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3/18/2014
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Microsoft Releases In-Memory Ready SQL Server 2014

Microsoft SQL Server's newest release adds in-memory OLTP (online transaction processing) and Azure cloud deployment options to the popular database management system. Here's why that's important.

Microsoft SQL Server 2014 has been released to manufacturing, the company announced on Tuesday, promising general availability of the product on April 1. The company also announced the general availability of Hadoop 2.2 support in its Windows Azure HDInsight service, bringing support for YARN and Stinger (Hive SQL Query) improvements to the vendor's cloud-based Hadoop service.

Any release of Microsoft SQL Server is important, as it's the world's top database management system (DBMS) in terms of unit sales. But the 2014 update is particularly important as it introduces an In-Memory OLTP (online transaction processing) option that promises breakthroughs in performance.

"In-memory transaction processing speeds up an already very fast experience by delivering speed improvement of up to 30x," wrote Quentin Clark, corporate VP of Microsoft's Data Platform Group, in a blog announcing the release.

[Want more on this performance enhancement? Read In-Memory Databases: Do You Need The Speed?]

As InformationWeek recently detailed in an in-depth cover story on in-memory databases, Microsoft beta customers have used In-Memory OLTP to get around disk I/O-throughput bottlenecks and read-write contention without rewriting applications designed to run on SQL Server. Gaming company Bwin.party, for example, used the feature to scale up an online sports-betting app to handle 150,000 bets per second that was previously limited to 12,000 bets per second. The only change required was moving selected database tables to run in memory.

Announced three years ago as project Hekaton, the In-Memory OLTP feature has been tested by dozens of companies working directly with Microsoft as part of its Technology Adoption Program. In addition, some 200,000 customers have downloaded or tested virtual instances of the DBMS as part of two Community Technology Previews that began last June, according to Microsoft.

The In-Memory OLTP option is far from the only enhancement delivered in the 2014 release. A hybrid deployment option gives customers the choice of running SQL Server 2014 on premises or on Windows Azure. A typical scenario envisioned is running production instances on premises while syncing with backup-and-recovery instances in the cloud.

Other new Microsoft SQL Server 2014 improvements include:

  • Cardinality-estimation enhancements automatically improve the efficiency of internal query planning, according to Microsoft, thereby speeding new and existing queries. When complex queries require customized tuning, the feature can be turned off to ensure consistent query execution.
  • AlwaysOn high-availability features now support more database replicas and have been extended into Windows Azure. Virtual instances on Azure can easily be configured as part of an AlwaysOn availability group.
  • An in-memory column store feature is now updatable. This analytic feature used to be an index, with querying against a separate row-store table; it's now a true column that's updatable and the only place the data is stored. Benefits include reduced storage costs, improved data compression, and, most importantly, faster query performance, according to Microsoft.

Faster transaction processing is clearly the biggest promise of Microsoft SQL Server 2014, and it's available to a huge installed base that won't have to make changes in applications or even in hardware, according to Microsoft. It's a claim that Microsoft customers including Bwin.party and Edgenet have validated in interviews with InformationWeek. Both customers took advantage of the In-Memory OLTP feature on existing servers, though Microsoft has said that extensive use of the feature might require upgrades in available memory.

SAP Hana has been the poster child of the in-memory movement in recent years, but that platform runs entirely in memory, so it demands all new servers as well as modifications to applications that were designed to run on other databases. Where Hana had to start from scratch without a legacy installed base (and now has around 1,000 customers), Microsoft has a built-in head start on in-memory adoption with hundreds of thousands of current SQL Server customers.

Microsoft's announcement of Hadoop 2.2 support in its Windows Azure HDInsight service comes as little surprise, as the Apache open source improvements were released last fall. Hortonworks and Cloudera announced their releases built on 2.2 in October and February, respectively, and Pivotal jointed the club with its Pivotal HD 2.0 release on Monday. Microsoft and its partner Hortonworks, the developer of HDInsight, will undoubtedly follow up with an updated on-premises software distribution within a matter of days or weeks.

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Doug Henschen is Executive Editor of InformationWeek, where he covers the intersection of enterprise applications with information management, business intelligence, big data and analytics. He previously served as editor in chief of Intelligent Enterprise, editor in chief of ... View Full Bio

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VladiV579
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VladiV579,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/29/2014 | 5:27:41 AM
Capabilities and Limitations of SQL 2014 In-Memory and other In-Memory Caching solutions
Hi,
Thanks for this good article.
I found another very interesting and very comprehensive article about the SQL Server 2014 capabilities, limitations, migration plan options:

http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2014/04/30/sql-server-faster-application-performance-with-in-memory-oltp-microsoft-sql-server-2014-and-safepeak-dynamic-caching/

It also compares the new In-Memory OLTP engine with few additional technologies, including the automated dynamic caching solution by SafePeak

 
NaiyingL805
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NaiyingL805,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/19/2014 | 2:24:47 PM
i agree with you
When there's 35 million ring fenced for mental health as there was this year and hopefully again next year it's not good enough for the HSE to just do as they wish with it.. There are a many green alkaline drinks that promote health and overall well being. More importantly, stay away from simple carbs like table sugar, cakes, candies, and white bread. My doctor couldn remember my name after 5 months. Population and States may not be able to pull in these individuals into health care exchanges, unless strategic steps were incorporated to address the language and other enrollment barriers, these individuals faced. chanel outlet online gucci borse
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
3/18/2014 | 4:56:45 PM
Re: MS SQL Server
In-Memory OLTP is a standard feature, not an extra-cost feature. It's an "option" in that it's there if you need it, but you don't have to put tables into memory if you don't need that acceleration.

 

Pricing of the database has not been released.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
3/18/2014 | 3:21:55 PM
A big step
This is a big step forward in Microsoft's database capabilities. The ability to use SQL Server on premises and synch with a version of SQL Server in Azure will spur Azure use.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
3/18/2014 | 1:20:08 PM
Re: MS SQL Server
Doug, Any word on cost? Is Microsoft going to provide the in-memory capability in the standard release, or will customers need to pony up for higher-end versions?
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
3/18/2014 | 1:19:22 PM
Boster's big-data analysis opportunities.
Microsoft's Quentin Clark tells me that some customers have used In-Memory OLTP tables in a high-scale caching role (think Memcached) whereby a in-memory table is used for high-scale, high-speed ingest. In this role it acts as a kind of data shock absorber where data can be buffered, transformed and delivered to a variety of applications and analyses. I'm sure there will be many novel implementations of in-memory tables that Microsoft never envisioned. 

I'm sure this release also will heat up the ongoing market-share battle with Oracle. Microsoft SQL Server gained front-runner status in terms of unit sales many years ago. Clark tells me the latest stats from IDC show that SQL Server recently eclipsed IBM DB2 in terms of software revenue market share among DBMSs. 

Microsoft is counting on lower SQL Server costs to win the day against Oracle Database. Oracle points to scalability and industrial-strength perfomance, but Microsoft's new In-Memory OLTP option will help on that score. Stay tuned, though, as Oracle is epected to introduce its own in-memory capabilities this year. This was pre-announced at Oracle Open World last year, but this year expect beta product announcements at OOW 2014 and general release late this year or early next year.

 
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/18/2014 | 12:53:34 PM
MS SQL Server
Great context here, Doug. The point re SAP Hana is not lost on customers, either, I'm sure.
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