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2/8/2013
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Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype

More workers want a Windows tablet than want an iPad, Forrester Research says. This doesn't mean Surface Pro will realign the industry.

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8 Key Changes In Microsoft SharePoint 2013
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Headlines over the last week have been abuzz with claims that 200 million global workers are clamoring for a Windows 8 tablet, if not for a Surface Pro in particular. The figure is an extrapolation of data collected for Forrester's 2013 Mobile Workforce Adoption Trends, which surveyed almost 10,000 information workers in 16 countries and found that 32% of respondents want Windows running on their next work tablet.

The figure easily outpaces the proportion of people who said they want an iPad (26%) or an Android device (12%). It has prompted speculation that Microsoft is pushing enterprise mobility across a new Rubicon, one defined by not only touchscreens and thin form factors but also true multitasking, legacy application support and laptop-level computing power. Does this demand mean that Surface Pros will fly off the shelves when they go on sale this weekend, restoring Microsoft to its place atop OS world and erasing memories of the lackluster Surface RT launch?

Probably not.

To be clear, Surface Pro isn't likely to flop either. But there's little evidence that Redmond's new device will achieve more than a modest launch, let alone turn tides industry-wide. Notably, Forrester's numbers were collected in September and October -- before either Windows 8 or Surface RT were commercially available. Microsoft has since sold 60 million Windows 8 licenses but failed to galvanize Ultrabook sales or position its Surface RT as a BYOD favorite. Given these developments, it's conceivable that Forrester's respondents liked the concept of a Windows 8 tablet in theory but lost enthusiasm as they investigated actual options.

[ Are brick-and-mortar, branded stores key to Microsoft's fortune? Microsoft Woos Consumers With New Retail Plans. ]

In an interview, Forrester analyst Ted Schadler said it's possible demand for a Windows 8 tablet has declined and acknowledged that Surface Pro might not be the device survey respondents envisioned. He countered, however, that the "main point is that people thought and likely still think that Microsoft is a contender in tablets." This point is valid; Redmond certainly has the reputation and resources to inspire anticipation and confidence among would-be tablet buyers. The question, though, is whether Surface Pro will be the device that actually translates these sentiments into sales.

Forrester analyst Dave Johnson said in a phone conversation that the outcome is unclear. Since the firm conducted its study, "interest has muted a little bit," he stated, elaborating that that current Windows 8 hardware, including Surface Pro, has not satisfied the hopes of many potential purchasers.

Then again, iPads don't fully address user wants, either. Just as iOS has features that compensate for its shortcomings, Surface Pro likewise has the goods to win fans. In an interview, Gartner analyst Leslie Fiering said the device will play into "pent-up demand in the enterprise to extend the life of legacy systems while at the same time taking advantage of increased portability, multi-touch pen input and a more modern interface." She remarked that Surface Pro can run the full Office suite, which is unavailable for iOS and Android and available in only a limited version on Windows RT. Fiering also noted Surface Pro's appealing ability to integrate into existing IT architectures. Even so, she said the device faces challenges in conquering the enterprise simply because so many businesses are still amortizing their Windows 7 investments. "A lot of IT departments are exhausted from the Windows 7 migration," she stated. "They're not quite ready to do it again."

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AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/12/2013 | 2:34:51 PM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
The reports from the field are that the quantity available for sale at retail outlets was low. So, sell out was inevitable. Even the MS online store stopped selling them due to out of stock. That's pretty odd. Why not allow purchases but inform the buyer that it would be shipping at a later date? Apple does this.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/12/2013 | 2:31:27 PM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
You are really being obstinant when you "think" they are singling out your one and only requirement "Win8 Pro 64 bit". If in doubt, call them. I'm sure you'll find that I am right and you are, well, just plain wrong.

Solid Works 2013 will run on Win8, Win7, and Vista. You had three choices... as opposed to your position that you had only one. Like I said, if you don't like Win8 then don't run it. Don't act like a spoiled child that doesn't like his milk.

The last time I checked, the BIOS was on the M/B which by your info, was made around 2002. That's pre XP SP2 which is when DEP was introduced. btw - DEP is not exclusive to Microsoft. Linux and even the vaunted OS X uses it. I'm sure there's a hack around your problem but I'm done with you on this topic.

As in all things new, yes it will cost time and money for IT to upgrade to Win8 in the enterprise market. Nothing new here. Adoption by those with a need will come first. Same as it ever was. Not had a problem thus far with Win8 and printers. There are much better choices than HP by the way...

And, no, MS created Win8 as a way to unify the platform across devices... not splinter them as you suggest they should. Developers and users alike would agree with me on that. Just because you see a "touch" oriented interface on your desktop doesn't mean you can't click the old mouse on it. Pretty simple to operate.
moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Ninja
2/12/2013 | 2:56:23 AM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
And for the record, no, my Core 2 Duo was mfg in mid 2007, not 2002. Perhaps the old PC the guy at PC World was trying to upgrade was indeed that old. Yes, I know a 2007 PC is two generations old, but it runs fine. I just hate coughing up $75 to $135 for Windows 7 Pro when they had been offering Windows 8 for only $40.I wish it would have worked.
moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Ninja
2/12/2013 | 2:31:10 AM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
Nope, no cigar AustinIT. This is copied directly from HP's web site regarding the full-featured driver for the 7520 and Windows 8 Professional (64-bit) is not specifically listed (but other versions of Windows 8 are). Until I see it listed I'm not buying this printer. Hopefully they'll add it soon. And no, Windows 8 64 bit is not the same as Windows 8 Professional 64-bit. Would that full-featured driver work? If so, then why not list it as such when they go to such lengths to differentiate between all the other versions?

Finally, it isn't a question of me "liking" it. The REAL work software (now called cough, cough "legacy" by Microsoft) I'm needing to run (Solidworks 2013) only runs as supported on Windows 8 Professional, or Windows 7 Professional. I bought a new Dell. It came with Windows 8 on it. OK, so yeah, I'll use it, but it doesn't mean I'll ever "love" it. It's just going to be a nuisance more than anything else. Like I said, I can find no rationale for making desktop owners boot to a tablet or phone touch screen interface. Even Apple doesn't make their users do that (yet). Before Windows 8 sees much daylight in the corporate world, I expect most IT departments will be locking down that "fun" Metro interface one way or another - or sticking with Windows 7 as long as they can.

My interest in upgrading my old Core 2 Duo was in response to Microsoft's $40 XP upgrade campaign. And yes, I used their upgrade adviser tool and found that at least according to it, I should be able to run Windows 8, but only the 32 bit version. Well, that doesn't do me much good, so it is a moot point. In order to run the current version of Solidworks it was simply time to buy a new PC. But it seems foolish to throw out a perfectly serviceable machine, so come April 2014 it'll be getting Ubuntu.

And if you really are in IT, well, perhaps you can verify what I've read that because of the way Win 8 handles certain things, especially printers, that upgrading in a corporate setting is going to require a lot of work on the server end and of course more training of the IT staff. All those things cost money with comparatively small benefits in the corporate world.

Perhaps the uneasy truce between NT based Windows 2000 and Windows 98/Me that was XP finally reached a head here with Windows 8, and it is time for Microsoft to split their OS once again into TWO: One that is "cool" and "fun" for consumers and kids, and one "that lets you get work done" for the corporate world.

-----------------

Description:

The Full Feature Software and driver solution is the complete software solution intended for users who want more than just a basic driver.

IMPORTANT NOTES
For Windows XP Starter Edition, Windows Vista Starter Edition and Windows 7 Starter Edition
G㡠Is supported for USB only

If you only want the drivers (without the Full Software Suite), it is available as a separate download named "HP Photosmart Basic Print Driver".
Details and specifications
File name:
PS7520_1315.exe [1/1, 78.38M]
System requirements:No additional prerequisites
Released:2012-10-22
Version:28.8
Compatibility:Microsoft Windows Vista, Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium (32-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Home Basic (32-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Business (32-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate (32-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 (32-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Home Basic (32-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium (32-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Professional (32-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Enterprise (32-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate (32-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Home Basic (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Professional (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Enterprise (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 7 (64-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista (64-bit), Microsoft Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Windows Vista Enterprise (32-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Enterprise (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 8 (32-bit), Microsoft Windows 8 (64-bit), Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition, Microsoft Windows XP Media Center, Microsoft Windows Vista Home Basic (64-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium (64-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Business (64-bit), Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 8 Enterprise (32-bit), Microsoft Windows 8 Enterprise (64-bit), Microsoft Windows 8 Pro (32-bit), Microsoft Windows XP
Fix/Enhancement:Added support for Windows 8

Most current version of the software includes all previous fixes and enhancements
Bob Gill
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Bob Gill,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/12/2013 | 12:46:25 AM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
Rocky launch? They quickly sold all they had.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
2/12/2013 | 12:35:48 AM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
I find it disheartening that Surface Pro has had such a rocky launch. The idea of a tablet that doubles as a laptop is a good one.
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/12/2013 | 12:33:38 AM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
Really? So now the full story comes out that you're trying to put Win8 on a circa 2002 motherboard running a processor it was barely designed to handle? The Core 2 Duo supports DEP but good God the MB and BIOS sure won't. Try running the OS upgrade advisor next time BEFORE you waste everyone's time... including your own.

btw - don't need glasses. I'm looking at the HP website right now and it clearly lists the Win8 Pro 64bit driver. Take another... closer... look.

Microsoft isn't shoving anything down anyone's throat. Least of all you. Hey, if you don't like it then don't buy it.

Like you said, everyone's entitled to their opinion and now you have mine.

Oh, and if my wife had a sister, she would be gorgeous. Just sayin...
AustinIT
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AustinIT,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/11/2013 | 11:51:35 PM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
And you, my friend, are easily confused...
ANON1237925156805
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ANON1237925156805,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/11/2013 | 10:57:59 PM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
Point well taken, AustinIT about the importance of knowing about what you write. I think that moonwalk has defended him/herself ably on that front here though.

You have the deep expertise of an MCSE whose job it is to master the nooks and crannies of Microsoft's products. That specialization gives you a vantage point not shared by all technolgists. I'm betting that for you the more that's new and novel in a Microsoft release the more there is to learn/support/teach.

I and many others use the Microsoft environment simply for doing our work. Many of us are power users: It's our nature to poke under the hood and we want to be efficient and effective. So we've learned Microsoft products pretty well. But I'm not the only one who lacks the time and patience for relearning the UI almost from the ground up every time a new version comes out.

Microsoft understood the importance of business continuity for years while it was competing to keep us from the clutchs of OS/2 and wean us from WordPerfect, Lotus, Paradox, etc. They made sure that it was simple to migrate to Windows products and that upgrades were not too disruptive. They lost this focus at some point, maybe because they had a virtual monopoly worldwide and could take corporate users for granted. Whyever it is, since Vista for sure, they have moved from one experiment to the next making changes that often felt capricious and arbitrary. We can all cite examples. My two favorites are the revolutionary new Vista interface and the ribbons in MS Office.

Windows 8 seems to be the fundamental from the ground up rewrite we've all wanted so it's earned the right to some changes. It's solid under the hood, including the robust security that was lacking for so long. I get that it's critical that Microsoft move towards convergence between desktop and mobile. They've taken their best shot and there's clearly a lot to like about it. But no one should be surprised if the initial response is somewhat tepid.

The possiility of a converged experience between mobile devices and work desktop is not a major driver for people like me. We've lived quite well without it from the Palm PDA to the Blackberry to iPhone and now Android. We'll give a fair look at Windows phones when it's time to upgrade, but we're not going to ditch our iPhone/Android devices just because tiles have arrived at a store near us. Show us the apps and the ability to migrate data and we'll talk.

That means that for now the desktop migration has to be justifiable in its own right. Many of us are still in recovery from the migration to Win 7/Office 10. Win 7 is working well. Now we're being asked to migrate again. This time we can learn to love launching our applications from primary-colored tiles. Not to worry though; the desktop is only a click away. Never mind that once we make the click it'll feel a litte bit like Mars.

Even ignoring potential hardware issues, sorry but that dog won't hunt. This isn't a knock on Microsoft, it's economics and realism. For those buying new hardware at home, might as well learn Windows 8. For corporations ready to upgrade anyway or that care deeply about advanced security Win 8 makes a lot of sense. For the rest of us, I'm thinking that we'll see what doctors call watchful waiting.

In the meantime, Microsoft pay attention to these issues. They are not trivial, not when we support thousands of line workers and hundreds of power users. You may not be able to rework the standard desktop to work as it once did in your next upgrade of Win 8, but you can at least allow the user to make the desktop the default landing place.

And for Windows 9, surely already on the drawing board, remember that business continuity is at least as important as convergence.
moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Ninja
2/11/2013 | 8:24:29 PM
re: Surface Pro Demand: Don't Believe The Hype
OK, calm down Microsoft fan-boy. Everyone is entitled to their opinion whether you agree with them or not. First, I have better things to do with my time that wasting hours learing an infernal O/S that seems shorehorned into a desktop. There is NO objective reason for a desktop user to boot to a useless Gadgets screen. At least in Vista we could turn them off. And no, I didn't buy a touch screen with my desktop PC, and I don't WANT one. If I wanted a tablet I would have bought one. I'm using my desktop for WORK.

And I quote this from PC World, concerning DEP: "What appeared on the screen was a 0x0000005 error, followed by "Press CTRL-ALT-DEL to restart."

Of course, restarting did nothing but re-create the same error.

Diving into a Google search, I discovered that Windows 8 requires Data Execution Prevention (DEP), a feature of CPUs and motherboards that helps prevent malware or poorly designed applications from running program code out of parts of memory specifically allocated for data. The motherboard BIOS, in particular, must offer a DEP setting, which has to be enabled.

That's when I knew I was doomed.

The Abit IC7-G is a motherboard built by a defunct company, and it was already running the last available BIOS update. I verified the lack of a DEP setting. So it seemed as though this little project had come to a premature end." Similarly, DELL has not and will not offer a BIOS upgrade for my aging Core 2 Duo that includes DEP, so I'm screwed out of using Win 8 on it. (So, I'll put Ubuntu on it and use it for the Internet and Facebook).

Finally, you need some glasses. I too know how to use Google and upon visiting HP's OWN web site for the HP Photosmart 7520-e-all-in-one, you can in fact see a LOT of O/Ss there, and some Windows 8, and even Windows 8 Pro (32-bit), but NOT Windows 8 Professional (64-bit). It simply isn't there (yet). And I'm not talking about wanting some stripped down driver that offers simply printing functionality. Before I spend $$$ on a new printer I want the entire printer suite of applications to work. I mean, duh - THAT - is the whole rationale for getting a new printer compatible with Windows 8 Pro (64-bit) in the first place.

I hope Windows 8 succeeds.I hope the Windows tablets succeed and gives Apple a run for their money. And I like them including basic anti-virus (the new Windows Defender) and hope it keeps some of my cheap friends out of trouble. But the way Microsoft is shoving the Metro, er I mean "Modern UI", interface down everyone's throats is not a way to endear the new OS to everyone. Would you want to be forced to look at your wife's fat sister everytime you wanted to make love? Well, many of us who want to simply get work done do not want to be forced to look at a bunch of tiles first. It only serves to remind us everytime we boot up that Microsoft does not care about their customers but only cares about attempting to push us in their direction.

Finally, the "Crayola" colors of the Metro interface look gaudy (yep, that is a subjective opinion). Why not give people an option to tone those colors down a bit?
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