What Wasn't Said, And What Was - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
Infrastructure // PC & Servers
Commentary
7/11/2005
04:29 PM
David  DeJean
David DeJean
Commentary
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
Faster, More Effective Response With Threat Intelligence & Orchestration Playboo
Aug 31, 2017
Finding ways to increase speed, accuracy, and efficiency when responding to threats should be the ...Read More>>

What Wasn't Said, And What Was

Is Microsoft fiddling its Anti-Spyware product to give a free pass to adware from a company it intends to buy? Microsoft's "clarification" leaves two key points absolutely unclear, but we can draw some conclusions -- one because of what the company didn't say, and one because of what it did say. The "Response to questions about Claria software" posted on the Microsoft Web site on Friday and addressed to "

Is Microsoft fiddling its Anti-Spyware product to give a free pass to adware from a company it intends to buy? Microsoft's "clarification" leaves two key points absolutely unclear, but we can draw some conclusions -- one because of what the company didn't say, and one because of what it did say.

The "Response to questions about Claria software" posted on the Microsoft Web site on Friday and addressed to "Dear Customer" doesn't acknowledge with a single word a recent news story that reports that Microsoft is seeking to buy Claria, the adware company formerly known officially as Gator and unofficially by far less polite names. Obvious Conclusion No. 1: The story is true, and Microsoft is intent on becoming an adware company. The reason is said to be that it is intent on catching up with Google in the ad space. My grandmother would have said, "You cannot elevate your position by lowering your standards."What the customer letter did say was equally interesting. I quote:

"Today, anti-spyware vendors use different approaches, definitions, and types of criteria for identifying and categorizing spyware and other potentially unwanted software. This has limited the industry's ability to have a broad, coordinated impact in addressing the problem. That is a key reason Microsoft is a founding member of the Anti-Spyware Coalition, a group of technology companies and anti-spyware companies working alongside public interest groups to address key spyware issues."

Translation: "When it comes to adware, as with everything else, it's Microsoft's way or the highway. We'll decide what adware is and who has to suffer from it, and you'll like it."

This, Obvious Conclusion No. 2, is in line with the recent announcement that Microsoft will also soon begin to shove its proprietary anti-spam scheme, called Sender ID, down the computing community's throat, which I don't like either.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
IT Strategies to Conquer the Cloud
Chances are your organization is adopting cloud computing in one way or another -- or in multiple ways. Understanding the skills you need and how cloud affects IT operations and networking will help you adapt.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll