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 Seth Grimes
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Profile of Seth Grimes

News & Commentary Posts: 213
Seth Grimes is an analytics strategy consultant with Alta Plana and organizes the Sentiment Analysis Symposium. Follow him on Twitter at @sethgrimes
Articles by Seth Grimes

The Content Problems Waiting To Be Solved

11/10/2010
There's nothing like time constraints to focus a message, in the instance I'm reporting today, ten minutes for Lubor Ptacek, VP for Product Marketing at enterprise content management vendor Open Text, to give a run-down of The [Content] Problems Waiting To Be Solved. Here's my report...

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Smart Content, Online on a Social Platform Near You

11/3/2010
You'd think the rise of the Social Net would mean the demise of "you had to be there," yet face-to-face still means stronger community and engagement. Being there still matters, but I can offer a next-best-thing, a social-enabled report on Smart Content, a recent content-analytics conference that I organized.

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Social Market Lessons in J.D. Power's Analytics Deals

10/22/2010
Marketing-information provider J.D. Power this week announced agreements with social-media technology companies Clarabridge and NetBase, yet the company had acquired social-analytics start-up Umbria just 30 months ago for pretty much the same need. This week's announcement illustrates new directions for the larger social/voice-of-the-customer analytics market.

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Sociable BI: Could 'Tableau' Become a Verb?

9/27/2010
Tableau visual data-analysis software embodies sociable BI, business intelligence that prizes accessibility, ease-of-use, and power, with a strong measure of collaboration and sharing, per Tableau Software's "Business Analytics For All" tag line. Does that mean that "Soon we'll say that we 'tableau' data the way we now say we 'google' for information"?

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Six Definitions of Smart Content

9/24/2010
Smart Content is information, typically originating in "unstructured" formats, that is findable, reusable, more profitable for the producer, and more useful for the consumer. While technology facilitates smart content, it is business value -- not analytics, semantics, or XML storage -- that is central to industry experts' definitions, and to mine...

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Google Data, Statistics, and the Semanticized Web

9/20/2010
I imagine that Google employs many hundreds of data scientists, folks whose job is to study and turn to good use the huge masses of data the search-advertising-application services giant, and its users, generate. Each document indexed, each search, each ad served, each service call creates data. This data is used to create a better Google: easier to use, faster, more accurate, effective, and functional, and yes, more profitable. Google Instant, out a couple of weeks ago, is a latest initiative

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Semantics and Analytics Unlock Value in Social and Online Content

9/8/2010
Facebook, LinkedIn, Trip Advisor, and Twitter -- social media -- are almost incidental, replaceable tomorrow if another platform proves more attractive, powerful, and agile. It's content that is king, especially "smart content" that allows producers and consumers alike to find the greatest value in online and enterprise content.

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PowerPoint and Failure to Communicate

8/30/2010
As a tool for communicating data-derived insights, PowerPoint comes up repeatedly, praised or under fire, reflecting the office software's ubiquity, adaptability, and unfortunate ease of misuse.

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Mobile BI, Situational Intelligence, and a Call-Out to SAP-Sybase

8/25/2010
Mobile computing is a disruptor, a game-changer. Forward looking organizations, notably recently merged SAP and Sybase, have seen mobile's enterprise potential, including as a BI revolutionizer. Our vision should extend to situational intelligence, situational awareness coupled with interpretation of the users status, plans, and goals and enhanced with analysis of the user's social network...

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The Socialization of BI

7/20/2010
As social computing matures, we see signs of a socialization of BI: Incorporation of social-media analysis into the BI toolkit, adaptation of social styles to BI processes, and development of BI tools that play nice on social platforms.

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My Feelings About Sentiment Analysis

6/29/2010
Growth in visibility, acceptance, and adoption of automated sentiment-analysis solutions has been fueled by vendor innovations and by positive customer experiences, reports Elizabeth Glagowski in 1to1 magazine. Liz interviewed me for her article, and with her permission, I will share the full text of our exchange with readers...

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Beyond SQL, Knowledge-Seeking Queries

6/23/2010
"Does anyone have a good example of a query that SQL can't do?" Fact is, 30+ years in, there are few queries that you can't implement with SQL. More-complex queries may rely on user-defined functions (UDFs), procedural extensions, or convoluted coding but may still fall short. So here's my beyond-SQL example -- "What are the 39 Steps?" -- by which I mean, knowledge-seeking queries.

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Sentiment Analysis Feels Its Way Forward

4/30/2010
A bit of controversy regarding sentiment analysis is playing out. A techno-skeptic blogger clique asserts that automated sentiment analysis is so inaccurate as to render automated methods worthless. Others differ with them: we like automation. Newly joining us are some of the skeptics' own kind, critics such as "Measurement Queen" K.D. Paine...

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Seven Questions for Teradata

4/28/2010
I'm about to attend day two of Teradata's annual third-party industry influencers meeting. I'm grateful for the opportunity to listen, to voice my opinions, and, per the agenda distributed by analyst-relations manager extraordinaire Kim Dossey, to "Ask Any Question." I'll actually aim for seven. Here they are...

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It's Very Early in the Game for SAS Social Media Analytics

4/19/2010
The flash and splash of last week's SAS Social Media Analytics (SMA) launch belies the apparent very early, incomplete state of the service. The dashboard interface is attractive, but the application is nonetheless narrowly focused and inflexible, an analytics silo with no out-of-the-box integration with enterprise systems.

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Can Sentiment Analysis Help Companies Tap New Markets?

4/8/2010
"Can sentiment analysis help companies tap new markets?" This question was posed to me by Joab Jackson, an astute IT industry watcher. My answer: Find new customers, yes. Find new segments of customers, not on its own and not without some creativity. Let's explore a few scenarios...

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Is It Time For NoETL?

3/24/2010
I've been bemused by NoSQL, the movement that propounds database-management diversity. Is it now similarly time for a NoETL movement, reflecting a new world of liberated, semantically enriched, analysis-ready, mashable data?

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Open Text Buying Nstein, TechCrunch Misreports

2/23/2010
Enterprise content management vendor Open Text's planned acquisition of ECM + text-mining provider Nstein is significant text-analytics/publishing/content-management news. It gained the attention of TechCrunch, which managed to misreport the story. Here's my analysis of the news with a look at TechCrunch's mis-telling...

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The GATE Way to Open Source Text Analytics

2/18/2010
Hamish Cunningham is benevolent dictator of the GATE team, "researching human language computation." Their work is realized in a highly capable, open-source, text-analysis platform, the General Architecture for Text Engineering. Hamish's replies to my questions regarding Text Analytics Opportunities and Challenges for 2010 hold many insights about text analytics and open source...

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Open Source Choices

2/16/2010
Open source was Best Supporting Actor in the 2010 Editors' Choice Awards. It plays an important part -- in some cases, a star turn -- for 4 of The Dozen top-category winners and for 11 of the 36 Ones to Watch. Noting that the awards reflect both current impact and our expectations, clearly open source has reached a new level of enterprise importance and promise.

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Visualize Balance, Visualize Change

2/3/2010
The best BI visualizations bring out essential information that might otherwise remain hidden in data. A Washington Post visualization of President Obama's proposed $3.8 trillion budget for fiscal year 2011 does just that. There's much to be learned from a New York Times example as well, in particular about visualizing change.

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Semantic Search Footnotes: Concepts, Ontologies & Real Time

1/31/2010
I want to respond to a few comments/suggestions I received about my recent Intelligent Enterprise story, Breakthrough Analysis: Two + Nine Types of Semantic Search. Jim Hendler suggested a semantic-search approach I'd missed, "real-time search with some sort of filtering." I'll tackle that and points raised by NLP/semantics researcher Tom O'Hara...

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Sentiment Analysis, Enterprise Content, and Social Media, Year 2010

1/26/2010
Sentiment analysis is one of the most challenging and one of the most interesting uses of text technologies. Application areas include customer satisfaction and support, marketing, financial markets, media and publishing, and politics and policy. That's why I've created a new conference, the Sentiment Analysis Symposium, slated for April 13 in New York...

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Distorted Netflix Rental Data, Online at NYTimes.com

1/11/2010
I'd like to like the New York Times's on-line visualization, "A Peek Into Netflix Queues." I'm a big fan of the paper and its infographics, but in the end, Netflix visualization strikes me as glitzy rather than informative, a misleading graphical tarting up of incomplete data. I will explain where Netflix and the Times went wrong...

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Eleven BI/Analytics Topics for 2010

12/30/2009
This time of year, we pundit types like to post our summations of the past year's developments, our Best Of lists recapping our own work, and our industry predictions for next year, for 2010. Not me, not this year. I will, however, post on the year ahead... for me, on BI and analytics topics that I plan to cover in the next few months...

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Google and the Meaning of Half Open

12/22/2009
Google is half open: the conclusion I draw after reading product management SVP Jonathan Rosenberg's "The Meaning of Open." For all the pride and confidence and even wisdom conveyed in the essay, Google's core, its strategic direction -- Rosenberg's own product management brief -- is rightly closed rather than community-driven.

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BI or Analytics? "'T ain't what you do..."

12/11/2009
There was yet another "What's the definition of analytics?" exchange on-line today prompted by a software vendor's claim to be "beyond BI" or the like... My response: "'T ain't what you do, it's the way that you do it." Let's talk value, not feature lists...

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The Myth of 360 Degree Views

11/30/2009
We've all encountered the promise of 360-degree customer views, marketing-speak that asserts that BI solution X, CRM solution Y, or Sales Force Automation solution Z considers customer information from all angles. Yet I've never seen the "360-degree" claim fulfilled. Here's my take on 360-degree views and how they can finally becoming reality...

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Text Data Quality: Mistakes and More

11/25/2009
I wrote recently on Text Data Quality, looking at issues that affect analytical accuracy, that "the basic text data quality issue is that humans make mistakes, and the challenge is that people's natural-language mistakes defy easy, automated detection." This topic and related non-erroneous vagaries of human language bear further exploration...

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True BI for the Masses

11/16/2009
BI for the Masses is overused marketing-speak meant to suggest that Vendor X's break-out Product Y is going to enable/deliver business intelligence beyond the 15%-20% of knowledge workers who currently do BI. Well, I have my own notion of BI for the Masses, and it is NOT what it's typically claimed to be. What it is is illustrated by a couple of recent New York Times data visualizations...

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Commercial and Community Open Source and Pentaho BI

10/22/2009
Last week, I offered the opinion that BI software publisher Pentaho has moved beyond a commercial open source business model. While what counts most is great, affordable software, an understanding of market trends helps everyone concerned make strategic choices. In this spirit, I'll present perspectives that complement mine, from Pentaho and from the Pentaho community...

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Open Source Decision Time for Pentaho BI

10/12/2009
For BI software publisher Pentaho, the demise of as-a-service BI provider LucidEra created an opportunity that was too good to pass up. LucidEra's Clearview interface, acquired and rebranded Pentaho Analyzer, fills a product-line gap. But is Pentaho, founded as a "commercial open source" BI vendor, still defined by open source? Pentaho itself seems unsure.

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Visual BI Meets Pop Culture

10/6/2009
BI has crossed a cultural threshold. Data visualization forms have become a tool of pop culture. Witness a pseudo-infographic published in the New York Times. The BI forms are there, absent the usual, numerical BI content. "He Came, He Heard, He Shared" subverts familiar chart forms to deliver social/media commentary. It's postmodern BI...

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Recovery.gov Double Fault: Broken Data Feeds

10/2/2009
The relaunched recovery.gov site no longer supports automated data feeds. These feeds had allowed users of the 1.0 site to perform valued-added analyses, "the whole point of accountability and transparency" according one site user, who added, "from a software architecture standpoint, they seem to have missed a key principle here: backward compatibility."

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Relaunched Recovery.gov Fails Accessibility Standards

9/30/2009
Recovery.gov, a showcase government-transparency Web site that relaunched on Monday, fails to meet U.S. federal government Section 508 accessibility standards. The non-compliance issues relate to display of data tables despite on-site compliance claims. Sharron Rush of accessibility-advocacy organization Knowbility goes so far as to state, "The recovery.gov Web site is a good example of what NOT to do for accessibility in my opinion."

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Twitter Stirs Up the Analyst Industry

9/23/2009
Every Twitter user gets the same on-site visibility and capabilities. As a result, celebrities excluded, authority chez Twitter derives from your network and from your tweets and only after that from your biography and employment. Since open publishing is an independent-analyst ethos, we independents have taken to wide-open Twitter like, well, whales to the air...

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Questions and Answers about USAspending.gov

9/8/2009
My blog article on USAspending.gov's design flaws has attracted record page views, boosted by coverage on Slashdot, Government Computer News, and other outlets. Posted comments reveal many misconceptions about the site. I'll distill the more interesting ones, with some of my own, into a series of questions. Noting that "government should be collaborative," I'll attempt answers myself...

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CEP + BI = Real-Time Event Analytics

9/4/2009
Event-driven analytics aims to facilitate business decisions and actions as opportunities (and threats) emerge. Move the concept into the Now, into the worlds of on-line commerce and real-time fraud detection, and old, DBMS-reliant architectures just aren't fast enough. Complex event processing (CEP) added to BI promises to close the speed gap, to enable real-time event analytics...

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Serious Design Failure at USAspending.gov

9/1/2009
The U.S. federal government's USAspending.gov Web site is a travesty, almost a parody of a government-transparency site. The site looks fine, but it significantly fails accessibility requirements. Its use of graphics has only gotten worse -- far worse -- since I wrote about execution issues a month ago. Further, it's old-school, a mockery of Gov 2.0 principles of interactivity and responsiveness and community.

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Whacky Graphics at USAspending.gov

7/31/2009
I started this blog entry with the intent of appraising USAspending.gov's IT Dashboard, a new, interactive tool for evaluation of Federal Government IT spending. Unfortunately, graphical issues start on USAspending.gov's main page with one downright whacky graphic. I can't recall the last time I saw a graphic that so distorted the numbers, so I tried to recreate it (and failed). Here's how...

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In SPSS, IBM Gains an Open R & Python Analytics Platform

7/30/2009
I love telling folks that I ran my first SPSS programs in 1976... and that I haven't run one since. SPSS has long since reinvented itself as a predictive analytics vendor but brings other, less-visible assets to the IBM deal including the ability to patch Python and R code into SPSS routines. SPSS's Bring Your Own Analytics is a clear competitive differentiator with benefits for users and the company alike...

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Predictive Text Analytics and SPSS's Predictive Enterprise Vision

7/17/2009
Damn trademarks. I'm slated to speak on predictive text analytics at October's Predictive Analytics World conference. SPSS's Olivier Jouve commented, "Seth, glad to see you using 'Predictive Text Analytics' - expression that SPSS and I crafted in 2003!" While SPSS hasn't trademarked "predictive analytics," I'm impressed with the company's broader vision to similarly own that field...

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CEP, Events, and Continuous {Transformation | Intelligence}

7/1/2009
Given that BI thought leaders are wrestling with the notion of events, perhaps we will see a BI-mainstreaming of event processing in the not-too-distant future. Interest in streams and events has definitely picked up in the last few months, and next year could very well be the break-out year for BI on data and event streams.

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When Business Gets Too Personal

6/26/2009
Visualization guru Stephen Few reminds us that analyst opinions, while offered by recognized experts, are inherently personal, and that on the other side of the table, there are real people behind products, marketing campaigns, and corporate decisions. But I disagree with Steve that analysts should always name names. Some situations become simply too personal...

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Summer Reading: IR, Sentiment Analysis, and Visualization

6/25/2009
Summer's slower pace allows time to work through material set aside for calmer days. My reading list includes works on Information Retrieval, Sentiment Analysis, and Visualization. The items on my list are technical and accessible, of potential interest to anyone who works with analytics. You might also find them worth at least a quick look.

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Reports from the 2009 Text Analytics Summit

6/10/2009
The number and quality of end-user presentations at year's Text Analytics Summit prove that Marti Hearst's 1999 observation, "The nascent field of text data mining (TDM) has the peculiar distinction of having a name and a fair amount of hype but as yet almost no practitioners," is definitively no longer operative...

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Limits of Visualization: Wordle Misses Meaning

5/21/2009
As I related in connection to my image gallery, "See Connections with Visualization," "Building on the foundation of basic charting, data graphics and dashboard displays, the growing palate of visualization makes analyses more accessible and understandable to a general business audience." Yet visualizations can be no better than the information and analyses that feed them. Let's use Wordle, an excellent "toy," to see why.

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Text Analytics Survey and Summit

5/4/2009
Serious IT-market research should look at the demand side, at customer and prospect perspectives. I try to maintain balance myself in studying the text-analytics market, software and services designed to help enterprises find business value in "unstructured" text. You can help. Please participate in a survey I'm running and consider attending the up-coming Text Analytics Summit...

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IBM Weighs In: Information Wants To Be Expensive

4/19/2009
I was quite disappointed to discover that IBM has cut off free access to historical IBM Journal articles. Decades of valuable, industry focused computing literature is now behind a "paywall," material that establishes the foundations of BI, data warehousing, text analytics, and more. For what? IBM earned $12.3 billion on sales of $103.6 billion in 2008. Let's look at what we in the data business have lost...

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The ACM Looks at Sentiment Analysis

4/2/2009
"Our Sentiments, Exactly" in the April issue of the Communications of the ACM tackles sentiment analysis. The subhead: "With sentiment analysis algorithms, companies can identify and assess the wide variety of opinions found online and create computational models of human opinion." Author Alex Wright interviewed me for the article, and with his permission, I'll share our conversation...

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A Last Look at Open Source BI

3/31/2009
Open-source BI and I have come to a parting of ways. OS-BI capabilities, reliability, and support have matured. Commercial OS-BI vendors now compete with BI market leaders. That competition now appears to focus primarily on solutions and on the cost and community advantages open-source-reliant business models can (and do) offer. I will, however, take one last look, a snapshot of the state of the market, before I take my leave of the topic...

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SAS Gets with the (Open Source) Program

3/5/2009
A January New York Times article on the R open-source statistical programming environment catalysed a change in attitude at SAS. In just one month, SAS's position swerved from disdain to embrace with an admission that "both R and SAS are here to stay, and finding ways to make them work better with each other is in the best interests of our customers." And that's good news, for SAS and for R.

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Prediction Market Forecasts Are Not A Sure Thing

3/1/2009
The February 26 Economist looks at the state of prediction markets, a tool for turning collective human insights into forecasts. The title and subhead capture the reporter's take: "An Uncertain Future," "A novel way of generating forecasts has yet to take off." The short Economist article cites experiences at three user organizations. Those experiences are telling...

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Infonic Reloaded, or the Liberation of Lexalytics

2/24/2009
I have been following the recent implosion and regeneration of text-analytics, document-management, and Sharepoint services provider Infonic. The imbroglio affects subsidiary Lexalytics, which doesn't deserve the taint of guilt by association. I've concluded that the story bears exploring and that Lexalytics, given what I know of its products and management, should come out fine...

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Slicing Up The BI Market

2/18/2009
Analyst Lyndsay Wise recently published a useful BI demand-side analysis. Her thesis is that "small and mid-sized organizations seem to get the short end of the stick when it comes to their software needs" based on IT infrastructure she sees as needed to support BI and related technology. Yet I wonder if segmenting BI-user enterprises by gross revenue is the best way to look at the BI demand-side market. Let's consider other, more refined approaches.

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Semantic Web Snake Oil

2/4/2009
The Gospel of Matthew says, "by their fruits ye shall know them." Judging by their work, some of the biggest Semantic Web proponents are snake-oil salesmen. What else are we to conclude when figures who fervently boost the Semantic Web can't be bothered – or are unable – to publish their own Web materials with semantic mark-up? That's why, when it comes to semantics, my bet is on analytics...

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Vendor Stability Matters Too

1/29/2009
Technology is important, and so is vendor stability. You want solutions that perform, and you need to be confident that providers will be there for support and upgrades. I've seen evidence that two software vendors I follow are facing business complications. Here are their stories, a cautionary tale, names withheld as an ethical compromise...

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The Real Data Liberation Initiative

1/15/2009
The Data Liberation Initiative is a worthy project that aims to provide academic researchers with affordable and equitable access to Canadian current governmental statistics and other data. It benefits the spectrum of public data users. DLI and similar undertakings such as the US government's Fedstats, the Open Data Foundation, and IBM's Many Eyes are what real data liberation is all about...

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Complex Event Processing as a Marketing Device

1/5/2009
"For software vendors, CEP is a marketing device and nothing else. Notice that no two people will agree on what complex-event processing is, but everyone claims to be more CEP than the next guy. The only two consistent attributes across all 'CEP' products are (1) they are in some way used for soft real-time processing and (2) they are general purpose, rather than coming pre-customized for a very specific purpose..."

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Quality Issues (Still) Plague Spoke.com People Search

12/31/2008
"If you want to keep your job, use Spoke," advise the folks behind "the fastest growing and most up-to-date business network in the U.S." Sounds like something to look into; social/people networks are one of the most important BI assets to have emerged in recent years. Grading according to accuracy, completeness, quality, usefulness, and usability, I'd give Spoke a low C. Here's why.

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Spock.com Taps Text Analytics

12/16/2008
Spock is a people-search engine, currently in beta release. The company uses "a combination of search-engine technologies and user edits to aggregate the world's people information and make it searchable." Andrew Borthwick, Principal Scientist at Spock Networks, kindly fielded a number of questions about Spock's use of text analytics and Spock's data-quality efforts.

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BI on Content Feeds, a.k.a. Continuous (Twitter) Transformation

12/8/2008
The rapid pace and high volume of twitter messaging has upped the stakes for BI on content feeds. BI on content feeds: that would be stuff like monitoring and mining sentiment from social media for reputation and brand management, which you can do with text analytics on RSS and Atom feeds and Web pages. One approach to making sense of the flow is the CEPish application of continuous transformations that the folks behind SQLstream recently showed me.

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"Many Known and Unknown Fatal Bugs" in MySQL 5.1!?

12/4/2008
What to make of Michael Widenus's astounding blog posting, "Oops, we did it again (MySQL 5.1 released as GA with crashing bugs)"? The signs have been there: MySQL has worked for over three years (!) to bring out 5.1. EWeek quoted Zack Urlocker, VP of products for Sun's Database Group, last May as claiming, "This version now has zero bugs," a statement disputed even then by Widenus, who effectively characterized MySQL bug management as a shell game, and GA did take 7 more months.

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Up Next: BI on Social Networks

11/30/2008
It's time for the BI community to treat social networks as the business-intelligence resource they are. The recent "Motrin moms" clamor and response to Mumbai terrorism prove networks' value. The value of the information that flows through these networks is indisputable. A deeper challenge is next on the agenda: optimizing that flow by better understanding the networks themselves.

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Open Source BI: Eclipse BIRT and Talend

11/17/2008
Information Week has published my article on open source business intelligence (OSBI), Open Source BI Still Fighting For Its Share, a title that applies both to the BI software market and to IW column inches. I'll share with readers material I wrote, cut by IW's editors, on open-source data-integration vendor Talend and on Eclipse BIRT, Business Intelligence and Reporting Tools.

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Clarabridge Focuses on Customer Experience

11/14/2008
I spent a worthwhile day last week at Clarabridge's inaugural user conference. The company is a leading text analytics vendor, and the opportunity to catch up with staff and users and (it turned out) prospects and partners was too good to pass up. Clarabridge is different from many other text analytics vendors in its singular focus on customer-experience management (CEM). The approach seems to work.

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SAS Offers 101 on Voice Mining

10/29/2008
Manya Mayes of SAS has written a helpful introductory paper on audio analytics, "Tune into the Voice of Your Customer with Voice Mining." The technology and techniques described have applications for e-discovery, intelligence, and rich-media search. Given coverage of distinctive characteristics of speech and of analytical concerns that include BI integration, Manya's paper merits a look for anyone who works with audio data.

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Heatmap Visualizations: the NY Times and NASDAQ

10/22/2008
The New York Times has published another excellent visualization, this one a heatmap, Can a President Tame the Business Cycle? The on-line, interactive version adds highly useful capabilities that obviously can't be delivered in a static, printed newspaper. Let's explore, via comparison with a financial-information visualization published by the NASDAQ stock market, how underwhelming a mediocre heatmap can be.

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Lexalytics' ExecDex, or the PR Folks Know Best

10/10/2008
A press release from Lexalytics touts ExecDex, a Web site that features a "business-leader ranking index." Now Lexalytics makes an interesting sentiment-analysis engine, but I thought ExecDex should have been more fully developed before release to the likes of me. It seems Lexalytics CEO Jeff Catlin agreed, but the two of us couldn't have been more wrong. I think we both received a lesson in looking at tech applications through others' eyes.

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The Semantic Web: Perhaps Not So "On the Cusp"

10/8/2008
The Semantic Web was conceptualized almost a decade ago, but despite progress on protocols and publishing tools, it remains far from realization. Yes, semantics are important in boosting information findability and usefulness, but these SW examples — I cited another in a year-ago blog article — only emphasize the gap between SW boosterism and Web reality.

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Nominate Now for the 2008 Jolt Awards

10/1/2008
Do you work for a company or project that makes software tools? Check out the 19th annual Jolt Awards for software-development product excellence. We're on the look-out for "Joltworthy" products that provide an SDK, components, languages or APIs, and/or back-end capabilities for developers. There are 13 categories total. They accommodate a spectrum of software and software-related products.

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Is Business Activity Monitoring a BI Application?

9/29/2008
A question I posed to a LinkedIn group — Is Business Activity Monitoring (BAM) a BI Application? — sparked interesting discussion. There have been 9 responses to date, including two from Howard Dresner, who has done as much as anyone to shape current-day BI. The responses speak to growing interest in operational BI, and they hint at the impact that complex event processing (CEP) will have on enterprise analytics.

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Lyzasoft's Non-Analytical Approach to Analytics

9/22/2008
Lyzasoft, Inc. calls its Lyza software a "powerful desktop analytics solution." According to the company, Lyza "enables analysts to synthesize, explore, and visualize data, then to publish compelling presentations and dashboards." Lyza seems worth considering as a personal data-integration tool, but it appears to fall short of greater claims.

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Event Processing Meets Text: Reuters at Gartner

9/18/2008
Richard Brown of Thomson Reuters delivered an illuminating talk, "News, Blogs, and Full-Tick Logs: Innovative Approaches to Quantitative and Event-Driven Trading," Tuesday at Gartner's Event Processing Summit. Brown's case study, which looked at exploiting information from unstructured sources to support financial-market trading, was of particular interest (to me) due to its combination of events, text sources, and sentiment analysis.

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