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3/6/2014
09:48 AM
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Cloud Crossroads: Which Way PaaS?

As allies and competitors line up behind the new Cloud Foundry Foundation, where does that leave Red Hat and its support of OpenStack and Project Solum?

(Image credit: Wikipedia Commons.)
(Image credit: Wikipedia Commons.)

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Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
3/7/2014 | 3:13:18 PM
Does Joshua only pay north of the border?
Brent at ActiveState, not sure why you played the Canadian card. Joshua McKenty is a pretty ranking member here in the Silicon Valley, as well as a Canadian. Do you mean he'll only pays up north of the border? That'll cost him. Isn't the Loonie still worth more than U.S. dollar?
mthiele1001
IW Pick
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mthiele1001,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/7/2014 | 2:12:55 PM
How will this "PaaS' tragedy play out is anyone's guess
I really liked Charles' take on the current news relative to Openshift, CloudFoundry and Solum. I'm not sure where I can find fault with any of the arguments he made, but I do think the story and some of the associated comments miss the bigger point about PaaS and it's associated opportunity. Of course if this debate is really just about Solum and Openshift and whether or not they can succeed considering recent industry "re-alignments" that's anyone's guess. Certainly I would have given RedHat's package of offerings more strength if they had maintained a broader and deeper set of contributers. 

The "missed" bigger point in my mind is the gap that many of the current PaaS solutions have relative to being a true "generic" install layer for all applications. There are limitations in all of the current PaaS platforms relative to their ability to absorb any application with any set of tools. The one group that seems to have made the most headway in removing adoption risk (read lock in to specific design architecture for installation of applications) is ActiveState. I'll be the first to admit that I haven't installed and personally tested their solution in an enterprise environment, but if their story is correct, I believe they are taking the right path. 

I strongly believe that we are still all too often considering the adoption of new solutions (I.e., PaaS) as if they are an all or nothing play. We also tend to forget that the dominate adoption opportunities are in several distinct verticals (large SPs/Webscale environments and large enterprise) each of these verticals will have drastically different requirements and adoption models. We may in fact find that complex enterprise environments (shudder to think) might end up with multiple PaaS solutions that are each suited to specific design characteristics in their environment. Of course Bart Copeland might successfully argue/demonstrate that the ActiveState solution can solve the majority of needs. 
brentsmi
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brentsmi,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/7/2014 | 12:34:40 PM
Re: To ActiveState Brent: that's not much of an endorsement
I don't think you'd need to declare it here in Canada...
krishsubramanian
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krishsubramanian,
User Rank: Strategist
3/7/2014 | 12:19:29 PM
Re: $10 that Joshua McKenty could lose
I am betting $100 that Red Hat *need not* join the CF Foundation. I am not saying this as a Red Hat employee but as an industry observer and as someone who has been advocating PaaS for the past several years (including Cloud Foundry in the past). Most of the pundits are missing the point. The OSS Foundation is about doing open source right. It is especially critical if proprietary vendors are involved in the process. OpenStack is a good example of this and Cloud Foundry is another example. Foundation talks only about the community contribution of source code and the rights and responsibilities associated with it. It has NO IMPACT on the industry adoption of technology. If that is the case, OpenStack and CloudStack should have decimated Amazon, Microsoft, Google and VMware. Conflating the community aspect with industry marketshare is plain marketing by the vendors involved. I am going to do an article talking about this. Expect one by early next week.  
Charlie Babcock
IW Pick
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
3/6/2014 | 8:57:01 PM
IBM SoftLayer CEO Lance Crosby comments
I asked Lance Crosby, CEO of IBM SoftLayer, in an interview the day before this piece appeared why IBM would fund Cloud Foundry over OpenStack Solum/ Red Hat OpenShift. He said: "OpenStack to us is a little below that (PaaS) layer. It's a framework where you bring in the platform that you want, like Cloud Foundry. If it (OpenStack) gets muddy too early, it will be hard for it to be everything to everybody."
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
3/6/2014 | 8:32:48 PM
To ActiveState Brent: that's not much of an endorsement
Ah, gee, Brent Smithurst, that's not much of an endorsement of Red Hat's OpenShift. I guess I'm going to have to accept Joshua's bet myself. Will I have to declare that $10 as income?
brentsmi
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brentsmi,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/6/2014 | 6:53:13 PM
Re: $10 that Joshua McKenty could lose
I'll take that bet, Charles. Not that I think OpenShift has a bright future on its own, but because I think it will take them longer than 10 months to figure it out.

By the way, your comment, "There are now powerful vendors who might like to develop Cloud Foundry products that generate revenue, but so far the only one successfully doing so is Pivotal," is incorrect. ActiveState has been selling Stackato (based on Cloud Foundry and Docker) commercially for over two years and we are having great success with it.

Regardless of the above, I enjoyed your article!
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
3/6/2014 | 12:45:37 PM
$10 that Joshua McKenty could lose
Piston's Joshua McKenty wants to bet $10 Red Hat will join the Cloud Foundry project by the end of 2014. Anyone want to take that bet? I think it's $10 that he could lose.
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