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Exclusive Look At Legal Battle Over Major E-Health Records Project

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: How Productive Is E-Mail On An iPhone? A Day In The Life Of A Former CrackBerry Addict
2. Today's Top Story
    - Exclusive: Major E-Health Records Project Unravels Into Legal Battle
    - Consultant Sentenced To 5 Years In Prison For Stealing Customer Information
    - Ubuntu Linux's Achilles' Heel: It's Tough To Install On Laptops
3. Breaking News
    - Apple, Amazon, eBay, RIM, And Google Lauded For E-Commerce Innovation
    - Consumers: I Want My Net-TV
    - Microsoft Holds Firm On Xbox Pricing
    - Boeing Employee Charged With Stealing 320,000 Sensitive Files
    - Google, Skype Could Benefit If FCC Backs 'Openness" For 700 MHz Auction
    - Microsoft Making Xbox More Family Friendly
    - An Inside Look At The Fastest-Growing Company In Business Intelligence Software
    - Oracle Launches 11g Database With Nearly 500 New Features
    - When You Mix Firefox And IE, You Risk A Critical Zero-Day Flaw
    - Microsoft Denies Widespread Reports Of Xbox Disc Scratching
4. The Latest Apple Unvarnished Blog Posts
    - Introducing The "Apple Unvarnished" Blog
    - The First Eight Things I Did With My Neighbor's iPhone
5. Job Listings From TechCareers
6. White Papers
    - Eight Challenges Of Information Privacy And Security Law Facing The Fax Industry
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"You may be disappointed if you fail, but you are doomed if you don't try." -- Beverly Sills


1. Editor's Note: How Productive Is E-Mail On An iPhone? A Day In The Life Of A Former CrackBerry Addict

The only true measure of the iPhone's enterprise productivity capabilities is to go out and use the darned thing in the wild, wild world of work. So I did exactly that and compared it to how productive I would have been in the same situation with my BlackBerry.

For me to remain truly productive while out of the office (or at least not fall behind), I need access to my e-mail. Plain and simple. Here is a quick and basic rundown to see how each does at mobile e-mail.

BlackBerry: These little machines from Waterloo rock at e-mail. My BlackBerry delivered e-mail from my various accounts immediately and notified me with a little blinking red light. Messages are stored for 30 days, and you can perform searches to find that one e-mail from so-and-so or that one vital phone number from two weeks ago. The functionality of the BlackBerry e-mail system is robust, and the numbers of tasks you can perform are many. But it ain't pretty. The fonts are terrible, and the general appearance of your in-box is just unpleasant. No matter which way you format it, it looks like lines of code from your Commodore 64. Still, function beats form, and the usability is king. During trade shows or daily jaunts into NYC for meetings, I always remained on top of things. So, big thumbs up for my BlackBerry; it kept me in touch with the world.

iPhone: The iPhone is an entirely different experience. First, it doesn't deliver e-mails immediately. You can set it to check as often as every 15 minutes, but that's as close to real time as you get. It is compatible with most POP3 and IMAP e-mail systems, though I had trouble configuring a couple of my e-mail addresses. Setting up my Gmail account was a snap. Getting the iPhone to play nicely with full corporate e-mail systems won't be as easy, though it is possible.

There are several other issues that prevent the iPhone from being a strong e-mail device. Speed is No. 1. The e-mail client is just darned slow. Loading e-mails is painful. They always snapped right open on my BlackBerry. Of course, they look much better on the iPhone. Form beats function here. But that's not necessarily a good thing. The list of woes is long.

Read my blog post to learn more about the pros and cons of each device and why I think the BlackBerry still rules the mobile e-mail game. And look for my next blog post, where I'll compare the two devices on access to the Internet.

Eric Zeman
eric@zemanmedia.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Exclusive: Major E-Health Records Project Unravels Into Legal Battle
An ambitious e-health records project launched by an employer coalition that includes Wal-Mart, Intel, Pitney Bowes, Applied Materials, British Petroleum, and Cardinal Health is falling apart.

Related Stories:

Consultant Sentenced To 5 Years In Prison For Stealing Customer Information
A business software consultant who stole identifying information on 110,000 customers from an insurance company was caught trying to sell the information to an undercover Secret Service agent.

Ubuntu Linux's Achilles' Heel: It's Tough To Install On Laptops
The wildly popular Linux distro isn't all it's cracked up to be, especially if you try to install it on a laptop, our reviewer Alexander Wolfe finds. Come along on his Ubuntu safari, as he hacks his way through bug-fraught installation attempts.


3. Breaking News

Apple, Amazon, eBay, RIM, And Google Lauded For E-Commerce Innovation
The Software & Information Industry Association on Wednesday named the top 10 most significant developments in e-commerce over the past decade.

Consumers: I Want My Net-TV
By 2011, analysts predict shipments of network-equipped devices, PCs and home network bridges, and gateways will increase more than three times current levels.

Microsoft Holds Firm On Xbox Pricing
Analysts had predicted that Microsoft would use E3 in Los Angeles to announce a price reduction.

Boeing Employee Charged With Stealing 320,000 Sensitive Files
A quality assurance inspector faces 16 charges of computer trespass for allegedly loading sensitive data on his thumb drive and walking out with it over the course of more than two years.

Google, Skype Could Benefit If FCC Backs 'Openness" For 700 MHz Auction
"Openness" means a service provider won't be able to dictate which devices and services can be used on the network in the way cellular carriers currently do with their networks.

Microsoft Making Xbox More Family Friendly
E3 announcements of Disney movie downloads and new games aimed at families reflect Microsoft's strategy of broadening the Xbox 360's family appeal.

An Inside Look At The Fastest-Growing Company In Business Intelligence Software
With a new Silicon Valley office, a unique approach to BI, and a seasoned management team, QlikTech is planning an IPO next year.

Oracle Launches 11g Database With Nearly 500 New Features
The 11g database includes an advanced feature, Real Application Testing, that's expected to help customers migrate applications to the new database with less pain than previous migrations.

When You Mix Firefox And IE, You Risk A Critical Zero-Day Flaw
Researchers have differing views of whether Microsoft or Mozilla is responsible for a zero-day that needs both browsers to be installed to cause a problem.

Microsoft Denies Widespread Reports Of Xbox Disc Scratching
If a defect is identified, Microsoft claims it will repair consoles if necessary at no expense to the customers.

All Our Latest News

On the go?
See InformationWeek's daily breaking news on your mobile device, visit wap.informationweek.com and sign up for daily SMS notifications.


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Unified Communications
The concept has been the "next big thing" for a long time. But as with a lot of innovative technologies, time brings improvements in the products and the business benefits as well as some interesting new players. Learn how more than 300 companies are deploying unified communications and VoIP in this new report by InformationWeek Research.

Software As A Service
Is your organization considering software as a service? Learn about software delivery strategies from 250 business technology professionals in this new InformationWeek Research report. Use this report to understand how your peers are making SaaS part of their existing technology initiatives and what challenges they face.

-----------------------------------------


4. The Latest Apple Unvarnished Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/apple_unvarnished/index.html

Introducing The 'Apple Unvarnished' Blog
Apple is white hot. Mac sales are outstripping Windows at a time when rival Microsoft is stumbling with Vista. ITunes has roared into the marketplace to become the third-largest music retailer in the United States. And then there's this thing called the "iPhone" -- perhaps you've heard of it?

The First Eight Things I Did With My Neighbor's iPhone
Somehow, I utterly failed to snag an iPhone. On the fated date of June 29, I waited in line at several AT&T stores as well as one Apple store, but to no avail. While everyone else in the mobile blogosphere played with their iPhones, I waited and sulked with envy. In fact, I am still waiting. I have one on order and soon I will taste the sweet, sweet joys that come from owning the "it phone" of 2007. However, I did get my hands on one last night. So now I get to tell you about the first eight things I did with it.


5. Job Listings From TechCareers

Monsanto seeking IT Team Lead in St. Louis, MO

ITT Corporation seeking Manager, IT Business Systems in Fort Wayne, IN

University of Idaho seeking Server Systems Analyst in Moscow, ID

Monsanto seeking Application DBA in St. Louis, MO

Monsanto seeking Java Developer in St. Louis, MO

For more great jobs, career-related news, features and services, please visit CMP Media's TechCareers.


6. White Papers

Eight Challenges Of Information Privacy And Security Law Facing The Fax Industry
Sarbanes-Oxley, HIPAA, and Gramm-Leach-Bliley are three federal laws that require secure handling of information, either to keep it private or to make it available on demand. This paper will discuss each of these laws and the real impact they can have on fax management if information is mishandled.


7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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