Other
Commentary
3/13/2006
09:52 AM
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Cyber Society

Listen to a podcast version of this newsletter


In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Cyber Society
2. Today's Top Story: Intel Developer Forum
    - Intel Math: 2+2=Quad-Core Processor
    - AMD Readies Counterattack For Second Half
    Related Stories:
    - Inside Intel's Core Architecture--What Makes It Better?
    - Wireless USB Vs. Cable-Free USB
    - Current Flash Technology Should Hold To 2010
    - Free E-Book: Complete Dual-Core Diary
3. Breaking News
    - Microsoft To Refresh Office 2007 Beta
    - Updated: Google Agrees To Pay $90 Million In Click Fraud Suit
    - Google Acquires Writely Online Word Processing Service
    - PIN Scandal 'Worst Hack Ever'; Citibank Only The Start
    - Microsoft Unfolds Origami, The 'On The Go' PC
    - AI-Based Accoona Search Engine Aims At Google
    - Vista Enterprise Meant To Spark Microsoft Licensing
    - DHL Taps Several Vendors For RFID Project
    - Tech Pros More 'Realistic' About Jobs In February, Survey Finds
    - Books From Blogs Vie For New Literary Prize
    - U Wisconsin Zaps Mac Hack Challenge
    - Search Engine Meeting Will Cater To Serious Seekers
4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web
    - More Is Better Serves As Theme For CeBIT (AP)
    - Apple: Finding The Root Of The Problem (BusinessWeek)
    - Why Data Mining Won't Stop Terror (Wired.com)
5. In Depth: Personal Tech & Reviews
    - Review: Apple's MacBook Pro With Intel Core Duo Chip
    - Windows Defender Anti-Spyware Beta 2: Better But Buggy
    - All About Microsoft Windows SharePoint
    - Review: OQO Model 01+ Windows XP Handheld
    - Siemens To Offer Yahoo VoIP In Cordless Phones
    - Samsung Follows Microsoft With Its Own 'Ultra-Mobile' PC
6. Voice Of Authority
    - But What About The One-Man Helicopters?
7. White Papers
    - Electronic Discovery Overview
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day: Spring (has sprung!)

"A little madness in the spring is wholesome even for the King." -- Emily Dickinson

"[Spring is] a true reconstructionist." -- Henry Timrod

"Winter is on my head, but eternal spring is in my heart." -- Victor Hugo


1. Editor's Note: Cyber Society

As I was picking through a stack of newspapers I was getting ready to recycle this past weekend, I kept seeing examples of how advances in high technology and its movement beyond the workplace are creating new opportunities for the good, the bad, and the ever rude. It's also starting to spur debate about appropriate applications of some of this technology, while also bringing to a head the issue of how best to deal with some of the fallout.

The kinds of questions that come to mind include: How can we use emerging mobile digital technology to improve how we get things done, or even to address social problems? What's the best way to enable people to use their technology without infringing on anyone else's rights or interfering with other activities? These questions keep popping up, and it's probably going to come down to what we're willing to trade off for convenience, and what we're willing to put up with.

For example, I saw a story not too long ago about wireless signals from consumer applications interfering with the use of technology at a local business. You can imagine that situation is only going to intensify.

Here's a sampling of other ways the digital sphere is weaving into the fabric of everyday life:

* Here's one for public safety: In Boston, authorities are urging judges to make electronic bracelets the accessory de rigueur for violent criminals put on probation. Of particular interest are the repeat offenders (which begs the question of whether these guys are the best candidates for probation, but I digress). Of course, forcing electronic bling on high-risk, registered sex offenders is already in practice in some areas, so it's not hard to see Boston's push going nationwide. And it's easier still to imagine that electronic bracelets could also be used to make sure defendants, and perhaps even reluctant witnesses, show up at trial.

* The modern-day Swiss Army knife isn't a knife, although that capability will probably be added soon. It's your cell phone. You already know its functions as a medium for pictures, video, Internet access, and multiple forms of communication. But here are some other emerging uses: as an alarm clock, a new form of musical expression, and a wallet, coming soon to a ring tone near you (for more specifics, go to my blog here).

* Hate to wait in grocery lines while the people ahead of you corral their kids, talk on cell phones, fidget with coupons, and rummage through their wallets and purses? Well, there may be less of that going forward, depending on where you shop. At the very least, you don't have to be one of those people. According to Fortune magazine, grocery and discount stores such as Wal-Mart and Costco are looking into letting customers pay by scanning their fingerprints. Such systems, already in use at Albertsons, Cub Foods, and Piggly Wiggly, will enable retailers to eliminate labor, speed up checkout, cut processing costs, and lower transaction processing fees. The issue of course is privacy. Do you want to leave your fingerprints or other biometric data on file with your favorite retailers? And can you trust them to keep that data secure?

The greater society seems to be coming down hard on beeping, peeping cell phones--they're being banned from gyms, restaurants, and schools, though oddly, you never read about movie theaters banning them. However, if you can't shut your phone off or leave it behind, not to worry. The latest trend seems to be the creation of cell phone-friendly areas. For example, a recent article about dining pet peeves in the Boston Globe quoted one restaurateur as saying a trial of the concept was so successful in its existing eateries that it will become a standard part of blueprints for future restaurants. Look for more restaurants and gyms to follow suit.

These are just a few examples where business technologies or advances and our personal or societal needs have meshed and, at times, clashed. There are many more examples, and you can read about them by going to my blog entry.

You can also help us take a bead on how the adoption of consumer technologies is impacting your company's IT strategies. How will your company support these technologies in the coming years? Share your opinions with the editors of InformationWeek by completing our brief and confidential survey on Evolving IT Priorities. Besides, in return for your response, you could win one of five Apple iPod Nanos valued at $199!

Patricia Keefe
pkeefe@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story: Intel Developer Forum

Intel Math: 2+2=Quad-Core Processor
Intel plans to offer a multichip package that combines two dual-core Xeon processors to create its first quad-core processor for servers.

AMD Readies Counterattack For Second Half
New processors for servers, desktops, and mobile computing will use DDR2 memory and embedded hardware-assisted virtualization.

Related Stories:

Current Flash Technology Should Hold To 2010
An Intel Corp. executive sees current flash memory technology sustaining until the end of the decade, pushing out the need for 'universal memory" until 2010.

Inside Intel's Core Architecture--What Makes It Better?
The introduction of Core is one of the most important technology developments for Intel in years and may determine its success for the rest of the decade and beyond.

Wireless USB Vs. Cable-Free USB
Intel promotes its WiMedia wireless media standard for personal area networks at its developer forum.

Free E-Book: Complete Dual-Core Diary
Upgrading your PC? Get the scoop on Intel and AMD's desktop and mobile processors for 2006 with "Dual-Core Diary: 2006 Desktop And Mobile Forecast."


3. Breaking News

Microsoft To Refresh Office 2007 Beta
The "technical refresh" will feature an updated build of the new GUI and bug fixes, according to Microsoft.

Updated: Google Agrees To Pay $90 Million In Click Fraud Suit
The settlement stems from a lawsuit filed by Lane's Gifts earlier this year in an Arkansas state court and is designed to settle all outstanding claims against Google for fraud committed using its pay-per-click ad system back to 2002.

Google Acquires Writely Online Word Processing Service
Writely allows users to store and work with text documents on the Web. Users can share selected documents with other Writely users of their choosing, enabling groups to collaboratively edit documents.

PIN Scandal 'Worst Hack Ever'; Citibank Only The Start
The scam has hit national banks like Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and Washington Mutual, as well as smaller banks, all of which have reissued debit cards in recent weeks, says a Gartner research VP.

Microsoft Unfolds Origami, The 'On The Go' PC
The software giant hopes the ultracompact computer, which runs Windows XP and sports a touch screen and wireless connectivity, will spawn an entirely new handheld market.

AI-Based Accoona Search Engine Aims At Google
Users can cross-reference search keywords to frequently used categories including time period and media outlet, and to a database of business functions.

Vista Enterprise Meant To Spark Microsoft Licensing
A Gartner analyst says the key feature that will likely drive most companies to adopt Windows Vista Enterprise, and thus an enterprise software agreement with Microsoft, will be the Multilanguage User Interface Language Pack. This will let companies create a single distribution image that includes all languages.

DHL Taps Several Vendors For RFID Project
The initial project will integrate RFID technology into the supply chain to improve repairs and returns. DHL wants to track valuable items, such as high-definition television sets bound for repair shops.

Tech Pros More 'Realistic' About Jobs In February, Survey Finds
Confidence about job growth and security continues to slip, even though a CIO survey finds they plan to increase tech hiring in Q2.

Books From Blogs Vie For New Literary Prize
The Blooker Prize, whose name gives a nod to the publishing industry's prestigious Booker Prize, puts a spotlight on the growing market of unknown writers finding a wider following for their everyday passions and observances. Contenders include an amateur chef and a London call girl.

U Wisconsin Zaps Mac Hack Challenge
UW-Madison yanks offline a challenge site that baited hackers to break into a Mac Mini. The machine apparently survived 38 hours before university administrators pulled the plug.

Search Engine Meeting Will Cater To Serious Seekers
In an uncharacteristic move, a conference habitually attended by underground but influential search specialists has invited a Google executive to deliver a keynote.

All Our Latest News

Watch The News Show

In the current episode:

John Soat With 'Big Numbers'

Eric Chabrow With 'Search Slowdown'

Lori Macvittie With 'How Many Vistas Do We Need?'

Jennifer Zaino With 'Gremlins'


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

It's All About Access
In the coming year, many companies plan to increase employee access to BI tools, according to a recently released InformationWeek Research report, Business Intelligence Tools.

Win An Apple iPod Nano!
How is the adoption of consumer technologies impacting your company's IT strategies? How will your company support these technologies in the coming years? Share your opinions with the editors of InformationWeek by completing our brief and confidential Evolving IT Priorities 2Q research. In return for your response, you'll be entered into a drawing for one of five Apple iPod Nanos valued at $199.

New Web Site! -- TECHSEARCH.COM
You can search more than 60 CMP technology sites, read blogs, and find the best tech content from across the World Wide Web--all in one place.

-----------------------------------------


4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web

More Is Better Serves As Theme For CeBIT (AP)
Whether it's a giant flat-panel TV screen, cell phone with enormous storage capacity, or tiny PC with full laptop functions, visitors to the CeBIT tech fair are hit with the message that bigger is better--even though it may come in a smaller package.

Apple: Finding The Root Of The Problem (BusinessWeek)
To maintain public confidence in its operating system, Jobs & Co. should consider hiring a security czar.

Why Data Mining Won't Stop Terror (Wired.com)
The U.S. government puts a lot of stock in the theory that computers programmed to sift through mountains of private consumer data can spot terrorists hidden in our midst. Too bad it can't work. Commentary by Bruce Schneier.


5. In Depth: Personal Tech & Reviews

Review: Apple's MacBook Pro With Intel Core Duo Chip
The MacBook Pro is clearly poised for the next generation of laptop use, with a faster architecture and more refined details than previously.

Windows Defender Anti-Spyware Beta 2: Better But Buggy
The new Beta 2 version of Microsoft's free Windows Defender anti-spyware software adds significant new features, but it's not yet glitch-free.

All About Microsoft Windows SharePoint
Windows SharePoint Services in Windows Server 2003 allows users to collaborate across the enterprise. Here's how to take advantage of it.

Review: OQO Model 01+ Windows XP Handheld
It's a fully functional Windows XP computer that fits in your pocket. The latest version is faster, with more memory and other under-the-covers improvements.

Siemens To Offer Yahoo VoIP In Cordless Phones
Consumers can make free PC-to-PC calls, as well as calls to landline phones and cellular phones, which carry a charge. In addition, users can access their Yahoo Messenger contact list.

Samsung Follows Microsoft With Its Own 'Ultra-Mobile' PC
Microsoft wasn't the only company to launch an ultracompact PC at the CeBIT show. Samsung Electronics said it will also be jumping into the mobile PC market with its Q1 ultramobile PC, which is based on a concept jointly designed by Samsung, Intel, and Microsoft.


6. Voice Of Authority

But What About The One-Man Helicopters?
Mitch Wagner thinks about the movie The Road Warrior whenever he passes through places where business users and students gather-coffee shops, airport gates, hotel lobbies, and trade show common areas. In The Road Warrior, Mel Gibson and groups of scruffy post-nuclear mutants fought for dwindling supplies of gasoline. Similarly, wherever people gather to use mobile computers, only the strongest survive by controlling access to a rare, life-giving resource: working electrical sockets.


7. White Papers

Electronic Discovery Overview
Electronic discovery is preserving, acquiring, culling, processing, reviewing, and producing electronically stored information at issue in legal and administrative actions. The intent of this white paper is to provide a high-level overview of electronic discovery.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

Try InformationWeek's RSS Feed

Discover all InformationWeek's sites and newsletters

Recommend This Newsletter To A Friend
Do you have friends or colleagues who might enjoy this newsletter? Please forward it to them and point out the subscription page.


9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

To unsubscribe from, subscribe to, or change your E-mail address for this newsletter, please visit the InformationWeek Subscription Center.

Note: To change your E-mail address, please subscribe your new address and unsubscribe your old one.

Keep Getting This Newsletter
Don't let future editions of InformationWeek Daily go missing. Take a moment to add the newsletter's address to your anti-spam white list:
InfoWeek@update.informationweek.com

If you're not sure how to do that, ask your administrator or ISP. Or check your anti-spam utility's documentation. Thanks.

We take your privacy very seriously. Please review our Privacy Policy.

InformationWeek Daily Newsletter
A free service of InformationWeek and the TechWeb Network.
Copyright (c) 2006 CMP Media LLC
600 Community Drive
Manhasset, N.Y. 11030

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - August 27, 2014
Who wins in cloud price wars? Short answer: not IT. Enterprises don't want bare-bones IaaS. Providers must focus on support, not undercutting rivals.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Howard Marks talks about steps to take in choosing the right cloud storage solutions for your IT problems
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.