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9/18/2006
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Celebrating The Web

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Celebrating The Web
2. Today's Top Story
    - Microsoft Gives Details On Zune
    Related Stories:
    - Apple iTunes 7 Draws Complaints
    - Analysts' Take On Zune: Give It Some Time
3. Breaking News
    - The Online Supernova: 15 Years Of The World Wide Web
    - Microsoft Re-Opens Vista RC1 For New Testers
    - Mozilla's New Security Chief: Dump Old Code
    - In-Flight Communications System On Tap For Boeing Aircraft
    - Linspire To Share Revenue With Linux System Builders
    - California May File Charges In HP Case In A Week
    - AOL Patches Buggy Browser
    - Symantec-Juniper Mega-Deal: Merger Preview?
    - Despite PC Drama, New Battery Tech Still Years Away
    - Sony Unveils Blu-Ray Disc Recorder
    - U.S. Likely To Keep Control Of Internet Name System
    - Segway Recalls Scooters For Software Snafu
4. Grab Bag
    - Protect Yourself From Pretexting (Wired News)
    - Silicon Valley's Golden Past Tarnished By Latest Probes (Washington Post)
    - Philanthropy Google's Way (New York Times - Reg. Required)
5. In Depth: Reviews And Personal Tech
    - 6 Tips To Protect Online Search Privacy
    - Review: Iomega's Rev 70 Gbyte Drive Might Make Tape Obsolete
    - High Definition Throws Wrench In TiVo-To-Go
    - Sony Goes For Fashion Statement With New Notebooks
    - MapQuest Driving Directions Find Voice
    - Google Adds Multimedia Content To Earth
6. Voice Of Authority
    - A New Path To SOA: Follow The Customer Data
7. White Papers
    - Lessons Learned: Top Reasons For PCI Audit Failure
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Anyone who has lost track of time when using a computer knows the propensity to dream, the urge to make dreams come true, and the tendency to miss lunch." -- Tim Berners-Lee


1. Editor's Note: Celebrating The Web

A significant tech anniversary quietly slipped by last month. Fifteen years ago, Tim Berners-Lee made public a little project he was working on. He called it the WorldWideWeb.

In our story "The Online Supernova: 15 Years Of The World Wide Web," we trace the history of this meteoric medium, from its beginnings as an obscure information-sharing tool for scientific researchers to its status today as social networking mecca. It's truly an amazing journey.

Nowadays the Web even has its own holiday: OneWebDay, to be celebrated for the first time one week from today. According to its Web site, "The mission of OneWebDay is to create, maintain, advance, and promote a global day to celebrate online life." How do we do that? The site has a few decidedly Web 2.0 suggestions:

  • Post a picture to Webshots.com and tag it with the keyword "onewebday"—it will become part of a huge, worldwide photo collage.

  • Make a video in honor of the Web and post it on Blip.tv with a "onewebday" tag to have it included in a video presentation on Dabble.com.

  • Blog about how the Web has changed your life.

    Well, shoot—you don't have to ask me twice.

    In 1994, I was working for a computer book publisher in San Francisco when I began hearing buzz about a new medium: the World Wide Web. ("It's the Internet, but with pictures.") After a quick demo, I was hooked. I maneuvered my way onto Web-related book projects, learned HTML, and won the envy of my colleagues by being one of the first editors in my office to get Netscape. (We didn't call it getting Internet access or getting a Web browser. We called it getting Netscape.)

    By late 1995, the dot-com hiring boom had begun in earnest. Book editors began jumping ship left and right to join online startups. Who wouldn't? Why stay with boring old book publishing when you could be creating a new form of media? I went to CNET.com in 1996, and I've been in Web publishing ever since.

    While it's only natural that I was excited about the Web back then, what surprises me is that I'm still excited about it, if for different reasons. It's fascinating to look back at the early browsers and Web sites—they were indeed technological marvels—but today's Web tools let us do so much more. These days you don't have to be in publishing to have a public voice: Anyone with a computer and Net access (preferably broadband) can write a blog, upload a video, or map their friends on Google Maps.

    It's not all sunshine and lollipops, of course. Today's social networking sites must deal with issues of copyright, privacy, cyberstalking, and more. We all have to worry about what private information—true or false—about us is out there somewhere on the Web, and who might have access to it. But overall I can't help but be glad I work in a medium that's changing and growing every day.

    OneWebDay is fast approaching. Come on, pitch in: What was your first experience with the Web? What's your favorite thing about the Web today? How would you like to see the Web change in the future? Share your thoughts and stories at my blog entry.

    Correction: Many of you noticed a typo in Wednesday's Editor's Note. We should've said HP is looking to cut the time its IT people spend on maintenance and support to 20% by 2009, down from 54% today. Our copy said the company was increasing that percentage—and many of you realized that isn't what CIO Randy Mott has in mind. Here's the corrected entry.

    Valerie Potter
    vpotter@cmp.com
    www.informationweek.com


    2. Today's Top Story

    Microsoft Gives Details On Zune
    The Zune music player includes at least one feature missing from the iPod: the ability to move content wirelessly.

    Related Stories:

    Apple iTunes 7 Draws Complaints
    Problems posted on Apple discussion forums include sound distortion, songs skipping, 3-second delays in playing tunes, and lost tracks. The company hasn't yet responded to or commented on these issues.

    Analysts' Take On Zune: Give It Some Time
    One thing is for sure: Microsoft is looking for new growth engines in consumer electronics, and Zune is a big part of that push. Still, catching up to Apple won't be easy.


    3. Breaking News

    The Online Supernova: 15 Years Of The World Wide Web
    In August, the World Wide Web celebrated its 15-year anniversary. Where did it come from, and how did we get to where we are today? We bring you an opinionated history.

    Microsoft Re-Opens Vista RC1 For New Testers
    At a Microsoft site, users can request a DVD or download the 3 Gbyte file for the 32-bit version of the operating system.

    Mozilla's New Security Chief: Dump Old Code
    Window Snyder, whose hiring was announced last week, says she wants to get going. Her first initiative is to reduce the overall risk to Firefox by evaluating where there are unused features and by getting rid of the unused code.

    In-Flight Communications System On Tap For Boeing Aircraft
    After Boeing decided to shut down its Connexion service, the airline has awarded a contract to a Wisconsin company for hardware adaptation, engineering development, and various U.S. governmental approval processes.

    Linspire To Share Revenue With Linux System Builders
    The Linux provider will pay system makers a percentage on all commercial Linux software and services that customers buy.

    California May File Charges In HP Case In A Week
    The state's attorney general said in a TV interview that his office has enough evidence to file charges against people in HP, as well as outside contractors hired by the computer maker for investigation into the media leaks.

    AOL Patches Buggy Browser
    According to an alert posted by security company iDefense, AOL's browser uses a flawed method to render compressed images in the .art format. End result: The computer is hijacked.

    Symantec-Juniper Mega-Deal: Merger Preview?
    In addition to co-marketing each other's products, the two companies will begin to fortify Juniper's networking wares with Symantec's anti-spam technology, IDS/IPS signatures, and vulnerability information and research. Can a full-fledged merger be far behind?

    Despite PC Drama, New Battery Tech Still Years Away
    It's going to take five or more years to develop technology that satisfies all the requirements to be light, small, durable, and "relatively safe," in the words of one industry watcher.

    Sony Unveils Blu-Ray Disc Recorder
    Sony plans to introduce a player in the U.S. next month. But the first product for the Japanese market other than the PlayStation 3 will be a recorder.

    U.S. Likely To Keep Control Of Internet Name System
    On Sept. 30, the existing memorandum of understanding between ICANN and the Commerce Department will expire, but one State Department official says the government should extend its control.

    Segway Recalls Scooters For Software Snafu
    A software update must be applied at a dealership or service center, said Segway, which has set up a toll-free number and a section of its Web site to take upgrade requests.

    All Our Latest News


    ----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

    Adopting SOA Is Challenging
    The business advantages of SOA/Web services adoption are clear: standardization, business-process automation, and flexibility. But SOA/Web services deployment is challenging. Learn how more than 200 companies plan to overcome adoption challenges in this recent InformationWeek research brief.

    Get Your News In A Flash—Literally
    Sign up for InformationWeek NewsFlashes, automated e-mails alerting you to stories on the topics you choose. Just tell us the topics and the frequency—real time, daily, or weekly—and we'll start sending your e-mails.

    -----------------------------------------


    4. Grab Bag

    Protect Yourself From Pretexting (Wired News)
    Do you sit on the board of a Silicon Valley giant? Are you a journalist with high-placed sources to protect? Here's your survival guide for the dawning era of corporate plumbers and counter-journalism espionage.

    Silicon Valley's Golden Past Tarnished By Latest Probes (Washington Post)
    The SEC is focusing anew on the technology sector and the common practice of backdating stock options.

    Philanthropy Google's Way (New York Times - Reg. Required)
    Unlike most charities, Google's new philanthropy will be for-profit, a move that could greatly increase its range and flexibility.


    5. In Depth: Reviews And Personal Tech

    6 Tips To Protect Online Search Privacy
    Concerns over privacy and the use of online search are at an all-time high. Here's how to create a strong shield for privacy.

    Review: Iomega's Rev 70 Gbyte Drive Might Make Tape Obsolete
    Iomega's removable Rev drive is too expensive for home use, but could be a great alternative to tape backup systems.

    High Definition Throws Wrench In TiVo-To-Go
    Because of copyright restrictions, high-definition content can be played on a monitor or a TV, but it can't be put onto a mobile device.

    Sony Goes For Fashion Statement With New Notebooks
    The Vaio N Series laptops are available in coffee-color brown, white, and black and carry smooth lines and a "simple sense of style," the vendor says.

    MapQuest Driving Directions Find Voice
    MapQuest Navigator provides audible turn-by-turn voice directions from the phone handset using GPS. Users download a Java application to the phone and type in the destination.

    Google Adds Multimedia Content To Earth
    Google Earth now offers on Google multimedia content from the Discovery Network and others.


    6. Voice Of Authority

    A New Path To SOA: Follow The Customer Data
    If you get enough smart people in a room, one thing becomes clear: There's a simpler way to SOA.


    7. White Papers

    Lessons Learned: Top Reasons For PCI Audit Failure
    Although the drive to protect credit card data is vital, many companies have yet to implement the technologies and processes needed to address the PCI Data Security Standard's specific requirements. Find out how to achieve PCI compliance and, more importantly, avoid compromise.


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