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5/6/2014
04:48 PM
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Moore's Law's New Friend: POET Chip

Technology in development for more than two decades might extend the life of Moore's law, says POET Technologies.

A technology in development for more than two decades might have the answer for extending the end of Moore's law, according to a company coming out of stealth mode.

POET Technologies derives its name from "planar opto-electronic technology," which is its gallium arsenide (GaAs) process used to build electrical, optical, and electro-optical integrated circuits. It is the result of research spearheaded by Geoffrey Taylor, the company's chief scientist, who has been directing its development and is concurrently a professor of electrical engineering and photonics at the University of Connecticut, where the company houses its research and development facilities.

Taylor's three decades of experience in design and development in electronic and optical device physics, circuit design, and opto-electronic technology, materials, and applications has been critical to the development of the POET platform. As part of a presentation to EE Times, the company outlined the heart of POET platform. It is a patented materials system that supports monolithic fabrication of integrated circuits containing active and passive optical performance analog and digital elements.

Read the rest of this article on EE Times.

Gary Hilson is a Toronto-based freelance writer who has written thousands of words for print and pixel in publications across North America. His areas of interest and expertise include software, enterprise and networking technology, memory systems, green energy, sustainable ... View Full Bio

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batye
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batye,
User Rank: Ninja
5/10/2014 | 1:32:46 AM
Re: GaAs?
interesting to know... each time I learn something new...
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
5/6/2014 | 10:30:15 PM
GaAs?
The term GaAs immediately drew my interest, due to the restistance of GaAs devices to EMP. If GaAs devices aren't being produced here, what is meant by a "gallium arsenide (GaAs) process", which is mentioned here and in the EE Times article?
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