Feature
News
5/24/2002
07:54 AM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Costs Chill Chipmakers

Scientists have jumped a major hurdle for superconducting chips. The next move is up to chip vendors.

To eliminate painfully slow interchip communication, TRW Space and Electronics Group developed circuits made of niobium that can transmit up to 60 Gbps. But because superconducting chips must be cooled to liquid-helium temperatures, refrigeration costs would run $20,000 to $30,000 a chip, says Konstantin Likharev, a superconductor-electronics expert at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

If the refrigerators were produced in volume, though, those costs could drop to $1,000 or less, he says. "I don't know what chip manufacturers are thinking. I'm surprised no one has jumped on this."

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Government, May 2014
NIST's cyber-security framework gives critical-infrastructure operators a new tool to assess readiness. But will operators put this voluntary framework to work?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.