Rio Olympics Has IT Managers Worried About Network Capacity - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Data Centers
News
8/5/2016
11:05 AM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Rio Olympics Has IT Managers Worried About Network Capacity

A survey sponsored by Riverbed and conducted by Wakefield Research finds corporate networks will be tested as the 2016 Summer Olympics get underway in Rio.

7 Cool Data Center Innovations
7 Cool Data Center Innovations
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

With the 2016 Summer Olympics starting today in Rio de Janeiro, many employers will be monitoring their corporate networks to see whether customers and internal users are being displaced by their employees' appetite to watch events.

Riverbed, the company that makes network and internet acceleration products, sponsored a survey on how IT professionals were coping with the potential for increased network strain and volatility as the Olympics get underway.

Atos SE, the supplier of Olympic video and data, including results, from the games, has made a special effort to make the Rio de Janeiro events accessible on many different types of devices, including mobile devices.

Nearly everyone has their favorite events to watch over the coming week, which poses the question: How should network managers anticipate what the effect of that will be?

Riverbed commissioned Wakefield Research, a professional survey firm, to find out and then presented the results in "The Riverbed Global Network Strain 2016 Snapshot Survey."

Wakefield obtained results from an online survey form from 102 IT professionals in the US, 100 IT professionals in the UK, 100 IT professionals in Australia, and 101 IT professionals in Brazil.

(Image: dolphinphoto/iStockphoto)

(Image: dolphinphoto/iStockphoto)

The main result was that 85% of those interviewed considered it likely that they would have to monitor their corporate nets for traffic impacts due to Olympics-viewing by employees. The survey depended on the terms "likely" and "very likely" for its main finding. Of the 85%, nearly half (42%) of the same group said they were "very likely" to need to monitor their networks, according to the report.

The managers expected employees to be using both the corporate wired and WiFi networks in their activity.

In addition, those surveyed reported that they saw most employees accessing Olympics data through their desktops and laptops (48%), followed by smartphones (34%), and finally by tablets or other mobile devices (18%).

The manager group surveyed in Brazil, where the games are being hosted, concluded that more employees would access events via smartphone (44%) than by any other means. It was the only country where smartphones lead all other devices, the report found.

[Want to see who is making Olympic events available for worldwide viewing? Read Rio Olympics Will Test Atos's IT Systems, Cloud Infrastructure.]

The same concern was found in an earlier survey by TEKsystems, which interviewed 600 IT managers and found that 72% expect "a major or moderate increase in internet usage at their companies due to workers streaming swimming, gymnastics and other competitions," according to the report.

Mike Sargent, senior vice president at Riverbed, urged firms to prepare for unexpected peaks as popular events occur. Employees who seek access to results, streaming online content, or web applications tied to the Olympics can cause "a significant increase in network traffic ... and a related increase in volatility of network demand," he said.

Charles Babcock is an editor-at-large for InformationWeek and author of Management Strategies for the Cloud Revolution, a McGraw-Hill book. He is the former editor-in-chief of Digital News, former software editor of Computerworld and former technology editor of Interactive ... View Full Bio

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
vnewman2
50%
50%
vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
8/15/2016 | 5:53:29 PM
Re: Zika not a concern
From a support perspective, it is a welcome respite from the deluge of calls we get every day as the minds of the staff are consumed with chasing gold medals (and probably some Pokemans too).
Charlie Babcock
50%
50%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
8/8/2016 | 6:43:43 PM
Zika not a concern
The Zika virus, surprisingly, is not a concern to some of the IT staffers in Rio. Shailesh Chauhan, technical and IT security manager for Olympic systems supplier, Atos, said he has not worried about mosquitoes or the virus during the four years that he'[s been in Rio, preparing for the current games.
Slideshows
What Digital Transformation Is (And Isn't)
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  12/4/2019
Commentary
Watch Out for New Barriers to Faster Software Development
Lisa Morgan, Freelance Writer,  12/3/2019
Commentary
If DevOps Is So Awesome, Why Is Your Initiative Failing?
Guest Commentary, Guest Commentary,  12/2/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
The Cloud Gets Ready for the 20's
This IT Trend Report explores how cloud computing is being shaped for the next phase in its maturation. It will help enterprise IT decision makers and business leaders understand some of the key trends reflected emerging cloud concepts and technologies, and in enterprise cloud usage patterns. Get it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll