Commentary
Content posted in September 2006
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IT Confidential: Last DOS Standing
Commentary  |  9/15/2006  | 
Microsoft products don't get old, they get better--don't they?
Apple's Future Phone
Commentary  |  9/15/2006  | 
It's pretty much a given these days that Apple is hard at work on a mobile phone. The company won't acknowledge this, but it's hard to find an Apple rumor site or financial analyst covering Apple that hasn't speculated about the iPhone or whatever the fabled device eventually ends up being called. Despite its studied coyness, Apple in
Thank Heaven For The Web
Commentary  |  9/14/2006  | 
A significant tech anniversary quietly slipped by last month. Fifteen years ago, Tim Berners-Lee made public a little project he was working on. He called it the WorldWideWeb.
Plugging into Sametime
Commentary  |  9/14/2006  | 
Author Peters Puts Both IBM And Microsoft On The 'Guarded' List:
Commentary  |  9/13/2006  | 
In Search of Excellence author Tom Peters is no admirer of GM. But he suggested there were two computer industry behemoths out there that may be teetering on the verge of decline as well. One was IBM, due to its increasing dependence on services revenue. But also put on the "guarded" list was Microsoft.
A New Path To SOA: Follow The Customer Data
Commentary  |  9/12/2006  | 
If you get enough smart people in a room, one thing becomes clear: There's a simpler way to SOA. At the IW 500 conference, some smart people chose a customer- and data-centric path to their service orientation.
Desktop Defectors
Commentary  |  9/12/2006  | 
Recently, I wrote a story about the vulnerabilities of Web applications in which Alan Paller, director of research at the SANS Institute, predicted, "Security will drive people to centralized applications." That's in fact what I'm hearing from some of the attendees at the 2006 InformationWeek Fall Conference. The difficulty
With Help From IBM, U.S. Biz Schools Teach Grads How To Move Jobs Offshore
Commentary  |  9/12/2006  | 
While outsourcing technology work to low-cost countries like India can help companies cut costs and improve productivity, many such efforts go awry because they're not properly managed. The problem is that overseeing an offshore workforce takes multidisciplinary skills that few of today's managers possess. Several well-known biz schools, with help from IBM, are trying to change that.
Buy Low, Spam High
Commentary  |  9/12/2006  | 
As HP's CIO, Randy Mott Hasn't Changed His Outsourcing Stripes
Commentary  |  9/11/2006  | 
At Wal-Mart and at Dell, Randy Mott kept IT work in-house, with almost no outsourcing. He's got the same game plan for HP.
The $60,000 Question
Commentary  |  9/9/2006  | 
Community Feedback
Commentary  |  9/8/2006  | 
From Our Blog
Commentary  |  9/8/2006  | 
Down To Business: Are You IW500 Material?
Commentary  |  9/8/2006  | 
Our annual ranking of the most innovative tech organizations bucks some of the conventional wisdom. Same for the tech leaders behind those organizations.
Bungling Bureaucrats
Commentary  |  9/8/2006  | 
Where Gutenberg Led, Google Follows
Commentary  |  9/8/2006  | 
IT Managers Appear To Be Everywhere
Commentary  |  9/8/2006  | 
The Achilles' Heel Of Online Storage: Network Bandwidth
Commentary  |  9/7/2006  | 
Someday you'll be able to access all your files from any Internet-connected device. Just don't hold your breath. Despite the commoditization of digital storage, backing up and accessing files across the Internet remains difficult and unwieldy when it comes to large amounts of data. But take heart. The ability to automatically back up files and sync them across devices will be here well before the paperless office and flying cars. Perhaps even before the arrival of
Decisions, Decisions
Commentary  |  9/7/2006  | 
I don't know about you, but whenever I go to Dell's, HP's, or any other major PC manufacturer's Web site to look at new computers, I get a little overwhelmed with all the decisions I have to make. Do I want a home office or a small business computer? Media center capabilities or a machine that's all business? And those are the easy questions--after that come the big decisions: CPU and memory.
Stakes Small, But Outcome Huge In Model Railroad Software Fight
Commentary  |  9/6/2006  | 
Who owns exclusive rights to model railroad software? On March 11, 2003, the U.S. Patent Office came up with the answer to that question when it issued patent 6,530,329 to Matthew Katzer of Portland, Ore. There's something worrisome about that decision. Model railroads work on a scale whose complexity we ought to be able to grasp.
Bungling Bureaucrats And IT Debacles
Commentary  |  9/6/2006  | 
Just when you think the business and IT incompetence of bureaucrats can't get any more profound, they come roaring back to exceed our expectations.
It's a Wonder We Get Any Work Done
Commentary  |  9/6/2006  | 
FreeDOS 1.0 Released
Commentary  |  9/5/2006  | 
The open-source DOS replacement project has reached its first major milestone, and FreeDOS version 1.0 is now available. The distribution seeks to provide a functional drop-in replacement for MS-DOS, but also adds several new utilities and features, such as support for FAT32 partitions and long file names.
Indian Schools Ditch Microsoft For Linux, Kill Golden Goose
Commentary  |  9/4/2006  | 
Cows are sacred in India, but apparently not geese--especially the gilded variety. Proving that $1.7 billion doesn't go as far as it used to in winning over foreign governments--that's the amount Bill Gates last year pledged to invest in India--a school district in the country is set to rid its computers of Microsoft Windows and install Linux instead.
Down To Business: FCC Rakes In More Billions, But At What Cost?
Commentary  |  9/1/2006  | 
Latest series of spectrum auctions adds another $13 billion tax on wireless operators and customers. Still, the process could be a lot worse.
Community Feedback
Commentary  |  9/1/2006  | 
From Our Blog
Commentary  |  9/1/2006  | 
Wireless Broadband Hasn't Lived Up To Expectations...Yet
Commentary  |  9/1/2006  | 
The top cellular carriers all claim to have launched wireless broadband services, but they're still mostly intended for laptop users who are limited by not-so-bandwidth-intensive applications or on-the-go Web access. A desktop-type experience on mobile devices won't come to fruition for another couple of years, until WiMax and the ilk start delivering better network
The Distant Vista: Visions Of Heaven From The Gates Of Hades
Commentary  |  9/1/2006  | 
The most striking thing about Aaron Ricadela's excellent article about the future of Windows was the dramatic discrepancy between what Windows is and what it could (must) become.
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