Infrastructure
News
2/26/2007
02:01 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Despite Fight With Hollywood, YouTube Prospers

YouTube steadily gained traffic during the month of February, as it did, more or less, throughout 2006.

Breathing new life into the old adage that there's no such thing as bad publicity, YouTube appears to be thriving despite the difficulty Google, its parent company, has been having with Hollywood.

Viacom's demand earlier this month that Google remove over 100,000 clips from YouTube was widely seen as a sign that Google's mission -- to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful -- had collided with Hollywood's crusade to control its film and video assets and to make them increasingly profitable.

The reported collapse of a deal to put CBS content on YouTube and the general dissatisfaction on the part of major media companies with Google's lack of progress in preventing unauthorized use of copyrighted content online have only heightened the impression that the marriage between the Internet and TV is on the rocks.

Against this bickering, however, YouTube's traffic continues to rise. In the two weeks following Viacom's takedown order -- the weeks ending Feb. 3 and Feb. 17 -- YouTube's U.S. market share of visitors increased by 13.9%, according to Internet metrics firm Hitwise.

Alexa.com, Amazon's Web traffic metrics service, also shows YouTube steadily gaining traffic over the month of February, as it did, more or less, throughout 2006.

Perhaps more ominously for the media companies negotiating with Google, YouTube's online traffic during the week of Feb. 3 surpassed the combined online traffic seen by 56 cable and broadcast television network Web sites.

"This is a landmark event in the changing face of Web traffic and entertainment consumption, now that entertainment seekers are more likely to go to YouTube than any other television network or gaming Web site," said LeeAnn Prescott, research director for Hitwise, on her company's blog.

Media companies may well have good reason to play coy with Google, but YouTube's relentless rise suggests that the difficulties of coming to terms now won't get any easier in the months ahead.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
2014 Next-Gen WAN Survey
2014 Next-Gen WAN Survey
While 68% say demand for WAN bandwidth will increase, just 15% are in the process of bringing new services or more capacity online now. For 26%, cost is the problem. Enter vendors from Aryaka to Cisco to Pertino, all looking to use cloud to transform how IT delivers wide-area connectivity.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - August 20, 2014
CIOs need people who know the ins and outs of cloud software stacks and security, and, most of all, can break through cultural resistance.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.