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11/27/2006
04:31 PM
Steve Wylie
Steve Wylie
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Enterprise 2.0 Conference: What do you think?

Last week the Collaborative Technologies Conference officially became the Enterprise 2.0 Conference.  Changing a brand can be a difficult decision.  After all, we spend so much time and energy trying to build loyalty around brands.  CTC has a very strong community of people who identify with it and trust it, which is a difficult thing to achieve.  So why change it?

I guess the best way to answer that is to start by saying that "it" -- the Collaborative Technologies Conference -- really won't change, except in name. This is not about broadening the conference to be something we're not.  And it's definitively not an attempt to move away from the collaboration space.

Quite the opposite, in fact.  It's about changing our perspective on -- and being a better reflection of -- what we're all trying to achieve.  The goal is to build business systems that support greater agility.  It's about more effective communication and productivity in companies, large and small. Collaboration is the cornerstone of this goal, but it is not the end game.  We'll continue to focus the Enterprise 2.0 Conference on everything from large-scale enterprise application suites and communications infrastructure to lightweight web-based applications.  We will also continue to look at this from both technology and business perspectives and explore the changing work culture necessary to support it.

The Enterprise 2.0 Conference plays an important role in bringing this community together, defining the market and the language we use to describe it.  You've read my short explanation of Enterprise 2.0, so now, what's yours?  Let me know what you think at swylie@cmp.com, or using the comment section below.

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