Cloud // Software as a Service
Commentary
2/7/2014
09:06 AM
Doug Henschen
Doug Henschen
Commentary
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

4 Ways Salesforce.com Likes Facebook

Salesforce.com has learned a lot of lessons from the social network, and it shows in its enterprise applications.

Facebook is celebrating its 10th anniversary this week, and the milestone put Saleforce.com in the mood to comment on the social network's impact on enterprise software.

It was five years ago that Saleforce.com CEO Marc Benioff told top managers that he wanted all of them to get on Facebook because, he said, "this is the direction we need to go with the software we bring to our customers," recounts Peter Coffee, one of the executives who attended the meeting.

That directive soon led to a public "Facebook Imperative" blog by Benioff and was followed later in 2010 by the introduction of Salesforce Chatter, the collaborative social feed and micro-blogging tool since exposed pervasively throughout the vendor's applications and platform.

You could say, "and the rest is history," but that wouldn't really capture the extent to which Salesforce.com has embraced the Facebook way, according to Coffee, VP of strategic research and Marc Benioff's usual warmup act at events ranging from Dreamforce to Cloudforce to this year's Salesforce1 World Tour. After all, what enterprise software vendor hasn't since added Facebook-feed-style interfaces to its applications?

[ Maybe Salesforce.com doesn't want to follow in these footsteps: Read "10 Famous Facebook Flops." ]

"We didn't merely create a medium for personal conversation and laminate that on top of the enterprise software suite," says Coffee in a phone interview with InformationWeek. "The fabric of that collaboration was woven in from the very bottom of the platform, so we're able to make it scalable and we're able to have entities like processes or accounts or external events in ERP or financial systems manifest as an update in a Facebook-like environment," says Coffee.

Point taken, but many other vendors -- whether it's Infor with its Ming.le application or Oracle and SAP with their more recently added collaborative layers -- also let you subscribe to events, accounts, suppliers, and processes as well as people.

A second way in which Salesforce.com stands out, says Coffee, is that it is "turning the siloes inside out," so it's not treating them like three different entities when they're talking to sales, marketing, and service.

"Because of our multi-tenant architecture we're able to do a degree of unification of the view of the customer not only inside the company, but bringing in the customer's behavior -- when the customer chooses to behave in public -- on social networks like Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook," Coffee says.

This is certainly much harder to do (and it potentially touches on the third rail called privacy concerns), but to accomplish that Salesforce.com acquired Radian6, which many of its customers are using as a platform for social-monitoring and engagement applications.

"We think it's really important to respond to people in the channel in which they approach you because that's the channel of communication they apparently prefer [as opposed to, say, the corporate call center] and, two, because your active response is now on the same stage, so their followers are aware of your response."

Here, too, Salesforce.com isn't totally unique, technically, as Oracle and SAP have social monitoring and sentiment-analysis capabilities as well as social tools. But we do hear many more real-world examples of Salesforce.com's social tools actually in use -- whether at American Red Cross, Citi, Dell, or Toyota.

Peter Coffee, Salesforce.com VP of strategic research.
Peter Coffee, Salesforce.com VP of strategic research.

The third way in which Salesforce.com is following Facebook's lead -- and it's important and unique to Salesforce.com -- is in presenting itself as a platform rather than a cloud-based application suite. Just as Facebook encouraged other content, application, and experience creators to deliver their ideas within Facebook and extend that environment, Salesforce.com has done the same with its AppExchange and Force.com platform.

"The community started small, but it builds and builds on itself to the point where now, almost every one of our major customers uses the phrase 'Salesforce is our platform' spontaneously in conversations," says Coffee. "Five years ago or even three years ago, that was not the case."

There are hints of this sort of approach with what SAP is doing with what it now calls "The Hana Cloud Platform," but it's far from realizing the sort of network effect that Salesforce.com has seen with Force.com.

In the fourth and most-recent way in which Salesforce.com is following Facebook's footsteps, Coffee says the current Salesforce1 push is not unlike Facebook's emphasis over the last year on improving mobile capabilities.  

"We've redoubled our efforts on mobile to the point where I can now say that our mobile clients evolve three to 10 times faster than do our desktop clients," says Coffee. "That's crucial in an environment in which people treat their mobile as their primary tool for running their lives and getting work done."

Too many companies treat digital and mobile strategies as pet projects. Here are four ideas to shake up your company. Also in the Digital Disruption issue of InformationWeek: Six enduring truths about selecting enterprise software. (Free registration required.)

Doug Henschen is Executive Editor of InformationWeek, where he covers the intersection of enterprise applications with information management, business intelligence, big data and analytics. He previously served as editor in chief of Intelligent Enterprise, editor in chief of ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
2/8/2014 | 3:20:20 AM
Re: You can Chatter outside your company
I think it would be more like Linked-in vs. Facebook, in the former it is mostly the user's responsibility to find groups of interest that are active and on point, in the later the administration has a bit more responsibility to keep the grouping on track -- creating a trade-off between quality content and mass viewership.
Brian.Dean
50%
50%
Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
2/8/2014 | 3:08:43 AM
Re: Ellison gives Salesforce.com Credit
Chatter is a wonderful addition to any firm, it can increase productivity. Even small talk has the potential to turn into something that delivers value, for instance, if one employee is just mentioning how great the level of fuel economy is of their new hybrid car to another employee who happens to be in accounts and knows that fuel expenditure is a major cost to the company, it could prompt him/her to carry out an hypothetical appraisal.

I think collaborative tools have a greater chance to become a living and growing tool if like Google's and Microsoft's CEOs mentioned: customer and enterprise tools should not be considered separate. 
Ariella
50%
50%
Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
2/7/2014 | 4:25:43 PM
Re: You can Chatter outside your company
Thanks @D. Henschen.
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
2/7/2014 | 3:06:00 PM
Re: You can Chatter outside your company
As I understand it, you would have to be invited to join a group, and it's up to the group owner to grant access -- much as an internal user can't just check out chats within groups they're not  a part of.
Ariella
50%
50%
Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
2/7/2014 | 2:55:28 PM
Re: You can Chatter outside your company
@D.Henschen Are the specific groups a means of control for limited access? Or once you're in, you'd be able to navigate around to anything?
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
2/7/2014 | 1:33:26 PM
Re: You can Chatter outside your company
In theory, but I'll bet most companies require anyone requesting access for a supplier to first sign over rights to their first-born child and then take a polygraph while strapped into an interrogation setup straight from Homeland.
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
2/7/2014 | 1:03:36 PM
Re: You can Chatter outside your company
Salesforce does offer ways to extend your Chattersphere outside your company, so, for example, you can collaborate with customers and suppliers. Companies have to verify that external email addresses can join specific groups.
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
2/7/2014 | 12:32:18 PM
Closed gardens
What SAP. Oracle, etc. seem to be missing about the Facebook model is that it's not a closed garden in that I can communicate freely with all sorts of people outside my company. The only "enterprise" tool that offers that now is email, which is why we still all panic if mail goes down.

Talk to me when I can chatter with people other than coworkers.
D. Henschen
50%
50%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
2/7/2014 | 10:11:12 AM
Ellison gives Salesforce.com Credit
In a keynote speech on HCM on Thursday, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison credited Salesforce.com as "the only other cloud applications provider that is a big enthusiast about integrating social networks with applications -- they have this thing called Chatter." Ellison was, of course, saying that Oracle is the other vendor that has embraced this approach, but plenty of cloud vendors have social-style interfaces embedded in their applications. The question is, to what degree is that functionality really entertwined with the user idendities, user profiles and an active active collaboration such that it's a living, breathing enviornment that people are actually using?


I know people who are non-salesperson employees at companies that use Salesforce Chatter, and they comment that it's mostly used by salespeople for, well, idle chatter and occassionally meaningful exchanges.
8 Steps to Modern Service Management
8 Steps to Modern Service Management
ITSM as we know it is dead. SaaS helped kill it, and CIOs should be thankful. Hereís what comes next.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest Septermber 14, 2014
It doesn't matter whether your e-commerce D-Day is Black Friday, tax day, or some random Thursday when a post goes viral. Your websites need to be ready.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.