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8/8/2005
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Dell Expands Dual-Core Server Portfolio

The computer maker introduces two new servers and is pushing forward with a dual-core server portfolio based on Intel's Pentium D processor.

While dual-core Xeon processors may not be available until next year, Dell is pushing forward with a dual-core server portfolio based on Intel's Pentium D processor. The computer maker on Monday introduced a second and third system based on the processor.

"We are extending dual-core environments throughout our product line," says Tim Golden, director of PowerEdge server marketing for Dell. "This is a trend you will see not just on these platforms but ultimately on our entire product line."

The PowerEdge 830 and 850 will offer new levels of value, he says, providing a nearly 80% performance boost in systems priced at less than $750. Dell in July introduced the PowerEdge SC430, its first systems to offer a dual-core Pentium D processor.

The PowerEdge 830 and 850 will be offered with the choice of three processors, a single core Celeron, a single-core Pentium 4, or the dual-core Pentium D.

The PowerEdge 830 is a single-socket tower server for workgroup, remote office, and small and midsize business customers, Golden says, and can provide up to 62% greater performance than the predecessor PowerEdge 800, based on a single-core processor.

The PowerEdge 850 is a single-socket rack-mount server designed for small business and cost-sensitive data-center customers. The systems provides up to 79% greater compute-intensive performance and up to 26% greater Web-serving performance than its predecessor, the PowerEdge 750.

Each system will be offered with the choice of a 2.53-GHz Celeron, 2.8- or 3.6-GHz Pentium 4, or 3.0- or 3.2-GHz Pentium D processor.

The PowerEdge 830 and 850 will be available in August with prices starting at $699 and $749, respectively.

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