News
News
1/30/2005
11:56 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

DocuPen: A Scanner The Size Of A Toothbrush

The DocuPen is designed to scan 8.5" wide pages in black and white without any computer assistance. It connects to the PC via USB for download and for battery recharge. It can store about 100 monochrome pages before you have to dump its 2Mb flash memory to disk.

Picture this... You're sitting at lunch when your discussion unexpectedly turns to a new business venture, so you and your colleague start to scrawl notes on the napkin and your writing expands to the table top. You don't want to loose the inspiration, but you also don't relish carrying the table out of the restaurant. Rather than transcribing the notes, you roll your DocuPen across the napkin, then across the table top and leave a nice tip on your way out the door. Back at your office you plug the DocuPen into your PC and print a perfect copy of your inspired notes.

The DocuPen is an exercise in minimalism. The device is designed to scan 8.5" wide pages in black and white without any computer assistance. On top of that, it's ultimately portable. The unit I tested, the DocuPen R-700, connects to the PC via USB for download and for battery recharge. It can store about 100 monochrome pages before you have to dump its 2Mb flash memory to disk. That sounds like a lot of scanning when you don't have a document feed, but it beats trying to find a copy machine or worse, handwriting notes.

I was able to make clean scans using the DocuPen after only a few practice tries. The R-700 is an updated version of the scanner that has been improved by adding a second set of rollers and a rechargeable battery. The dual rollers help keep the scanner moving in a straight line, and the LED on top of the scanner let you know if you're moving the pen too fast for accurate scanning.

I scanned a variety of documents including standard office correspondence with black ink, magazine pages, a color photo, and several pages from a book. Since the DocuPen was designed for scanning individual pages of text, it performed best when put to that task. Color photos are converted to high contrast images, much as you might expect when attempting to send a color photo via fax. Magazine pages came through admirably as long as the text was printed in a dark color, and line diagrams looked great. I had trouble scanning pages from books when it wasn't possible to flatten the book's spine. With a normal flat-bed scanner, it's possible to scan a reasonable portion of the text that doesn't touch the scanner bed, but it was difficult to keep the DocuPen tracking straight across the curvature of an open book.

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.