affecting almost 150,000 Americans? I don't know, but that's exactly what it has done.
No Laptop Left Behind
Commentary  |  4/7/2006  | 
I wrote recently about Nicholas Negroponte's One Laptop Per Child initiative, and snarky responses to it from Intel's Chairman Craig Barrett and Microsoft's Chairman Bill Gates. Then I went snarky myself on Intel's Community PC platform for India. I'm happy to report two follow-ups: Negroponte took the high road in his res
Comparative Review: The Myth And Magic Of CPU Performance
Commentary  |  4/7/2006  | 
When a 1.83 GHz Core Duo T2400 can outperform a Pentium 4 640 overclocked to 3.56 GHz, the world has turned upside down.
Microsoft's BI Play
Commentary  |  4/6/2006  | 
First, it was Oracle. Now, it's Microsoft.
Crossing Borders
Commentary  |  4/6/2006  | 
Wireless Challenges: What Mobile Users Really Think
Commentary  |  4/5/2006  | 
While moderating a Birds of a Feather Session (BOFS) at the InformationWeek Spring Conference in Amelia Island, Fla., this week, I presented the attendees with a list of wireless challenges in hopes of shining a light of realism on hype around mobile applications, dual-mode handsets, WiMax, and municipal Wi-Fi. But apparently the challenges don't stop there.
Truckin' And 'Pot'
Commentary  |  4/5/2006  | 
If you're in IT, and if you're a member of the team working on your company's Web site and you think it's boring, chances are good others will, too. Don't be afraid to suggest things (particularly to the marketing types--they're generally open to ideas). Take a lesson from some other corporate folks who are pushing the edge a bit. It just might work. It might also get you some positive attention from the business types, and that's always a good thing.
Apple Offers Windows On Macs
Commentary  |  4/5/2006  | 
Apple's new Intel Macs can now officially run Windows. The computer company today introduced a public beta of Boot Camp, software that lets licensed users of Microsoft Windows XP install Windows on their Intel-based Macs. The result is a computer that can boot Mac OS X or Windows. The Internet community has been feverishly trying to create just such a chimera since Apple announced its Intel-based Macs in January. One site,
Casting About
Commentary  |  4/5/2006  | 
How To Open Up The Floodgates
Commentary  |  4/5/2006  | 
Don't Put That In Your Mouth, You Don't Know Where It's Been
Commentary  |  4/4/2006  | 
One of the major objections to open source is that nobody's responsible for the code. Enterprise users need to be sure that the software they're deploying is secure. The way they do that for proprietary code is to bind the authors with contracts, requiring the authors to guarantee that the code has been reviewed for security. But you can't do that with open source because anyone can contribute to open source, and, ultimately, there's no single party that can be held responsible for the software'
Enterprise Software Wakes Up From Nap Time, Wants Juice And A Cookie
Commentary  |  4/4/2006  | 
It's very satisfying to hear an observation that's both completely new and--once you hear it--blindingly obvious. Jason Maynard, a software analyst for Credit Suisse, did that for me at the InformationWeek Spring Conference this week when he observed that there's been almost no innovation in enterprise software for the past five years or so. With the exception of the RIM BlackBerry, the enterprise sof
Casting About
Commentary  |  4/4/2006  | 
Last week those of us who opine in the InformationWeek Daily newsletter each day reached something of an internal milestone: our 100th Daily news podcast. That's 20 weeks' worth of audio versions of our flagship newsletter (all of which are available here).
How To Implement SOA And Get Fired
Commentary  |  4/4/2006  | 
Let's say you hate your job and want to get yourself canned so you can get yourself some of that sweet unemployment insurance. Experts on a panel on service-oriented architecture at the InformationWeek Spring Conference Tuesday offered some handy tips to ease you on the road to unemployment.
U.S. Needs More H-1B Workers Or More Offshore Outsourcing: Take Your Pick
Commentary  |  4/4/2006  | 
As Congress considers a massive expansion of the H-1B visa worker program, opponents of the plan should consider this: Failure by federal lawmakers to allow more skilled IT workers into the country will result in more U.S. corporations simply outsourcing their computer work to India or some other offshore locale where skilled help is plentiful and cheap. Is that what you really want?
Ethics Aren't Just For The Classroom
Commentary  |  4/4/2006  | 
Weird News Of The Wired
Commentary  |  4/4/2006  | 
Video Blogging
Commentary  |  4/3/2006  | 
It's been interesting to watch the entertainment industry adopt digital technology. Growing up in Los Angeles, I spent many years close to those in the industry who would eventually go on to spur adoption. Recently, I discovered a new form of digital expression.
Globalization, Or Sailed Ships And Election-Year Politics
Commentary  |  4/3/2006  | 
The questions need to be about what technology we must keep to be safe, and how much we're willing to fork over to keep it that way. They don't need to be about who can rabble-rouse the most and who can pose as a strongman.
SAS Institute: It Used To Be Technology That Rocked
Commentary  |  4/3/2006  | 
When the 30th SAS Institute user group convened in San Francisco on March 26, I hadn't attended a SUGI (SAS User Group International) gathering for over a decade. So let's say the high production values of its opening session--the big-time, high-fidelity sound system, slick video effects, and theatrically staged customer awards--were a shock.
How To Open Up The Floodgates
Commentary  |  4/3/2006  | 
Do you wish you had more junk mail? Not enough spam clogging your E-mail box? Do you want a wider variety of marketing solicitations? Well, help is on the way! When you sit down to do your 2006 federal income taxes, make sure you do a good job. We wouldn't want any erroneous information going out to the reams of buyers lining up in hopes of buying what the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) calls "the map to your life."
The Hardest-Working Man In The Software Industry
Commentary  |  4/3/2006  | 
Al J. Monserrat is the hardest-working man in the software industry. Monserrat is vice president and general manager for North America for Citrix Systems. During a brief lunch presentation at the InformationWeek Spring Conference at Amelia Island, Fla., on Monday, Monserrat described how his company's products helped him keep working during Hurricane Wilma. While the wind and rain bore down on his Fort Lauderdale, Fla., home, Monserrat kept working.
Which PDA Should I Buy?
Commentary  |  4/3/2006  | 
I need a new PDA. And I need your help. My old Palm Vx is getting flakier and flakier. Now almost every time I open it up I have to do a reset and retrain the digitizer, because the touchscreen loses the settings that tell it what object on the screen I'm selecting. I've looked at the current Palms, and the current crop of Pocket PCs, and I can't make up my mind. If you have one of these, would you mind answering three questions? (1) Would I really use fancy features like WiFi access and a buil
The Fine Line Of Ethics: When Should It Be Crossed?
Commentary  |  4/3/2006  | 
There's too much gray in ethics, you think? Defining that fine line between right and wrong troubles many executives. Just ask those at Morgan Stanley, the investment bank embroiled in a lawsuit involving business and IT executives who accepted gifts from a vendor.
Are There Some Things Man Was Not Meant To Know?
Commentary  |  4/2/2006  | 
Listening to genetics pioneer Craig Venter describe the future of biological engineering, any reasonable person has to ask whether to move forward with this new industry.
Virtual Confusion In The Data Center?
Commentary  |  4/2/2006  | 
It's virtually impossible to talk about the state of current and future data centers without virtualization being the first word heard from IT professionals, analysts, and the media. But the degree to which virtualization is actually being deployed by businesses today is widely debated, and it's increasingly difficult to project which virtualization software company will emerge as the dominate force over the next few years.
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