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Compare Your Salary With Peers; Vista vs. Linux On The Desktop

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Is The Tech Job Market Better? Our Data Says 'Yes'
2. Today's Top Story
    - Are You Making What You're Worth? Check Out Our Comparative Tool
    - The Average Tech Manager Makes $105,000, But Have Tech Jobs Bounced Back?
    - How-To IT Career Guide: 7 Critical Strategies, From Getting Started To Semiretiring
    - Salary Survey: Summary Findings
3. Last Week's Highlighted Coverage
    - Ubuntu Linux Vs. Windows Vista: The Battle For Your Desktop
    - Ubuntu Linux Vs. Windows Vista: What Do You Think?
    - Endpoint Security: 6 Questions To Ask Before You Buy
    - Results of Virginia Tech reader poll
4. Eye Candy: Featured Image Galleries
5. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
6. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"When the habitually even-tempered suddenly fly into a passion, that explosion is apt to be more impressive than the outburst of the most violent amongst us." -- Margery Allingham


1. Editor's Note: Is The Tech Job Market Better? Our Data Says 'Yes'

The 2007 InformationWeek Salary Survey suggests things have been looking up for the IT job market the past year. Not everyone's going to want to hear that. The tech job market is volatile and uneven, far from a lift-all-boats phenomenon. There's a huge gulf in pay between the highest- and lowest-paying job categories.

Our Salary Adviser tool lets you slice the data by job category and geography. A 20-chart gallery lets you form your own opinions of the data, such as comparing pay for dozens of staff and management job categories at a glance, or look at pay for men vs. women.

Here's some of the data that points to a stronger IT job market. Foremost is that median pay is moving up -- both base salaries and bonuses. The typical U.S. IT manager makes $105,000 in salary and cash bonuses, while the median staff compensation is $78,000. There have been several years over the past eight where median pay stagnated in our survey. Median pay has been on a compound annual growth rate of about 5% since 1999, but that's come in painful fits and starts.

There's plenty to worry about in the Salary Survey, just as in the larger tech market. Most troubling, median pay for those 25 and under declined from last year -- just as the industry frets over how to attract the best young minds. Once you've sifted the data and our coverage, please weigh in with your thoughts on the health of the IT job market.

Chris Murphy
cjmurphy@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story: IT Salaries

Are You Making What You're Worth? Check out our comparative tool

The Average Tech Manager Makes $105,000, But Have Tech Jobs Bounced Back?
There's a lot of good in our survey of 7,200 IT pros. But dark clouds swirl around entry-level wages, job growth, and outsourcing.

How-To IT Career Guide: 7 Critical Strategies, From Getting Started To Semiretiring
Driven by our Salary Survey data, a look at make-or-break moments in a career.

Salary Survey: Summary Findings


3. Last Week's Highlighted Coverage

Ubuntu Linux Vs. Windows Vista: The Battle For Your Desktop
Is Linux finally ready to take on Windows as a desktop OS? We tried out both Vista and Ubuntu on individual PCs to see which works better. Here's what our reviewer thinks.

Ubuntu Linux Vs. Windows Vista: What Do You Think?
Wander into any place where Linux enthusiasts hang out, and you'll find out that Windows systems are constantly crashing or crawling with a multitude of viruses while they're run by suit-wearing company drones whose thoughts are controlled by an evil corporate entity operating out of Redmond. Sit down with a roomful of dedicated Windows users, and you'll discover that Linux advocates are a bunch of wide-eyed screaming radicals living in their parents' basements who spend all their time writing blog entries fiercely defending applications that only a programmer could possibly comprehend. Recognize yourself there?

Endpoint Security: 6 Questions To Ask Before You Buy
Here's a road map, suggestions on price points, and a guide on what you need to assess before you purchase any endpoint security product for your enterprise.

Reader Poll Results: Should Network TV have broadcast the Virginia Tech killer's video?

No: 74%
Yes: 23%
Unsure: 3%
Total votes: 238


4. Eye Candy: Featured Image Galleries

Installing And Upgrading Windows Vista

Report From The LG National Texting Championship


5. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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