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11/21/2013
01:06 PM
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Nirvanix Shutdown: A Post-Mortem

The cloud storage provider Nirvanix's demise, a little over a month ago, was a non-event despite initial panic. Why? No data loss.

(Source: Cryhavok.org)
(Source: Cryhavok.org)

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Shepy
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Shepy,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2013 | 7:31:45 AM
and the drive
"A more cost-effective option would be for cloud providers to consider tape as a backup. Imagine if Nirvanix had a copy of all its data on tape -- it could have just shipped everyone their data."

And hopefully have a bunch of tape drives to loan out too, as i imagine a lot of customers trashed theirs when they went cloud!
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
11/23/2013 | 7:05:17 PM
Re: The cloud grew up around Nirvanix. Good thing.
You raise exactly the right point here.  The best thing about cloud infrastructure is that it is very fluid, it can be quickly adapted to meet new traffic patterns or requirements.  Because it wasn't a closed cloud system, it allowed for other vendors to plug in and offer relocation services so that customers weren't more than mildly inconvenienced with the closure of Nirvanix.  This is a great sign, since some of the biggest fears of cloud adoption revolve around data loss due to vendor lock-in.  By showing that this is less of an issue thanks to new cloud models, it will hopefully start to convince more organizations to start adopting more cloud services.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
11/21/2013 | 4:19:04 PM
The cloud grew up around Nirvanix. Good thing.
I like the way George points out, "the industry responded quickly," for a variety of reasons. Narvanix doesn't operate its own cloud storage centers but was located in places like CoreSite and in or near Equinix data centers. Nirvanix communication ports to the outside world were limited in number and bandwidth, but HP, Rackspace, CoreSite and IBM with its data management knowhow weighed in and established new connections over private lines rather than depending on Narvanix limited access via the Internet. A DirectConnect line through Equinix or CoreSite to Amazon can move huge volumes of data and guarantee its privacy. As Narvanix infrastructure sagged, the strength of third party, cloud-based systems around it were brought into play. When Nirvanix started, there was no DirectConnect.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
11/21/2013 | 1:48:56 PM
Traffic Jam?
So the traffic jam that was expected as data flowed out of the Nirvanix pipes never materialized? How did the providers get around it?
Google in the Enterprise Survey
Google in the Enterprise Survey
There's no doubt Google has made headway into businesses: Just 28 percent discourage or ban use of its productivity ­products, and 69 percent cite Google Apps' good or excellent ­mobility. But progress could still stall: 59 percent of nonusers ­distrust the security of Google's cloud. Its data privacy is an open question, and 37 percent worry about integration.
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