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8/29/2014
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Microsoft Enhances OneDrive Mobile Apps

As the cloud storage wars rage on, Microsoft looks to make OneDrive and OneDrive for Business more cohesive, starting on Android.

Windows 8.1: 8 Things I Hate About You
Windows 8.1: 8 Things I Hate About You
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Microsoft announced several enhancements to its mobile OneDrive apps this week, including an update to the Android version that allows users to access both consumer and business accounts. The Android app is the first of Microsoft's OneDrive editions that includes this feature.

Since earlier this year, CEO Satya Nadella has been shaping Microsoft into a cross-platform company, with core software and services available to users of all major OSes. Thanks to BYOD, more people are using both personal and work devices -- and often more than one OS -- to get things done. Nadella's tactics play into this trend, but they also impose new challenges on Microsoft workers. To serve BYOD demands effectively, Microsoft services have to translate gracefully across devices. That means that, when one version of an app is updated with a new feature, the other versions often need to follow.

In that vein, Microsoft confirmed that other versions of OneDrive will soon gain the ability to access both personal and work accounts. "This is the first example of how we're creating a single, unified OneDrive experience," OneDrive group program manager Jason Moore said in a blog post. "We're looking to bring these features to iOS and Windows Phone devices in coming months."

[Need help choosing online storage? Read Cloud Storage: How To Pick A Provider.]

Though the updated Android app allows users to access both OneDrive for Business and the consumer version of OneDrive, the services remain separate. The former still requires that businesses sign up for some kind of subscription, whereas the latter is available both as a free service, with 15 GB of cloud storage, and as part of Office 365, with 1 TB of storage.

When an Android user adds a OneDrive for Business account to the app, both the personal and business data are accessible from the same interface, but files are still housed in separate areas. This should make it easier to avoid accidentally posting a business doc to your public storage folder or inadvertently sharing a personal photo with everyone at the office. The Android version of OneDrive also gained support for security PINs, improvements to camera backup speed, and the ability to open files from OneDrive in other apps.

OneDrive for Android users can now access both personal and business accounts.
OneDrive for Android users can now access both personal and business accounts.

Nadella announced his cross-platform goals in March, when he introduced Office for iPad. Since then, Microsoft has often seemed to prioritize iOS products. The company still hasn't released a full Office suite optimized for Android tablets, for instance, though one is expected soon. Microsoft also has yet to release a touch-first version of Office for Windows tablets. That product will reportedly arrive in the first half of 2015.

Microsoft evidently chose to merge Android's OneDrive and OneDrive for Business accounts before doing so with iOS because the Android version was further behind. "As we didn't have a native [OneDrive for Business] experience on Android, it was selected as the first app to provide the unified experience between personal and work files," a Microsoft rep confirmed to PCWorld. On iOS, OneDrive and OneDrive for Business are currently offered as two separate apps, neither of which can access information stored in the other.

Though iOS won't get the unified UI until later, Microsoft did roll out one new update for people using OneDrive on iPhones and iPads: native search. Users can now swipe down from the top of the screen to reveal a search field. The iOS app also gained the "all photos" view from the web version of OneDrive. This view displays all photos from across the user's OneDrive account, organized chronologically.

Not to be forgotten, Windows Phone 8.1 received an update, too. Users can now access the OneDrive recycling bin from within the app, which should make it easier to recover accidentally deleted files.

Microsoft is making progress with OneDrive, but it will have to keep up the pace to continue competing in the crowded cloud storage market. In June, Microsoft increased free OneDrive storage to 15 GB and subscription storage to 1 TB. Since then, Google and Box have begun offering unlimited storage. Dropbox also recently introduced a plan that offers 1 TB for $10 per month. As competition tightens, it's likely that plans that offer unlimited capacity will become the norm, putting more pressure on companies to continue differentiating through security, collaboration, and other features.

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Michael Endler joined InformationWeek as an associate editor in 2012. He previously worked in talent representation in the entertainment industry, as a freelance copywriter and photojournalist, and as a teacher. Michael earned a BA in English from Stanford University in 2005 ... View Full Bio

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mejiac
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mejiac,
User Rank: Ninja
9/2/2014 | 3:53:00 PM
Re: Still missing something that one more thing
@yalanand,

Agreed, but I guess that marketing/business strategy can be challenged,

If the smartphone market is dominated by Android and iOS, with Microsoft being a far third, would you want to have consumers try out your apps, so that when the day comes that they want to consider a phone upgrade, that process will be seamless (vs having to compromise)?

What does the community think?
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
9/1/2014 | 11:07:16 AM
Re: cross platform
Yes I fully agree - for app, the vendor needs to make it really application level stuff instead of being sticky to certain platform. Furthermore, it should provide the consistent behavior/functionality across different platforms.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 11:57:29 PM
Re: cross platform
If Google does not work on providing cross platform app they will learn the lesson in the near future.

@shakeeb, I agree with you. I think Google should seriously think about providing cross platform app else it might bring down the popularity of such apps.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 11:54:41 PM
Re: Still missing something that one more thing
I think the reason why MS might not have Google Drive as part of its app store is because they want to promote One Drive and they want it to become widespread. 

@tzubair, I totally agree with your opinion. I dont think MS would want to promote Google drive products when they have their own products which are competing against Google.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
8/31/2014 | 11:49:11 PM
Re: cross platform
I wonder if Google wants to fall on the same trap that Microsoft did few year back. If Google does not work on providing cross platform app they will learn the lesson in the near future.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
8/31/2014 | 11:46:43 PM
Re: cross platform
@tzubair- Do you mean to say Microsoft has learned it lesson from the past?

 
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
8/31/2014 | 11:45:12 PM
Re: Still missing something that one more thing
@tzubair- Yes but why is Google not trying to promote their Google Drive on Microsoft devices? 
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
8/31/2014 | 11:43:27 PM
Re: Still missing something that one more thing
@stotheco – Yes Google seem to have been withdrawing some of their apps from other OS. Sometime back Google withdrew Google Maps from Blackberry. I think many users have already felt this. 
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
8/31/2014 | 11:40:52 PM
Re: Competition
@H@mmy – yes very soon we will see a price drop as a result of completion. At least you will get more space for what you pay. 
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
8/31/2014 | 11:39:20 PM
Re: Still missing something that one more thing
@mejiac – It's always good to have the apps your used to whenever you get a new device, but seems it doesn't happen always. 
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Google in the Enterprise Survey
Google in the Enterprise Survey
There's no doubt Google has made headway into businesses: Just 28 percent discourage or ban use of its productivity ­products, and 69 percent cite Google Apps' good or excellent ­mobility. But progress could still stall: 59 percent of nonusers ­distrust the security of Google's cloud. Its data privacy is an open question, and 37 percent worry about integration.
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