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Big Data In 2014: 6 Bold Predictions

'Tis the season when temperatures tumble, shoppers stumble, and prognosticators fumble, often. Will these big data prophecies come true?

How will big data evolve in 2014? The future is anyone's guess, of course, but we thought we'd compile a tasty holiday assortment of prognostications from executives working in the big data trenches. So without further delay, here they are -- six big data predictions for next year:

1. "More Hadoop projects will fail than succeed."
That scary assessment is from Gary Nakamura, CEO of Concurrent, a big data application platform company. In a December 12 blog post, Nakamura made a few 2014 forecasts, including this not-so-rosy assessment of Hadoop:

"More Hadoop projects will be swept under the rug as businesses devote major resources to their big data projects before doing their due diligence, which results in a costly, disillusioning project failure. We may not hear about most of the failures, of course, but the successes will clearly demonstrate the importance of using the right tools. The right big data toolkit will enable organizations to easily carry forward the success of these projects, as well as further insert their value into their business processes for market advantage."

[Who are next year's rising stars in business intelligence? Read 2014 BI Outlook: Who's Hot, Who's Not.]

2. Enterprises will focus less on big data and more on stepping up their data management game.
"There's no doubt that companies' pursuits of big data initiatives have the best intentions to improve operational decision making across the enterprise. That being said, companies shouldn't get stuck on the term 'big data.' The true initiative and what they ultimately need to be concerned with is how they're implementing better data management practices that account for the variety and complexity of the data being acquired for analysis," Scott Schlesinger, a senior vice president for consulting and outsourcing giant Capgemini, told InformationWeek via email.

3. The pace of big data innovation in the open-source community will accelerate in 2014.
"New open-source projects like Hadoop 2.0 and YARN, as the next-generation Hadoop resource manager, will make the Hadoop infrastructure more interactive. New open-source projects like STORM, a streaming communications protocol, will enable more real-time, on-demand blending of information in the big data ecosystem," wrote Quentin Gallivan, CEO of business analytics software firm Pentaho, in a December 5 blog post.

4. The need for automated tools will become increasingly critical.
"It seems that the more data we have, the more we want," John Joseph, VP of product marketing for analytics software firm Lavastorm Analytics told InformationWeek via email. "But as data volumes increase, the need for pattern matching, simulation, and predictive analytics technologies become more crucial. Engines that can automatically sift through the growing mass of data, identify issues or opportunities, and even take automated action to capitalize on those findings will be a necessity."

5. Beware, Oracle! 2014 will be the year of SQL on Hadoop.
"I think you'll see people start building interactive applications on the Hadoop infrastructure. And what I mean by that -- and I think this is probably the most controversial thing -- is that people will start replacing their first-generation relational databases with SQL on Hadoop," said Monte Zweben, CEO of SQL-on-Hadoop database startup Splice Machine, in a phone interview with InformationWeek.

6. Big data flies to the cloud.
"Big data has gained a lot of traction in 2013 but complex technologies are keeping many businesses from getting their solutions into production and generating a positive ROI. In 2014, businesses will look beyond the hype and turn to cloud solutions that generate fast time to value and do not require highly specialized dedicated skill sets, like Hadoop, to manage. 2014 will be the year that big data moves from buzzword to business imperative," said Sandy Steier, cofounder and CEO of cloud-based analytics firm 1010data, via email.

Jeff Bertolucci is a technology journalist in Los Angeles who writes mostly for Kiplinger's Personal Finance, the Saturday Evening Post, and InformationWeek.

IT groups need data analytics software that's visual and accessible. Vendors are getting the message. Also in the State Of Analytics issue of InformationWeek: SAP CEO envisions a younger, greener, cloudier company. (Free registration required.)

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KrunoslavK129
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KrunoslavK129,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/17/2014 | 4:22:18 AM
Hadoop or not?
Is it only me, or do others also see incongruency between points 1 and 5? What do you think will be the future of Hadoop? Niche or mainstream technology? Why?
sushantsaraswat
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sushantsaraswat,
User Rank: Strategist
1/15/2014 | 4:38:42 AM
Deploy Big Data solutions in Cloud
Big data analytics is going to be mainstream with increased adoption among every industry and forma virtuous cycle with more people wanting access to even bigger data.

However, often the requirements for big data analysis are really not well understood by the developers and business owners, thus creating an undesirable product.

For organizations to not waste precious time and money and manpower over these issues, there is a need to develop expertise and process of creating small scale prototypes quickly and test them to demonstrate its correctness, matching with business goals.

Following up on this, I came across and registered for a webinar on Deploy Big Data solutions Rapidly in Cloud through Harbinger's ABC model (Agile-Big Data-Cloud), it looks a promising one http://j.mp/19xJ6ew
aditshar
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aditshar,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/26/2013 | 6:30:52 AM
Re: Cloud Data
After security and storage, one challenge i see with Big Data is how we can capture the most important data as it happens and deliver that to the right people in real-time.
how we can capture the most important data as it happens and deliver that to the right people in real-time. - See more at: http://spotfire.tibco.com/blog/?p=6793#sthash.6PQXFwvi.dpuf
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2013 | 12:06:08 AM
Re: Cloud Data
For the enterprise the security is always of major concern. I cannot imagine that the big enterprise, especially those ones that have concern on IPR, information security will put their own data to public cloud. They may deploy their private cloud solution but then we create the silos. Establishing big data platform and cloud computing from scratch is costly and time-consuming. So we need to leverage the service from public cloud/big-data vendors. But the security is always of concern.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
12/23/2013 | 3:25:35 PM
Cloud Data
I have doubts about companies putting critical big data sets in public clouds for analysis. Is the trust high enough, and the transport speeds fast and cheap enough, to make this leap in the coming year?
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
12/23/2013 | 2:37:58 PM
Big/Small Data
As for No. 2, most companies still aren't very good at small data. Get that right first, project by project. Get some important wins under your belt. 

 
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