Internet Of Things 'Overhyped,' Say IT Execs - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
Data Management // Big Data Analytics
News
11/17/2014
11:00 AM
Connect Directly
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
CAO Discusses Their Roll & The Skills Needed to Do the Job
Jul 26, 2017
LWhat does a chief analytics officer do each day? To help us answer that question we welcome Dun & ...Read More>>

Internet Of Things 'Overhyped,' Say IT Execs

IT executives expect the IoT to impact their businesses, although they're not sure how, finds CompTIA survey.

10 Smart Tech Toys For Kids
10 Smart Tech Toys For Kids
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

The terms "big data" and "Internet of Things" have a lot in common. Both represent significant technological trends involving the collection, storage, and analysis of vast sums of digital information. Both have been hyped to the max and usurped by marketers. And both have left many a businessperson -- even tech sophisticates like IT executives -- scratching their heads and wondering what these latest buzzwords are all about.

In that context, perhaps the findings from a recent survey of IT executives by the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA), an IT trade group, aren't too surprising. The report, "Sizing Up the Internet of Things," found that IT execs believe the Internet of Things (IoT) will help their business in a to-be-determined fashion, but they're not really doing much to prepare for it.

CompTIA's online survey was conducted in July 2014. Nearly 300 US IT companies participated, ranging from small shops to Fortune 500 firms.

"Overall, IT industry executives are nearly evenly split on their view of IoT hype," the report stated. Specifically, 51% of respondents believe IoT opportunities justify the hoopla, while 48% "see more hype than substance at this point in time."

[What IoT technologies can improve your business? See Rise Of Things: IoT's Role In Business Processes.]

The survey also found that only 8% of IT execs have explored potential IoT product offerings. That's surprisingly low when you consider that major tech analysts, including Gartner and IDC, predict the IoT will be a several trillion dollar industry within a decade.

This hesitation may be due, in part, to the lack of standards in the Internet of Things ecosystem, where countless numbers of data-sharing sensors, devices, and software must communicate seamlessly. But as of September 2014, four major organizations -- AllSeen Alliance, Open Interconnect Consortium, Thread, and Industrial Internet Consortium -- were developing standards for the IoT.

"I think this is going to look a lot like the Internet when it got started," said Seth Robinson, senior director of technology analysis at CompTIA, in a phone interview with InformationWeek. "The Internet required certain protocols to become commonly used ... and to really be of benefit."

(Source: CompTIA)
(Source: CompTIA)

Today's IoT, however, is more like the Tower of Babel. Consider the consumer market: As people experiment with smart homes, they assume the responsibility of getting various devices to communicate not only with their smartphones but also with each other, including hardware from different manufacturers.

"It's difficult to get everything to talk to each other, and there are a lot of competing standards out there right now," said Robinson, who expects that market forces, not government regulation, will determine which IoT standards contender will "win out in the end."

IoT privacy is one area where government regulation will likely play a major role, however.

"Privacy is definitely a problem that we haven't solved yet. It's related to IT security, which is another one we haven't solved," Robinson said. "It's a very complicated matter, one I don't see resolving itself in the near future."

Privacy restrictions also may impact the prices of IoT devices, particularly if vendors are prohibited from selling consumer data they acquire from sensors and related IoT products.

"Privacy, when it comes to computing and connected devices, is very difficult to sort out," said Robinson. "So many people enjoy services at a very low price point, and I don't think they've fully realized that the low price point is there because of the data they're willing to share."

IoT vendors will need to be reasonably transparent, telling the public what data they're collecting and how they're using it. If this doesn't happen, "we're probably going to need some kind of regulations to help establish boundaries for this space," said Robinson.

How cloud, virtualization, mobility, and other network-altering trends impact security -- and the IT pros responsible for infrastructure protection. Get the Network Security Career Guide issue of Network Computing today.

Jeff Bertolucci is a technology journalist in Los Angeles who writes mostly for Kiplinger's Personal Finance, The Saturday Evening Post, and InformationWeek. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
asksqn
50%
50%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
11/29/2014 | 1:27:11 PM
IoT: Over-hyped and invasive
IoT is not only a Tower of Babel as concerns communication among devices, it's also a privacy nightmare for consumers not wishing to have their private data bought/sold/traded by unknown third parties for unknown reasons.  
Ashu001
50%
50%
Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
11/19/2014 | 11:53:32 AM
Re: Security & Privacy
Sachin,

What you point out are fair and very reasonable points.

However(and I am sure you will also agree here);that Security & Privacy is something which is an afterthought with most Tech today .

It is something which is bolted on later on after the Technology has gained some form of Traction.

That's what causes majority of the problems around it today.

Do correct me if I am wrong here.

Regards

Ashish.

P.S

No I don't for one instance think its amazing that how people give away loads of biometric data and personal data while using smartphones and internet and the very same people have security problems with IOT?


If these Policies on utilization of User Data were written in Easy to understand terms HALF of all consumers would'nt sign up for those Apps.

It quite similar to what happened with the Obamacare debacle-As Jonathan Gruber(the mastermind behind Obamacare) said it-Basically Americans are stupid so we make the policy so complicated that nobody can understand it so that they blindly accept everything.

More here-youtu.be/G790p0LcgbI &  here- youtu.be/8Hcu1S2GKf0

 
SachinEE
50%
50%
SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
11/19/2014 | 5:43:32 AM
Re: Security & Privacy
"It is important for the end users. However, everyone is not aware of what is being transmitted and to what they are clicking "I agree". Some are very concerned about the way data are handled, some are kind of lenient. "

@zaious: It is true, and the ruthless IOT campaiging at the start of 2013 till the end of that year has been responsible for this kind of "security" risk education. If at the bud stages IOT was marketed the right way as a safe technoology, people wouldn't be having such concerns. Isn't it amazing how people give away loads of biometric data and personal data while using smartphones and internet and the very same people have security problems with IOT?
SachinEE
50%
50%
SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
11/19/2014 | 5:39:20 AM
IOT hype vs Consumer practices
""It's difficult to get everything to talk to each other, and there are a lot of competing standards out there right now," said Robinson, who expects that market forces, not government regulation, will determine which IoT standards contender will "win out in the end.""

Although it is true that the IT industry really hyped up the IOT industry with all of the interesting "gadgets" it had to show, the overall growth of IOT in the IT industry itself has been minimum. This has led the consumers to take a step back and watch on how IOT is installed in the IT sector. This kind of consumer behaviour would be driven back if and only if IOT is marketed using educationary channels that would make consumers come out of the thought bubble and make decisions for themselves.

 
zaious
50%
50%
zaious,
User Rank: Ninja
11/18/2014 | 11:58:39 PM
Re: Security & Privacy
It is important for the end users. However, everyone is not aware of what is being transmitted and to what they are clicking "I agree". Some are very concerned about the way data are handled, some are kind of lenient. 
maniong
50%
50%
maniong,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/18/2014 | 5:31:15 PM
Internet of Things
From what I see currently, might it not be better to have an internet of useful things. This should make a list of only a dozen of so things. Much easier to manage.
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
11/17/2014 | 5:24:47 PM
Re: The danger is tsunamis is overhyped too...
The difficulty with IoT as a term is that it's just too broad. Whether consumers will flock to Internet-connected door locks is a different question than whether manufacturers will deploy more sensors to monitor assembly lines. Certainly some aspects of IoT, specifically the consumer angle, are long on hope and short on sales. (Nest is not going to have people replacing their smoke detectors every year or two, the way smartphone owners have been doing.) But the notion that things can ba managed better with processors and networking has a lot to recommend it.
Charlie Babcock
50%
50%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
11/17/2014 | 4:46:47 PM
The danger is tsunamis is overhyped too...
It's easy to say the Internet of Things is overhyped, just as it's easy to say the danger of tsunamis is over-rated. Of course it's over-rated, until it arrives in your harbor. I think a knowledgeable IT manager will try to imagine what an Internet of Things will look like, how it will change his customers, his market and ultimately what he's called on to do. The early implementers, like the Nest thermostat and utility smart meters, have had to overcome plenty of  consumer resistance, without fully addressing security. That is, ease of implementation has trumped protection in depth. Once consumers want to engage with the Internet of Things, the security issue will be more fully addressed (I hope).
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/17/2014 | 3:35:39 PM
IoT security
Even the device makers understand that the lack of common security standards and other interoperability standards will hold them back.
BrianB438
50%
50%
BrianB438,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/17/2014 | 3:20:45 PM
Security & Privacy

Security and Privacy are always the afterthought.  We are in an emerging time where data collected from devices is an advertisers homerun.  It's important that we question who owns the information collected by the devices and what the policies and rights are properties of the information. IoT and the associated products that enable information gathering need both an alignment for interoperability and security/privacy practices.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
IT Strategies to Conquer the Cloud
Chances are your organization is adopting cloud computing in one way or another -- or in multiple ways. Understanding the skills you need and how cloud affects IT operations and networking will help you adapt.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll