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10/17/2007
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AT&T Adds GPS To BlackBerry Curve

With built-in GPS, users can now use location-based applications and services such as turn-by-turn voice and on-screen directions, moving maps, and traffic alerts with rerouting options.

AT&T on Wednesday introduced a new BlackBerry Curve model that has built-in GPS intended for use with location-based applications and services.




AT&T's BlackBerry Curve 8310 has built-in GPS intended for use with location-based applications and services.
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The BlackBerry Curve 8310 is practically identical to the BlackBerry Curve 8300, which first made its debut in the United States also through AT&T in May, with the exception of the GPS capability.

With built-in GPS, AT&T customers can now use location-based applications and services. One such service is the TeleNav GPS Navigator, which uses GPS to serve up turn-by-turn voice and on-screen directions, moving maps, and traffic alerts with rerouting options. The monthly service costs $6 for 10 trips or $10 for unlimited trips.

The consumer-focused smartphone incorporates features that could appeal to businesses as well. It comes with Research In Motion's BlackBerry e-mail and messaging capabilities.

Other features include a 2-megapixel camera with 5x digital zoom, a media player, desktop media manager software, a microSD memory slot for additional storage, and stereo Bluetooth. But the Curve 8310 works on AT&T's slower EDGE network and it doesn't have integrated Wi-Fi, which is a major drawback for a multimedia-centric device that requires high-speed data access.

Those in need of a Wi-Fi-enabled BlackBerry Curve can get one from T-Mobile, which has been selling its Curve 8320 model since last month, though it doesn't have built-in GPS.

The Curve 8310 costs $200 with a two-year subscription to AT&T and mail-in rebate.

Sprint last week expanded its own BlackBerry offerings with the addition of the BlackBerry Pearl 8130, a thin cell phone-like smartphone that offers all the features a mobile professional needs combined with music, TV, and navigation services.

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