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5/26/2006
03:35 PM
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Criminal Conduct

We should have zero tolerance toward anyone making unauthorized attempts to access our networks ("To Catch A Hacker," May 15). An unauthorized port scan can be compared to a stranger going up to your house in the middle of the night and checking to see if your windows are locked. If the stranger is successful in gaining access, he's not an activist, he's a criminal.

Bradley G. Ouimette
Security Network Engineer
Centerville, Mass.

Undesirable Destination

I came to the United States five years ago under an H-1B visa ("Job No. 1 For The U.S.: Build A Tech Workforce," May 8, p. 68; informationweek.com/1088/preston.htm). While I've been here working full time, I went after the top certifications in the industry, and I finished a master's degree. My salary is only expected to go up, and the future should look OK, however, ... H-1B workers are subject to a ridiculously long process to gain resident rights. Meanwhile, their spouses aren't allowed to work or study.

My wife and I could move to a country with lower per capita income and make more money. And we will.

Those of us who are the most brilliant can choose any place in the world. And the choice is not the United States anymore.

Juan B. Gutierrez
Senior Programmer/Analyst
Information Systems of Florida

The Price Of Security

I appreciate a reasonable perspective on phone call monitoring ("Consider The Known Facts Before Skewering The Feds," May 22). I'm very worried about terrorist activity, and the only way to deter this activity is to use all available tools, including telephone monitoring. Though we citizens don't like to yield some of our privacy, at some point reasonable people will understand that extraordinary measures must be taken to deal with extraordinary crime.

Michael Pelletier
Purchasing Agent, Austin AECOM
Kalamazoo, Mich.

Humans Hold The Key

Technology is morally neutral ("Is Technology Evil, Or Just Naughty?" May 15). Most technical innovations are good, though some clearly fail to deliver the goods.

The question about who's in control is key. Humans control technology, and that's where moral uncertainty creeps in. The creation of knives was clearly a good advance even though some people subvert this good for their own evil intentions. Others simply suffer from accidental misuse.

David A.E. Wall
CEO, Yozons
Kirkland, Wash.

Correction

In "New Analysts On The Block," Burton Group's Inflection Point offers free podcasts to both clients and nonclients (May 22).

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