Infrastructure // PC & Servers
News
10/16/2013
11:25 AM
50%
50%

No More Moore's Law?

For decades, Moore's Law has ruled the speed of technological development. Economics, cloud and application speed could usurp its position.

For decades, technologists have lived by the mantra of Moore’s Law. But cloud, faster technological advancement and economics are jeopardizing the principle's position.

Moore's Law is named after Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore, who described the trend in a 1965 paper that later appeared in Electronics magazine on April 19, 1965. Titled "Cramming more components onto integrated circuits," the article said:

The future of integrated electronics is the future of electronics itself. The advantages of integration will bring about a proliferation of electronics, pushing this science into many new areas.

Moore predicted that the number of microcomponents that could be placed in an integrated circuit (or microchip) of the lowest manufacturing cost was doubling every year and that this trend would likely continue into the future. This observation became an industry roadmap adopted by all major chip manufacturers across all ASIC streams. Unlike the rules of natural law, Moore's Law does not merely happen independently; rather, an entire industry works to make it happen and any period that meets the expectations set out by the law is considered a fairly good period.

Exponential Growth Problem

The new age economic boom can partly be attributed to the technological advancement heralded by faster processing and decreasing price. But just as all good things must come to an end, the party for integrated circuits may already be over, said Robert Colwell, director of the Microsystems Technology Office at the government’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Intel's chief chip architect from 1990 to 2001, and an Intel Fellow.

Read the rest of this article on Internet Evolution.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Server Market Splitsville
Server Market Splitsville
Just because the server market's in the doldrums doesn't mean innovation has ceased. Far from it -- server technology is enjoying the biggest renaissance since the dawn of x86 systems. But the primary driver is now service providers, not enterprises.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 14, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.