Microsoft's Cortana Analytics Looks To Simplify Big Data - InformationWeek
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7/14/2015
02:05 PM
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb
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Microsoft's Cortana Analytics Looks To Simplify Big Data

Microsoft is planning to release a new suite of tools dubbed Cortana Analytics, which Satya Nadella claims will democratize big data.

7 Common Biases That Skew Big Data Results
7 Common Biases That Skew Big Data Results
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Microsoft continued its string of strategic announcements at its Worldwide Partners Conference in Orlando, Fla., this week with fresh details about the upcoming Cortana Analytics Suite (CAS), which company executives promised to deliver this fall.

Fusing a number of technologies and tools, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said that the new analytics suite would "democratize big data."

This was more than a product announcement. It was a glimpse into the roadmap that Microsoft is using to reinvent itself and become relevant once more to enterprise computing.

Azure-backed CAS works with both the structured data found in databases and the unstructured data of Internet of Things situations and log files. The Power BI tools that Microsoft has previously detailed for dashboard and visualizations have been fused with the predictive Microsoft machine learning (ML) software, as well as the Cortana voice interface that will be present in Windows 10.

Other Microsoft tools such as Azure Stream Analytics and Azure Data Lake will interface and interact with CAS.

(Image: D3Damon/iStockphoto)

(Image: D3Damon/iStockphoto)

CAS is truly a suite of tools, not just one tool writ large for the cloud. In many ways it resembles the approach that IBM is taking with Watson Analytics. Each of the individual components will be available as standalone product if the entire CAS sausage is not required.

App access to the underlying features of CAS is possible with the APIs that Microsoft has developed. These include a customer churn API, recommendations API for catalogs, and text analysis for English. There are also compute-intensive APIs like Face for recognition of facial features, speech APIs to allow speech-driven actions, and vision APIs for image recognition. These kinds of APIs enable user interaction to occur in other modalities than typing on a keyboard.

These APIs seem to be an outgrowth of Microsoft's Project Oxford on APIs.

[Read about Microsoft's Power BI update.]

Microsoft's collaboration suite (Project GigJam), which is still under development, will also use CAS as a backend processor. GigJam tries to avoid using specific apps for specific processes by creating an integrated workflow.

Built by Microsoft's Ambient Computing Group, which reports directly to Nadella, GigJam has been under development for the last two years. Nadella worked on it before becoming CEO.

Julia White, general manager of product marketing for Microsoft Office, told InformationWeek about the thinking behind GigJam.

"Exceptions constantly happen, and business processes aren't designed for it," she said. "When the exception steps outside the business process, it's all human [interaction]." CAS will allow easier human interaction for GigJam.

Pricing and licensing information for CAS was not available as of July 13 announcement. It remains to be seen if Microsoft will encourage adoption of CAS with aggressive pricing.

Associate Editor Kelly Sheridan contributed reporting from Microsoft's Worldwide Partners Conference in Orlando.

Larry Loeb has written for many of the last century's major "dead tree" computer magazines, having been, among other things, a consulting editor for BYTE magazine and senior editor for the launch of WebWeek. He has written a book on the Secure Electronic Transaction Internet ... View Full Bio
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larryloeb
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larryloeb,
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7/28/2015 | 3:10:19 PM
Re: Getting involved
Indeed, the promise of Big Data is just a promise unless we have a tool that makes it useful. 

Cortana analytics may be the first instatiation of such a tool.
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2015 | 1:02:26 PM
Getting involved
It's good to see MS getting involved in making Big Data usable. There is only so much you can do with a mountain of data without another program to make it simple to look at. Our first step was to gather as much data as we could. Now that we have it we need to find a way through it to make it useful.
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
7/15/2015 | 10:06:57 AM
Re: Help with Big Data
Letting the enterprise create those user-facing tools is just what Microsoft hopes for.

It's the enterprise they are after here, not the user.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
7/15/2015 | 9:55:17 AM
Re: Help with Big Data
Big data need big giants like MS. I agree that some of the tools provided by MS are not directly user-facing but they are essential for creating easy-to-use end-user applications.
larryloeb
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larryloeb,
User Rank: Author
7/14/2015 | 3:53:45 PM
Re: Help with Big Data
No one but Microsoft (so far) has these kinds of tools out there.

They are not directly user-facing, but will allow the creation of user-facing things that can use Big Data for the first time. And that is significant.
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
7/14/2015 | 2:34:28 PM
Help with Big Data
It's nice to see large investments in helping create a simplified platform for users to interact with Big Data.  I think the promise of all the insights that Big Data expects to help provide will definitely need some form of commercial platform for make it more accessible to smaller niche customers who don't necessarily have the infrastructure or team to support Big Data analytics, so I sincerely hope that having a platform like Cortana analytics makes it more acessible to other industries who can gain huge insight from the types of data that we anticipate will be collectable in the future through the Internet of Things and social media platforms.
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