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9/16/2013
10:39 AM
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10 Ways Government Clouds Have Changed This Year

Learn how 2013's cloud predictions are quickly unfolding for government CIOs.

9. Innovation and entrepreneurship will hit overdrive.

Entrepreneurship will go into overdrive, especially as full-featured, "idea-to-revenue" platforms take developers from concept, to development, to deployment and sales. Platforms like NJVC's Cloudcuity AppDeployer and others will facilitate a new wave of innovation, entrepreneurship and disruptive startups that will make things interesting for system integrators. We've already seen an incredible wave of high-tech innovation, and the emergence of flourishing incubators and accelerators. Cloud platforms, for the first time, provide these innovators with all the tools they need to succeed, without requiring a multi-million dollar investment.

Update: Cloud computing is revolutionizing virtually every business model. Drastic reductions in the cost of IT will help the government effectively deal with ever-increasing fiscal pressures. It also will give the government the ability to deliver more valuable services to constituents.

10. Cloud adoption will move from an option to a "must have."

The adoption of cloud computing will move away from something buyers purchase with surplus budget money to a "must have" service that replaces the traditional enterprise IT business model. Until recently, managers have viewed cloud computing as a proof-of-concept project or something that can be done or piloted with extra budget money. The reality is the cloud's value can only be fully realized when traditional and more costly ways of storing, using and securing data are replaced with new business models that take advantage of fast-and-lean cloud services. In the coming year, companies will accomplish this by halting old projects, rethinking old contracts, and shifting funds to affordable and innovative cloud services that can transform the IT enterprise.

Update: Cloud computing is a rapidly expanding, multi-billion-dollar business. Amazon's ability to challenge IBM for a $600 million federal cloud project signals this new era. Smaller and more nimble cloud-based services providers will spur competition and enable agency transformation.

Learn more about the evolution of the cloud by attending the Interop conference track on Cloud Computing and Virtualization in New York from Sept. 30 to Oct. 4.

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ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
9/18/2013 | 2:06:42 AM
re: 10 Ways Government Clouds Have Changed This Year
I don't have data on it, but I haven't seen & heard a lot of healthcare IT activity in PaaS -- or even the more basic IaaS. Even if secure exchange gets stronger, I suspect healthcare to move more slowly than other indsutries to cloud platforms. Might not move til there are healthcare-centric cloud infrastructure.

UPMC CIO recently talked about the coming need for it due to huge data growth (genomics, images, e-records). Here's a link: http://www.informationweek.com...
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
9/18/2013 | 12:38:43 AM
re: 10 Ways Government Clouds Have Changed This Year
Point 5: I don't think it was ever the goal, exactly, of cloud proponents to reduce the number of data centers. Granted, it was a goal of federal IT managers to reduce the total number of federal data centers. But look at the growth in smart phone use -- where do people think all those apps are running? On their phones? No, they're in a cloud data center, and lots of data centers have been needed to power those apps, On the other hand, moving bits around is more efficient than people searching store to store for the item they want, or finding the next coffee bar they visit.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
9/17/2013 | 7:18:22 PM
re: 10 Ways Government Clouds Have Changed This Year
There are many good points in this article. On the emergence of cloud brokers, it would seem there will two types: One type will focus on supply and demand needs and perform a pricing and arbitrage role. The other is a more technical broker, who performs the technical work to move data into and out different clouds. Do you see that distinction becoming more pronounced, or more blurred?
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
9/17/2013 | 5:02:22 PM
re: 10 Ways Government Clouds Have Changed This Year
Kevin, I agree with your emphasis on point 3. Do you see any early leaders for govt IT community among providers in this space?
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