Author
 David  DeJean

Profile of David DeJean

News & Commentary Posts: 300
Articles by David DeJean

News Of What's New

1/19/2008
Between the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas and the flood of press releases timed to the show, there is news about several of the subjects and companies I've written about over the past year. Some updates are in order. Eye-Fi continutes to be a big winner, HSUPA comes to laptops, and more.

Post a Comment

Where WAS Microsoft -- And Vista -- At CES?

1/15/2008
Watching Steve Jobs do it again at Macworld Tuesday, whipping up tech enthusiasm (even though the MacBook Air doesn't give him as much to work with as the iPhone did a year ago), I was struck by the comparison with Microsoft at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas last week. Bill Gates booked in on his Final Farewell Tour, but even with that, the giant software company seemed to barely bother to show up.

Post a Comment

Displays Were A Bright Spot At CES

1/11/2008
The Consumer Electronics Show felt a little short on big technology news this year, but one bright spot (pun intended) was displays. And the most interesting news of all was Texas Instruments' demonstration of DualView on displays that use its DLP projection technology. DualView puts two different full-screen video signals displayed on the same screen at the same time.

Post a Comment

Transport Dreams For Foot-Weary CES Walkers

1/10/2008
The Consumer Electronics Show is not a journey for the faint-hearted. You can walk miles on the show floors. So it's no surprise that after a couple of days of footsore product-spotting, the products that began to look most interesting were transportation-related -- like the motorized snowshoes and the 13-mph beer cooler.

Post a Comment

World's Smallest PC? Part 2

1/9/2008
Chinese company Tsinghua Tongfang, maker of the LimePC line, is showing a brand-new tiny computer at the Consumer Electronics Show -- not as small as the MTube project's design, but a whole lot closer to being a real product -- and a really interesting one, at that.

Post a Comment

Coming: More Ways To Turn Vinyl LPs Into Digital Files

1/9/2008
ION Audio scored big last year with digital turntable equipment that connected to your PC to rip vinyl LPs to MP3 files. This year at CES in Las Vegas, the company has pushed the product line even further, announcing three new models. One will rip an LP directly to your iPod, another records to an SD card or flash drive, and a third includes an optical drive to automatically burn a CD.

Post a Comment

New Features, And Controversy, Coming To MP3tunes.com

1/9/2008
If you have a music locker on MP3tunes.com, you'll probably be glad to hear that the Web-based music storage service is adding some new features. If you are a recording company, you'll probably be upset. And if you're Michael Robertson, MP3tunes CEO, you'll regard it as one more small battle in an effort to build a business on helping music buyers control what they bought.

Post a Comment

World's Smallest PC?

1/8/2008
It's not exactly a product. You can't buy it. You can barely even see it. But a team from National Taiwan University is at CES showing off an ultra-small PC and looking for commercialization partners.

Post a Comment

Small Clues To The Future

1/8/2008
The Consumer Electronics Show is very good at big. It has halls of tradeshow booths as big as football fields, exhibitors showing off monster trucks with megawatt sound systems. But if you want to know what the future looks like, you can often learn more from the little things -- like the International Commerce Center, where small Taiwanese and Chinese manufacturers show their wares in a couple of hotel ballrooms as crowded and busy as a Hong Kong back street.

Post a Comment

New Products From . . . Amiga?

1/7/2008
LAS VEGAS -- At CES, scouting for new products, 0ne of the names you definitely don't expect to hear is Amiga. Surely that's ancient history, a footnote in the family tree of the PC. Yeah but don't say that around Bill McEwen. He's president of Amiga and he's announcing a new write-once-run-anywhere development platform, AmigaAnywhere 2. And even better -- or more bizarre - he says he's got new Amiga hardware coming, too.

Post a Comment

A Technology Story: A Terabyte Optical Drive

1/7/2008
LAS VEGAS -- CES sometimes seems like it's all products all the time, but one of the interesting things about coming back year after year is that a strange sort of time-lapse perspective kicks in -- you can watch a new technology grow from concept to prototype to finished product to industry segment. I think I caught one of those at a very early stage this weekend. I met the people behind Mempile, a technology development effort aimed at creat

Post a Comment

What's Your Digital Home Strategy?

1/6/2008
LAS VEGAS -- It was just Saturday in Las Vegas. The Consumer Electronics Show hadn't even started officially yet, but already it was clear that "digital home strategy for 2008" was going to be a phrase I'm going to get really tired of by next Thursday. There will be miles of exhibit aisles, thousands of newer-than-new products, and unlimited digital home strategies. I'm going to get one, too, just in self-defense.

Post a Comment

iPhone Beats Windows Mobile In Browsing Use

12/16/2007
Market statistician Net Applications says on its Web site that Apple iPhones currently account for .09% of Web browsing, while all Windows Mobile devices put together account for only .06%. That's pretty astonishing, given the relative numbers of handheld devices running each OS in the marketplace.

Post a Comment

Real Zune Now

11/27/2007
New models of Microsoft's Zune media player prove that Microsoft is still Microsoft: It's one of the best companies in the world at doing the difficult job of learning from its mistakes.

Post a Comment

Bigger Screens, Lighter Notebooks? It's Not A Paradox

11/20/2007
Fujitsu is releasing a new laptop today that breaks one of the rules of notebook physics -- it has a bigger screen than a similar predecessor model, but it's lighter. How does that work? The reason is the change in screen technology from fluorescent-backlit to LED-backlit.

Post a Comment

Pssst, Wanna 57 Percent Return? OLPC

11/17/2007
If you're interested in a sure thing in a computer technology investment I've got a hot tip for you -- a guaranteed 57% return. Not only that, you get a cool laptop and a tax break just like you were buddies with George Bush (if that idea appeals to you). Your cost? $423.95 and a postage stamp. Here's how it works. (I'll explain the stamp later.)

Post a Comment

Windows Home Server Gets Serious

11/5/2007
Back in May at Microsoft's Windows Hardware Engineering (WinHEC) Conference, Windows Home Server, a new product, still in beta, was one of the stars of the show. It's taken nearly six months for Home Server to get its act together and take it on the road. But today HP finally announces its MediaSmart Server, a Home Server appliance, and Home Server will soon appear at big-box retailers near you.

Post a Comment

One Laptop Per (Inner) Child

11/1/2007
The Asus Eee goes on sale in the United States this morning. Finally. The Eee is the less-than-two-pound, Linux-based, instant-on, 7-inch-screen, no-hard-disk, $400 laptop that was announced last June. It's been slowly making its way to the States ever since, and I've been tracking its progress by reading reviews from overseas. Now, at last, it's here.

Post a Comment

Broadband Providers Nix Sticks

10/29/2007
Testimony before a House subcommittee last week reiterated what we already knew: fewer people in the United States have broadband Internet access than in several other countries, and rural areas of the United States have even less access to broadband than urban areas. They're called "the sticks" for a reason: rural America gets this one stuck to it, too, as it does on a lot of other social, economic, and technical issues.

Post a Comment

Vista Problem? Fill Out This Form

10/17/2007
So let's say you're running Windows Vista and you copy some files. You get an error message: ""Out of memory There is not enough memory to complete this operation." So this is exactly why Microsoft created Windows Update and a fix is coming, right? Well, no. There's a hotfix, but you have to ask for it. What's wrong with this picture?

Post a Comment

Do You Use Vista Or Does It Use You, Continued

10/15/2007
Open the pod bay door, HAL. There are stories from a couple of sources about Windows Update automatically updating and rebooting users' systems even when they thought they'd disabled automatic updates. And Microsoft hasn't said anything much about why.

Post a Comment

The OTHER Apple Phone

10/5/2007
The bloom may be off the iPhone for you, like it is for me -- it was pricey, then it was suspiciously cheaper, it was locked, it was unlocked, it was bricked, whatever. But along comes a guy with ANOTHER Apple phone that's just plain coolness -- he's making calls on his Newton. His what?

Post a Comment

An Upgraded Opera For Mobile Browsing

10/3/2007
The Opera Mobile browser is preferred by many to Internet Explorer Mobile for Web browsing on Windows Mobile-based equipment. So it's good news for lots of people that there's an incremental upgrade just out, Opera Mobile 8.65. And Version 9 is on the way. And if you're a BlackBerry user, Opera wants you as well.

Post a Comment

Palm Foleo, We Hardly Knew Ye!

9/7/2007
When Palm canceled the Foleo this week, I got a condolence note from a reader of an article I'd written the week before that had said nice things about the Foleo. "Too bad . . . Guess you'll have to update your recent article," he wrote. Well, much as I might like a do-over, life doesn't always work that way. I am sorry to see Palm kill the Foleo, even though I think I know why.

Post a Comment

Spam Blacklists Still In Tunnel, But Is That Light Up Ahead?

9/5/2007
A couple of recent court decisions are good news - no, great news - if you hate spam. Two compilers of anti-spam blacklists, Kaspersky Lab and Spamhaus, both had decisions go their way. But unfortunately, the Kaspersky decision, clearcut though it is, may not be enough to save Spamhaus.

Post a Comment

Blocking The Ad Blockers: Formula For Success?

8/28/2007
A Web site owner is protesting a Firefox plug-in, Adblock Plus, that blocks advertisements. He's doing it by blocking all Firefox users from his site, whether they're running Firefox or not. It's a gutsy move. As Microsoft with its Windows Genuine Advantage screw-up this weekend reminds us, nothing builds relationships with your customers quite like giving the impression you're calling them al

Post a Comment

Microsoft Endorses A Fix For Something It Insists Isn't A Problem

8/25/2007
Vista's User Account Controls prompts are something almost everybody loves to hate. Microsoft has steadfastly maintained that they're a feature that improves the product. But this week, "Microsoft has taken the very unusual step of endorsing another company's product that fixes a problem in its own operating system." The "Through the Looking Glass" saga of Vista continues.

Post a Comment

Is Open-Source A Business Model? $500 Million Says It Is

8/16/2007
There has long been a school of thought that says there's no business model for open source -- in fact, that open source is the opposite of a business model. Citrix's acquisition of XenSource, a business that rests on open-source software, is one more piece of evidence to the contrary.

Post a Comment

The Line Between Laptops And PDAs Gets Fuzzier

8/14/2007
Fujitsu is announcing two new devices today -- an ultramobile PC with a 5.6-inch display, and an ultralight tablet/laptop PC with a 12.1-inch WXGA screen. They are nifty devices that underscore the movement in not just one market, but two, because they come just days after IDC reported that the PDA market has dropped 42% since last year.

Post a Comment

A Nagging Problem Gets a Nagging Solution

8/10/2007
A couple of months ago I asked a question in this blog about a problem I was having with file transfers to Vista - it was giving me an error message that said only, "You must have permission to perform this action." Nobody came up with the answer. Maybe nobody is having the same problem? I hope not, because it turned out to be pilot error. Dummy me. Here's what was happening.

Post a Comment

'Buy It Now' Lives On - For Now

7/30/2007
A Federal District Court judge in Virginia on Friday ruled against patent troll MercExchange's request for an injunction that would prohibit eBay from using its "Buy It Now" feature. It's a victory in the ongoing struggle to fix the badly broken patent system, but it doesn't address the real issue: MercExchange should never have gotten a patent for something as simplemindedly obvious as "Buy It Now" in the first place.

Post a Comment

Microsoft Gets No Kick From Vista

7/23/2007
Fifty-one billion dollars is a number so big it's hard to get your mind around -- a number-of-galaxies-in-the-sky number, a Halliburton-no-bid-contract number. Still, I'm willing to believe Microsoft took in that much in its just-ended fiscal year. But Microsoft says that huge number was in some way helped by "solid customer acceptance" of Vista? Come on, I wasn't born yesterday.

Post a Comment

No Skype on iPhone? Not So!

7/11/2007
This just in to our All-iPhone-All-The-Time Desk: If you were bummed because you couldn't run Skype on your iPhone, weep no more. There's a work-around-around. You can install and run SoonR Talk, an AJAX app that works on the Opera Mobile browser version 8.6 (which you presumably also have to install and run) on your iPhone. At least that's Tom Keating's story in his VoIP & Gadgets Blog entry on TMCne

Post a Comment

Net Neutrality Deserves Some Fairness, Too

7/9/2007
A new paper by authors associated with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the University of Nevada Reno concludes that net neutrality is a bad idea. This isn't surprising - not because it makes sense, but because it was largely underwritten by AT&T, which hopes to make billions of dollars from throttling the free flow of traffic on the Internet.

Post a Comment

We Still Need Net Neutrality Legislation

7/4/2007
We haven't heard much about net neutrality legislation lately. That could be because the current Congress might actually be able to pass it, and opponents like AT&T and Verizon are laying low, spreading lobbying money, and trying to wait out that shocking possibility. That makes the Federal Trade Commission's anti-net neutrality announcement last week even more puzzling. Was it intended as a warning from the Bush administration to Congress to back off, or was it yet another shake of the money tr

Post a Comment

Lawrence Lessig Takes On An Even Bigger Problem

6/26/2007
Stanford law professor Lawrence Lessig has for a decade worked in the area of that great oxymoron, "intellectual property," but last week he announced that he will no longer focus on IP issues. He isn't leaving "the movement," he wrote in his blog, ". . . but I have come to believe that until a more fundamental problem is fixed, 'the movement' can't succeed either." The problem? The corruption of the political

Post a Comment

We're All In The Same Bloat

6/15/2007
Bloatware -- sometimes called craplets -- is that ugly build-up of annoying code you find on new PCs -- demoware, trial applications and sign-ups, and marketing cruft that you have to deal with when you're setting up a new computer. Apple ridiculed PC bloatware in one of its spot-on "I'm-a-Mac-and-I'm-a-PC" ads. And in their latest newsletter, the guys at PC Pitstop say it's getting worse.

Post a Comment

Don't Shut Off Vista UAC, There's A Better Way

6/11/2007
One of the most annoying things about Microsoft Windows Vista is User Account Control and all the warnings it pops up to ask if you just did something you really wanted to do. Like, either (a) it wasn't you who pressed the Enter key, but the ghost of your grandfather standing at your shoulder, or (b) you really are too stupid to be trusted to know you want to install a program or open an attachment. The temptation is strong to turn off UAC warnings by disabling the controls, but that causes more

Post a Comment

The More UMPCs Shrink, The More They Stay The Same

6/5/2007
Ultra-mobile PCs are a category in search of a definition. Microsoft tried to nail it down last year with "Origami," a spec for a keyboardless device, that was pretty much laughed out of the park. But that didn't kill interest in small devices. And as today's introduction of a new "reference design" for a UMPC by VIA, the chipset and CPU maker, shows, while the devices are staying small, their usefulness is getting bigger.

Post a Comment

DRM: A Half-Step Forward, More Steps Back

6/4/2007
Apple came through on schedule last week and began selling DRM-free music files from EMI. It turns out this isn't a giant leap forward, more like a timid half-step, because they aren't really the clean files you probably hoped for. And far from leading in a seismic shift to respect for users by the music industry, it was a half-step forward that has been mostly obliterated by a massive rush backwards by t

Post a Comment

Everything Slow Is Fast Again

6/2/2007
The arguments are as long-lived as they are useless. Could the 1958 Yankees beat the 1918 White Sox? Would Spiderman beat Batman? Who's the better heavyweight, Muhammad Ali or Jack Johnson? Which computer is faster, a 1986 Macintosh Plus running System 6.0.8 on an 8MHz Motorola 68000 CPU, or a 2007 PC running Windows XP Pro SP2 on an AMD Athlon 64 X2 4800+ with two cores, each running at 2.4GHz? Oh, wait, here's a guy who has the answer to that one -- and it may surprise you.

Post a Comment

Doing the iPhone Shuffle

5/31/2007
We're headed into the home stretch on the iPhone frenzy. Apple is still saying "end of June" but Web sites like The Boy Genius Report are saying June 15, just about two weeks away. Alpha early adopters will be flaunting them in every martini bar and boardroom in America and the rest of us will be doing the iPhone Shuffle, waiting in line at the Cingular store. Already there are leaks and spe

Post a Comment

The Walrus Bucket Internet Meme, Seriously

5/29/2007
The Internet has become so important to society that its role in the transmission of memes may be the crucial fact of our age. Therefore it is absolutely vital to one's position in the social order to understand and be current with Internet memes. Don't you think? Which is why you should pay a great deal of very careful attention to the Walrus Bucket Saga. Because if you don't know about it, you'll be ou

Post a Comment

Driving Toward Solid-State Drives

5/25/2007
One of the more interesting conversations I had at Microsoft's Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) last week in Los Angeles was with two guys from Samsung. They talked about their company's push into solid-state memory as an enhancement -- and eventually a replacement -- for rotating hard disk storage on computers. Samsung isn't the only manufacturer working to develop plug-compatible flash memory-based storage. In January the five largest drive makers -- Samsung, Seagate, Fujitsu,

Post a Comment

What's Hot From WinHEC? Windows Home Server

5/17/2007
LOS ANGELES -- Microsoft's Windows Hardware Engineering Conference is winding down, and I'm trying to figure out what I've seen that's important. I mean really important. Not data, but real information. I'd say three things. One is the Rally technology I wrote about on Tuesday. Another is the speed that Post a Comment

OK, So I Was Wrong About Origami

5/16/2007
LOS ANGELES -- A year ago Microsoft tried to manipulate the launch of its Origami ultra-mobile PC (UMPC). The reaction wasn't quite what Microsoft anticipated: Origami was basically laughed back into the laboratory. Even I piled on with a blog entry that sniped, "Origami is proof of that old ada

Post a Comment

Windows Rally Technology at 1: Walking, And Ready To Run

5/15/2007
The Windows Hardware Engineering Conference, WinHEC 2007, going on this week in Los Angeles, marks the first birthday of Microsoft's Windows Rally technology. Rally is a package of software technologies built into Vista that make it supremely easy to set up a wireless network and add devices to it. That may thrill you, or it may not. I've struggled to get wireless networking going in enough situations that it thrilled me, I can tell you.

Post a Comment

Reading The WinHEC Tea Leaves

5/14/2007
Microsoft's Windows Hardware Engineering Conference, known to its friends as WinHEC, is this week in Los Angeles. It will be a week of Deep Geek -- and it won't be all Vista all the time, either. You can download the program as a very colorful Excel spreadsheet. The six session tracks and more than 100 hours of sessions reveal a lot about what's on Microsoft's mind wh

Post a Comment

'Mob Rule' In Digg Case? Not.

5/4/2007
In the wake of Digg's decision to allow entries to include the encryption key for AACS copy protection, several stories have appeared with headline's like "Mob Rule at Digg." I'm no great fan of Digg. It's obviously open to easy manipulation, and too much of what rises to the top is only slightly more important than who fathered Anna Nicole's baby. But the i

Post a Comment

Cellular Companies Want To Have Cake, Eat It Too

5/3/2007
The Internet Neutrality debate took an entertaining turn this week when several cellular carriers responded to a petition by VoIP provider Skype asking the Federal Communications Commission to extend its consumer broadband principles to the wireless industry. What we got was a sideshow performance by Verizon Wireless, AT&T and a sock puppet "industry association," the Post a Comment

Digg Does The Right Thing

5/2/2007
Digg found itself in the middle of a classic journalistic dilemma yesterday and it made a decision that gives me hope for the future of journalism on the Internet: it decided that its first obligation was to the free flow of information. It's especially interesting since Digg was responding to a censorship demand based on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), because it came

Post a Comment

Sometimes Steve Ballmer Just Takes Your Breath Away

4/30/2007
In a USA Today interview Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is asked if he wishes consumers would get as passionate about Microsoft as they do when Apple comes out with something new. "It's sort of a funny question," he answers. "Would I trade 96% of the market for 4% of the market? I want to have products that appeal to everybody." Steve, I've got one word for you: iPod.

Post a Comment

The Museum of Modern Betas? Del.icio.us!

4/26/2007
So this friend of mine wants to tell me about his new company, new product. But he's suave, he doesn't just email me, "Hey, Mr. Ur-So-Kool Press Bigshot, write me up." Instead he invites to me to connect to him on LinkedIn. Very subtle. He knows I'll backtrack his email address. I do. I find his company Web site. Product's still in the oven. Hmmm. But I also find it's listed on the
Post a Comment

FON Dials It Up With Software-Only Hotspot For Mac, Linux

4/25/2007
FON, the Spanish share-your-Internet-connection company, is moving fast this week. On Monday it announced a deal with Time Warner Cable that will officially let broadband customers do what some of them have already been doing unofficially -- set up FON routers that redistribute their Internet service via Wi-Fi. Today, FON announced software for Intel Macs and Linux boxes that does the same thing, no router required.

Post a Comment

A 'Most Likely to Succeed' List from the Web 2.0 Hypefest

4/20/2007
Tim O'Reilly, who gets credit for coining "Web 2.0," has taken several whacks at defining it, and he took another one this week at his own Web 2.0 Expo this week in San Francisco: "We are talking about persistent computing in which we are becoming part of a great machine." Thanks, but if that's it, I'll pass. If you, gentle reader, on the other hand, want to plug into whatever Web 2.0 means, a ratings company called Hitwise used th

Post a Comment

Copyright Royalty Board Puts Internet Radio On Death Watch

4/17/2007
The Copyright Royalty Board has quickly and completely affirmed its own decision on performance royalties, set in accordance with recording-industry wishes, that will be assessed against Internet music-streaming and radio station sites. Because the rates, which were more than a year overdue, were much higher than the Internet radio industry expected, and retroactive for 2006, one possible result is that many small Internet radio operators will cease operations immediately and wait to see if Cong

Post a Comment

What Evil Lurks In Your Backed-Up Files? Shadow Copy Knows

4/11/2007
Dave Methvin at PC Pitstop has an interesting -- and disturbing -- article in his company's monthly newsletter for April: Vista's slice-and-dice approach to carving its features into multiple versions has produced one presumably unintended side effect, he says: the less expensive Home Basic and Home Premium versions make backups of older versions of your files as you create new ones -- but you can neither access them, nor delete them.

Post a Comment

Guess What, Steve -- I Don't Love It (Remix)

4/4/2007
Over the years I have received my share of e-mail calling me an idiot, but I never got more than I've gotten for yesterday's blog entry titled "Guess What, Steve, I Don't Love It." And guess what? In this case I deserve it. I try, as a personal goal, to reply to all the e-mail I get from readers that doesn't contain obscenities, and the more mail I answered today about my commentary on Apple's announcement of DRM-free music, the more trouble I had defending it.

Post a Comment

Guess What, Steve -- I Don't Love It

4/3/2007
"We think our customers are going to love this," said Steve Jobs in Apple's press release yesterday announcing that its iTunes store would sell DRM-free versions of EMI's music catalog. Wrong. I like it, but, please, Steve, stop doing me favors that (1) raise music prices 30% and (2) force me to take the extra steps to remove your AAC encoding.

Post a Comment

Copyright: Fair Use Is Your Friend

3/30/2007
Nine out of 10 people would probably tell you copyright is all about big companies maximizing their revenue from the content they own at the expense of the consumer. (The 10th person would tell you copyright is a cornerstone of our American way of life, but he'd turn out to be lawyer for the RIAA, the Recording Industry Association of America). In fact, copyright is as much about your right to make fair use of copyrighted content as it is about the "intellectual property" of corporations. For 11

Post a Comment

How Do You Tell If A Flash Drive Is ReadyBoost-Ready?

3/27/2007
Although my article on ReadyBoost doesn't dwell on it, the Windows Vista feature that creates a code-page cache on a flash drive or flash memory card does put potential users of the feature in a bind, and reader Rich Farkas called me on it almost as soon as the article appeared. How, he wants to know, are potential Vista users supposed to know whether their PC will benefit from ReadyBoost? And

Post a Comment

Tiny Apps For Linux On Slow Hardware

3/26/2007
Linux has a well-deserved reputation for running well on less-powerful hardware than it takes to run Windows, and articles like How To Revive An Old PC With Linux offer lots of good advice. It's a great, no-cost way to get started with Linux. And here's what you'll need next: a great list of tiny, ultra-light-weight applications that will give you maximum computing for minimum footprint on you

Post a Comment

'Garbage Social Networks' -- Does That Mean Twitter?

3/25/2007
The subject line in my email caught my eye immediately: "Thursday -- Garbage Social Networks, E-Flex, and More!" I've been playing with Twitter, and I thought, "Yes! I know just what that means!" It turns out I was wrong: the writer really meant social networks for people interested in reducing the volume of their trash. But I think my version is more interesting, because it explains the incredibly rapid devaluation of social networking as a concept. We really have sunk to the level of garbage s

Post a Comment

RIP Wallnote, Not The Only Victim Of Vista

3/21/2007
Adobe's decision not to upgrade the current versions of its applications for Vista makes it the most visible software maker to struggle with the incompatibilities created by Microsoft's new operating system. But it's hardly the only one. The one I'll miss the most: Wallnote, a nice little Web-based note-taking app that's dying along with Active Desktop.

Post a Comment
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Nov. 10, 2014
Just 30% of respondents to our new survey say their companies are very or extremely effective at identifying critical data and analyzing it to make decisions, down from 42% in 2013. What gives?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.