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 Thomas Claburn
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Profile of Thomas Claburn

Editor at Large, Enterprise Mobility
Member Since: 11/15/2013
Author
News & Commentary Posts: 4108
Comments: 1013

Thomas Claburn has been writing about business and technology since 1996, for publications such as New Architect, PC Computing, InformationWeek, Salon, Wired, and Ziff Davis Smart Business. Before that, he worked in film and television, having earned a not particularly useful master's degree in film production. He wrote the original treatment for 3DO's Killing Time, a short story that appeared in On Spec, and the screenplay for an independent film called The Hanged Man, which he would later direct. He's the author of a science fiction novel, Reflecting Fires, and a sadly neglected blog, Lot 49. His iPhone game, Blocfall, is available through the iTunes App Store. His wife is a talented jazz singer; he does not sing, which is for the best.

Articles by Thomas Claburn
posted in April 2007

Google Gets Personal With iGoogle

4/30/2007
Google also introduced Gadget Maker and seven gadget templates, including a photo gadget, a greeting gadget, a blogging gadget, a list gadget, a countdown gadget, a YouTube gadget, and a free form gadget.

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Google To Launch iGoogle

4/30/2007
At a brunch for journalists (where I am typing this), Google today rolled out new personalization applications and features that are scheduled to go live first thing Tuesday morning. First, the Google Personalized Home Page, previously known as IG because those two characters are at the end of the Personalized Home Page URL (www.google.com/ig), has formally become iGoogle. If you thought Froogle was a poor product name, be thankful Google rejected Yougle, Fusion, and Mockingbird for the rename

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Dear Microsoft: Enough With The Interactive TV

4/27/2007
Dear Microsoft, Thank you for your concern about the lack of interactivity in my television. I realize that your researchers have only my best interests at heart, but please tell them that interactivity isn't necessary. TV is passive entertainment and I'm fine with that. If I want to interact, I'll do so using the computer in my home office, or maybe, if I'm feeling decadent, from my laptop while watching TV.

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Adobe Opens Flex

4/26/2007
Adobe is set to release the source code for its Flex development framework under the Mozilla Public License.

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Too Many Writers Spoil The Story

4/24/2007
Blogger Jason Calcanis recently refused to be interviewed over the phone by Wired contributing editor Fred Vogelstein. Calcanis prefers e-mail. As Calcanis explained in an e-mail to Vogelstein, "I'm an email guy like dave winer.. And I own my words as well, and often print them on my blog (after stories come out)."

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Do Analysts Matter?

4/17/2007
If you want to make it as a Web 2.0 company, find a way to get a positive review from Michael Arrington, the well-known Silicon Valley entrepreneur and founder of TechCrunch. Arrington, it seems, has become the tech industry equivalent of Robert Parker, the influential wine critic whose tastes have shaped that industry. Not so long ago, Gartner could make or break a company. Not so much an

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CitizenHawk Takes On The Typo Economy

4/13/2007
It's clear that typo squatting is a real and growing problem. The World Intellectual Property Organization said in March that cybersquatting disputes in 2006 increased by 25% compared with 2005.

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Adobe Joins Media Player War

4/13/2007
The beta version of the Flash-based video playback includes a variety of social features such as the ability to comment on, tag, rate, and share videos with friends.

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Google Desktop Goes Mac

4/4/2007
The software is based on the Windows version of search software, but Google says it spent considerable time rewriting the code for the Macintosh.

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Steve Jobs And EMI End DRM And Start Price Gouging

4/2/2007
The deal announced today between Apple and EMI to sell unprotected digital songs on iTunes for $1.29 isn't a deal. It's a 30% piracy tax, substantially more than the 3% tax levied on blank digital audio recording media in the United States. Never mind that Jobs is right and DRM should go. Charging a third more under the pretense of higher fidelity and greater freedom is just a rip-off.

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