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Behind The Curtain At Intel Research

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: What Secret Does Your Laptop Hold?
2. Today's Top Story
    - Behind The Curtain At Intel Research
    Related Story:
    - Intel Research Image Gallery
3. Breaking News
    - Lessons Can Be Learned From Homeland Security Weaknesses
    - Lawmakers Request Investigation Into YouTube Video
    - Feds' Own Hacker Cracks Homeland Security Network
    - iPhone Expected To Impact Multi-Touch Screen Market
    - Online Video Becoming A Habit
    - Darpa Seeks Miniature Networking Robots For Urban Combat
    - IBM: The Mainframe Is Alive And Going Strong
    - E.U. Body To Expand Web Search Probe, Write To Google
    - Internet Terrorism Trial Highlights Web Open Info Access Dilemma
    - E.U. Demands Compensation From U.S. For Internet Gambling Ban
4. The Latest Personal Tech Blog Posts
    - Beware Of Sticky Fingers When BlackBerrys Handle State Secrets
    - Will The iPhone Make Consumers Abandon Their Carriers?
    - Hanging With The Grown-Ups
    - We're All In The Same Bloat
5. Job Listings From TechCareers
6. White Papers
    - Five Reasons Every IT Organization Needs To Capitalize On IPMI
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Sin with the multitude, and your responsibility and guilt are as great and as truly personal, as if you alone had done the wrong." -- Tyron Edwards


1. Editor's Note: What Secret Does Your Laptop Hold?

What do you have on your laptop that you might not want anyone else to see?

Is there, for example, a record of your doctor visits and which medications you take? Some music downloaded from the Web that may or may not be copyright-compliant? How about the spreadsheet listing your employees, how much they make, and who may become part of your company's projected layoffs? Or the e-mail you sent to your senator complaining about the treatment you recently receiving from airport security personnel?

How would you like all that to be read by customs agents the next time you come back from, say, London?

A recent InformationWeek article described how former Anaheim, Calif., junior high school math teacher Michael Timothy Arnold's laptop, CDs, and memory stick were examined by border agents at the Los Angeles International Airport when he came back from the Philippines in 2005. A lower court found that the contents of electronic devices are even more personal than, say, a diary, and that agents must have reasonable suspicion before examining the contents. The government disagreed and is appealing. At least two organizations -- the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Association of Corporate Travel Executives -- believe the ruling was correct and have filed an amicus brief with the court.

I usually go through my laptop before a business trip and check it for documents that should be deleted or encrypted -- for example, notes about an ongoing news story or some of the more sensitive interoffice memos that I receive. But besides securing my laptop against theft, should I also wonder whether it will be read by the security personnel at the airport? Should I need to examine the contents of my hard drive each time I fly to make sure that I'm not reading any suspicious texts, carrying around any suspicious videos, or writing any suspicious e-mails?

Some may say that if Mr. Arnold hadn't had illegal files in his computer -- according to the government, his computer contained images of child pornography -- he wouldn't have had anything to worry about. After all, it's only the guilty who have something to hide, right? Well ... no. History teaches us that the most innocuous evidence can be used by authorities to incriminate citizens.

Back in the 1950s, for example, people lost their jobs because they had, years before, belonged to (or given money to, or signed a petition from) organizations that, two decades later, were believed to have ties to (or to share goals with, or to be even vaguely sympathetic to) the Communist Party. Three centuries before that, people were imprisoned and burned as witches or wizards because they had the wrong types of herbs in their gardens or the wrong types of moles on their bodies, or had said the wrong thing to the wrong person at the wrong time.

We now confide many of the facts and events of our personal and professional lives to electronic information devices that we carry with us. It is important that we keep that information safe from random searches.

What are your thoughts on the court's decision? Do you think that federal agents should have the right to check the contents of your laptop without other evidence? Leave a comment at the InformationWeek Blog and let us know.

Barbara Krasnoff
bkrasnoff@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Behind The Curtain At Intel Research
The chip vendor rolls out research prototypes in chips, mobile computing, and tera-scale computing.

Related Story:

Intel Research Image Gallery
Intel researchers show off prototypes of advances in chips, mobile computing, and tera-scale computing.


3. Breaking News

Lessons Can Be Learned From Homeland Security Weaknesses
Companies can learn a few lessons from the security missteps and weaknesses at the Department of Homeland Security. Here are some tips to reduce your vulnerability.

Lawmakers Request Investigation Into YouTube Video
Sen. Chuck Grassley and Rep. Lamar Smith ask the Labor Department to look into a video they say documents H-1B abuse by companies.

Feds' Own Hacker Cracks Homeland Security Network
After a heated congressional hearing on cybersecurity Wednesday, two major security players say there may be many more breaches than reported.

iPhone Expected To Impact Multi-Touch Screen Market
The market for the displays, which respond to multiple touches simultaneously, is expected to grow nearly 31% annually through 2012.

Online Video Becoming A Habit
Watching online video is becoming a routine part of Internet-using Americans' lives, with more than half saying they watch videos online at least once a week.

Darpa Seeks Miniature Networking Robots For Urban Combat
The military wants droids that could intelligently choose locations and self-configure to form a mesh wireless voice/data network that isn't dependent on line of sight.

IBM: The Mainframe Is Alive And Going Strong
The company said its hardware mainframe revenue grew 12% in the first quarter of this year compared with the previous quarter, and 25% year-over-year.

E.U. Body To Expand Web Search Probe, Write To Google
The European Union's data watchdog will expand its investigation of user data retention by Web search engines beyond sector leader Google, a European Commission source said Thursday.

Internet Terrorism Trial Highlights Web Open Info Access Dilemma
The case is the second this year in Switzerland focusing on Islamic terrorism, but the first-ever terrorism case there involving the Internet.

E.U. Demands Compensation From U.S. For Internet Gambling Ban
The European Union is the latest in a handful of foreign governing bodies that have called the U.S. Internet gambling ban illegal and are demanding compensation.

All Our Latest News

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----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Unified Communications
Examine the unified communications and VoIP deployment strategies of more than 300 companies in this new report by InformationWeek Research.

Windows Vista: Meeting Expectations Or Falling Short?
Learn how more than 600 business technology professionals feel about Windows Vista and understand the deployment challenges they're facing in InformationWeek Research's Windows Vista: Meeting Expectations Or Falling Short?

-----------------------------------------


4. The Latest Personal Tech Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/consumerpersonal_tech/index.html

Beware Of Sticky Fingers When BlackBerrys Handle State Secrets
We're not at war with France, at least not the last time I checked, but that doesn't mean that the French want their state secrets coursing through the U.S. telecommunications infrastructure.

Will The iPhone Make Consumers Abandon Their Carriers?
According to a report in the Wall Street Journal, just because someone knows about the iPhone doesn't mean he'll buy it. But it seems some carriers' subscribers may be more vulnerable for poaching than others.

Hanging With The Grown-Ups
A close friend recently sent me an invitation to join a new search service called Spock, which has generated a bit of buzz. But not all the buzz has been favorable -- especially for us XX-chromosome types.

We're All In The Same Bloat
Bloatware is that ugly build-up of annoying code you find on new PCs -- demoware, trial applications and sign-ups, and marketing cruft that you have to deal with when you're setting up a new computer. The guys at PC Pitstop say it's getting worse.


5. Job Listings From TechCareers

Indymac Bank seeking VP of Network Engineering in Pasadena, CA

McCamish Systems seeking Manager of Quality Assurance in Atlanta, GA

Agilent seeking Senior Solutions Architect in Santa Clara, CA

Union Telephone/Union Wireless seeking Network Administration Specialist in Mountain View, WY

D. E. Shaw & Co., L.P seeking Senior Windows Architect in New York, NY

For more great jobs, career-related news, features and services, please visit CMP Media's TechCareers.


6. White Papers

Five Reasons Every IT Organization Needs To Capitalize On IPMI
As a standardized systems management interface, Intelligent Platform Management Interface simplifies the management of today's multivendor environments. Learn how IPMI can help you better manage more infrastructure with fewer resources.


7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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