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Can Microsoft Get Its Mojo Back?

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Can Microsoft Get Its Mojo Back?
2. Today's Top Story
    - Review: NeoOffice -- The Best Mac Office Suite Money Can't Buy
3. Breaking News
    - CEO Eric Schmidt Presents Google's Friendly Face At Web 2.0 Expo
    - Why Online Games Are Dictatorships
    - Students Identified As Virginia Tech Massacre Prompts Online Remembrances
    - Facebook Becomes Bulletin Board For Virginia Tech Community
    - Suspect, Some Victims Named In Virginia Tech Massacre
    - Questions Surround Virginia Tech Security In Wake Of Shooting Rampage
    - Vonage Says Its Chances Of Developing Patent 'Workarounds' Are Grim
    - Sun, Fujitsu Unveil 'Fastest Sparc Server Ever'
    - DOJ Gets Fifth Conviction In P2P Piracy Crackdown
    - Microsoft Can't Use Own Software To Pay Washington State Taxes
    - Would You Give Up Deodorant Or A Spouse For E-Mail?
    - Tellme Unveils Mobile Search At Web 2.0
    - Maine Moves To Require Cell Phone Recycling
    - Indian IT Outsourcing Firms Plan To Keep Staff With Double-Digit Salary Raises
    - In Web 2.0 Keynote, Jeff Bezos Touts Amazon's On-Demand Services
    - Porn Found On One In Four Corporate PCs
    - IBM First-Quarter Earnings Up 12%
4. The Latest Mobile Blog Posts
    - Carnival Of The Mobilists #69
    - Google's Deal For DoubleClick Could Be The End Of Yahoo
    - Apple May Subsidize iPhone: Another Sign The iPhone Is In Trouble?
    - Survey Respondents Not Warming Up To The Idea Of Wi-Fi-Only Phones
5. Job Listings From TechCareers
6. White Papers
    - Rules For Smarter Business Processes
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"I don't want any yes-men around me. I want everybody to tell me the truth even if it costs them their jobs." -- Samuel Goldwyn


1. Editor's Note: Can Microsoft Get Its Mojo Back?

The Internet moves quickly, but perhaps you remember this essay from that long-ago time of last week (gosh, we were so much younger then, weren't we?). In it, developer Paul Graham argues that Microsoft is dead, killed by Web applications and buried by the Apple comeback. I do think there's some truth to Graham's essay -- but it's only part of the story. InformationWeek's J. Nicholas Hoover tells the rest, describing Microsoft's plans for embracing Web applications, coming back from the dead like the zombies in Michael Jackson's Thriller video.

Graham, who set off a spam-fighting revolution five years ago, starts out by describing how a young startup founder is baffled by the notion that startups were, not too long ago, frightened of Microsoft. "Microsoft cast a shadow over the software world for almost 20 years starting in the late 80s. I can remember when it was IBM before them. ... But it's gone now. I can sense that. No one is even afraid of Microsoft anymore. They still make a lot of money -- so does IBM, for that matter. But they're not dangerous."

But just because Microsoft is dead, the industry shouldn't write it off. For its first two decades or so, Microsoft was a company that reinvented itself every few years: going from Internet-denial to embracing the Internet in 1995 and spending the rest of the decade gaining Internet dominance; entering the applications business with its Office suite; entering the server business with Windows NT, Exchange, and SQL Server; and transitioning from the command-line DOS operating system to Windows. Through it all, it's been a top creator of development tools.

But in recent years, Microsoft has lost its mojo. Microsoft today is essentially the same company it was in 2001, when Windows XP came out -- but less. The company has the same product lineup, with a few updates.

Windows Vista is the perfect symbol of Microsoft's current place in the computer industry: It's Microsoft's strongest-selling operating system to date, and yet only 12% of users plan to upgrade this year. That's Microsoft today: a financial juggernaut, but unable to generate user excitement.

But don't count Microsoft dead until you've seen the body. As Hoover describes, Microsoft is on an ambitious drive to marry rich desktop and server applications with Internet-based services. As part of that effort, Microsoft is working on a hush-hush project called Windows Live Core, designed to operate as a foundation for integrated Web and desktop services. The company also plans a hosted CRM app; financial services community; services to help host Exchange, SharePoint Server, and Live Communication Server for big companies; and more.

What do you think? Has Microsoft lost its mojo? And if so, can it get it back? Leave a message on the InformationWeek Blog and let us know.

Mitch Wagner
mwagner@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Review: NeoOffice -- The Best Mac Office Suite Money Can't Buy
If you're a Mac user who doesn't want to spend a lot -- or any -- money on an office suite, you may want to give NeoOffice a try.


3. Breaking News

CEO Eric Schmidt Presents Google's Friendly Face At Web 2.0 Expo
The DoubleClick acquisition, Schmidt said, will benefit both Internet users in the form of more relevant ads and publishers in the form of technology to serve relevant ads.

Why Online Games Are Dictatorships
Online games like World of Warcraft and Second Life are absolute dictatorships, where the whim of the companies controlling them is law. Cory Doctorow wonders if it's possible to create a game that's a democracy, where your in-world property is really yours.

Students Identified As Virginia Tech Massacre Prompts Online Remembrances
Leveraging the power of the Internet and their own multimedia skills, students and faculty at Virginia Tech have compiled moving online accounts of Monday's campus massacre.

Facebook Becomes Bulletin Board For Virginia Tech Community
The "I'm ok at VT" group on Facebook has become an online bulletin board for Virginia Tech students to post their whereabouts after the campus shooting.

Suspect, Some Victims Named In Virginia Tech Massacre
Virginia Tech identified the campus shooter as a 23-year-old South Korean native who was a senior studying English at the school.

Questions Surround Virginia Tech Security In Wake Of Shooting Rampage
The gunman who killed 32 people at Virginia Tech was an Asian male who was a student at the university and a dormitory resident, university president Charles Steger told CNN on Tuesday.

Vonage Says Its Chances Of Developing Patent 'Workarounds' Are Grim
Vonage also indicated that there's no assurance workarounds could ever be produced.

Sun, Fujitsu Unveil 'Fastest Sparc Server Ever'
The servers deliver a 50% performance boost and blend Fujitsu's mainframe technology with Sun's Solaris operating system, which is offered under Sun's open source license.

DOJ Gets Fifth Conviction In P2P Piracy Crackdown
The Justice Department is going after people committing copyright infringement over peer-to-peer networks.

Microsoft Can't Use Own Software To Pay Washington State Taxes
Windows Vista is incompatible with the state's electronic filing system, according to a bulletin published by the State of Washington Employment Security Department.

Would You Give Up Deodorant Or A Spouse For E-Mail?
A survey shows that people would be willing to forgo a lot of things rather than give up e-mail. They'd say "see yah" to coffee, TV, and even their homes.

Tellme Unveils Mobile Search At Web 2.0
The speech recognition company launches a mobile application for local business search only a month after it said it would be acquired by Microsoft.

Maine Moves To Require Cell Phone Recycling
A Maine legislator says it will be beneficial to keep the toxic chemicals found in cell phones out of the environment.

Indian IT Outsourcing Firms Plan To Keep Staff With Double-Digit Salary Raises
People needed include those skilled in a variety of enterprise applications, including SAP, PeopleSoft, and Siebel; IT architects and database administrators; and project managers.

In Web 2.0 Keynote, Jeff Bezos Touts Amazon's On-Demand Services
Bezos pitched Amazon's pay-as-you-go infrastructure -- including offerings such as Simple Storage Service -- as a cost-conscious way for companies to manage IT services for their e-commerce operations.

Porn Found On One In Four Corporate PCs
Think there aren't any pornographic images on your users' desktops or laptops? Think again. A new study shows that they're being downloaded and sent via e-mail through the office.

IBM First-Quarter Earnings Up 12%
Revenue climbed 7% to $22 billion while net income increased 8% to $1.8 billion for the quarter.

All Our Latest News

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----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Software As A Service
Is your organization considering software as a service? Learn about software delivery strategies from 250 business technology professionals in this new InformationWeek Research report. Use this report to understand how your peers are making SaaS part of their existing technology initiatives and what challenges they face.

Moving Toward Enterprise 2.0
Web 2.0 technologies are proliferating in the consumer market. How will your organization adopt these technologies in the enterprise? This InformationWeek Research report, Enterprise 2.0, will provide a glimpse into the adoption of Web 2.0 applications in the enterprise environment. Use this report to evaluate adoption plans and understand the challenges and impact these technologies will have on users.

Benchmark Your Security Strategies
We invite you to benchmark your security strategies and tactics against those of your global peers with this fast, informative, and confidential security tool from InformationWeek and Accenture, a management consulting and technology services company.
To participate in the 2007 Security Survey, go to:
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-----------------------------------------


4. The Latest Mobile Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/mobile/

Carnival Of The Mobilists #69
The Carnival of the Mobilists #69 is up over at mobile marketing & spam. This week's edition features blog posts on a number of topics, including mobile user experience, mobile services, driving demand for mobile data, the issues surrounding the business of being a handset OEM, and mobile commerce. Check it out.

Google's Deal For DoubleClick Could Be The End Of Yahoo
Unless you live in a cave (not that there's anything wrong with that), you probably know by now that late last week Google agreed to buy online ad services company DoubleClick for $3.1 billion. Google paid through the nose for DoubleClick -- roughly 10 times revenue. Everyone has been talking about how this deal kept Microsoft from owning the display ad space. While I think that was one of the reasons Google executed this deal, there's a bigger one. Combined with AdWords, DoubleClick could give Google the ammunition it needs to kill Yahoo.

Apple May Subsidize iPhone: Another Sign The iPhone Is In Trouble?
One analyst claims that Apple is seriously considering a subsidy strategy for the iPhone. This is completely the opposite of what Apple planned to do when it launched the iPhone in January. Could this be yet another sign that Apple is scrambling to save the iPhone?

Survey Respondents Not Warming Up To The Idea Of Wi-Fi-Only Phones
Almost 25% of respondents to In-Stat's online survey said "no thanks" to the idea of phones powered solely by Wi-Fi. The rest of the respondents indicated only minimal interest. Is the technology DOA?


5. Job Listings From TechCareers

Ernst and Young seeking Capacity Planning/Network Forecasting and Planning in Lyndhurst, NJ

Calypso Medical Technologies seeking Software Systems Manager in Seattle, WA

Ohio University seeking Information Security Director in Athens, OH

McCamish Systems seeking Documentation Imaging Analyst in Atlanta, GA

Ernst and Young seeking Associate Director Information Security Architecture in Lyndhurst, NJ

For more great jobs, career-related news, features and services, please visit CMP Media's TechCareers.


6. White Papers

Rules For Smarter Business Processes
Business rules are key when using business process management to automate business processes. This paper will answer may frequently asked questions, such as: If I automate a process, how do I control it? If I outsource a process, how do I customize it? If I automate a process, how do I automate the decisions within it?


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