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5/11/2007
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FBI Analyst Steals National Secrets

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Why Do Workers Steal Data?
2. Today's Top Story
    - The Ultimate Insider: FBI Analyst Steals National Secrets
3. Breaking News
    - Hitachi Ships Large, High-Performing Notebook Hard Drive
    - Real Crimes Against Children Reported In Second Life
    - IT Managers Have Green On Their Minds, But Not On The Books, Says Report
    - Encyclopedia Of Life Debuts
    - Jajah's Phone-On-A-PC Chip Technology Gets A $20 Million Boost
    - D'oh! Microsoft Unveils Simpsons-Themed Xbox
    - Intel Invests In Chinese Social Network, Five Other Companies
    - Study: 45% Of Workers Steal Data When Changing Jobs
    - Blue Chip Investors Line Up To Back Joost
    - Nortel Bets Big R&D Dollars On 'Hyperconnectivity'
4. The Latest Personal Tech Blog Posts
    - With Santa Rosa, Intel's Laptops Get Serious About Wireless
    - Mobile Ubuntu Linux Coming To A Smartphone Near You
    - Are You Ready For The $10-Multicore-Cell Phone Future?
    - 'Mob Rule' In Digg Case? Not.
5. Job Listings From TechCareers
6. White Papers
    - Using CRM Strategies To Incorporate Sales Best Practices
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote Of The Day:
"One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important." -- Bertrand Russell


1. Editor's Note: Why Do Workers Steal Data?

I was fascinated by Sharon Gaudin's recent article reporting that 45% of professionals steal data when they leave their jobs. I couldn't help wondering why they do it. A desire to suck up to their new supervisors? A sense of grievance against the company they're leaving? Or just because they can?

I'm afraid that I can understand the temptation in all three cases — especially No. 3. I once deleted spyware data that a particularly obnoxious boss left on my PC because I was insulted that it had been installed without my knowledge — and amazed at how badly it was hidden. It was a case — probably typical of the situation in many workplaces — where a badly implemented security system resulted in a system that was less, not more, secure.

In fact, a situation where employers and employees are in opposition to each other, rather than working together, is possibly one of the leading factors that can lead to data theft. At the end of the article, it's reported that "about 42% of respondents said their companies' security is non-existent, not strong enough, the wrong type, or too restrictive." It's likely that they had little to no input into the implementation of that security.

I'm certainly not arguing that nobody steals data from the workplace for financial gain or to get an "in" with a new company. (Or to foment a political coup.) But I would suspect, from what I've observed in my travels through the cubicles of various companies, that a lot of trouble could be avoided if employers invested in solid security products that prevented important company data from being unnecessarily copied — without making it so restrictive that employees can't do their jobs.

One way to help keep information in-house is to make it possible for employees to go home and not be expected to continue their employment there. According to a Dice poll, 38% of IT professionals say they are "doing work-related tasks all the time." I strongly suspect that they're trying to stay ahead in a very competitive work environment. In that kind of arena, the temptation to bring work home — in the form of documents that probably shouldn't be moved off the main server — can be nearly overwhelming. If workers feel encouraged to leave their work in the office, they'll leave the data in the office as well.

What do you think? Is it possible to keep data safe without keeping employees on a leash? Leave a comment at the InformationWeek Blog and let us know.

Barbara Krasnoff
bkrasnoff@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

The Ultimate Insider: FBI Analyst Steals National Secrets
In a case of espionage inside the White House, the technology that fed the plot also helped the government track down the conspirators and build a case against them.


3. Breaking News

Hitachi Ships Large, High-Performing Notebook Hard Drive
Despite its faster speed, the 2.5-inch drive offers comparable power consumption, heat emission, and acoustics to its 5,400-RPM counterpart.

Real Crimes Against Children Reported In Second Life
Linden Lab, the company that develops and operates Second Life, says it will work with authorities to help bring the virtual and real-life pedophiles to justice.

IT Managers Have Green On Their Minds, But Not On The Books, Says Report
Environmental factors are important, report shows, but only 25% of managers have written green criteria into their purchasing processes, largely because of a lack of soup-to-nuts product strategies.

Encyclopedia Of Life Debuts
The educational Web reference site is designed to document all 1.8 million species of plants and animals on the planet.

Jajah's Phone-On-A-PC Chip Technology Gets A $20 Million Boost
Intel Capital invests in the startup, which claims it has 2 million users of its existing service.

D'oh! Microsoft Unveils Simpsons-Themed Xbox
Fox movie studios will give away 100 limited-edition Simpsons Xboxes through a series of special events and promotions.

Intel Invests In Chinese Social Network, Five Other Companies
Three-fourths of Intel's investments in the first quarter of this year were in companies outside the United States.

Study: 45% Of Workers Steal Data When Changing Jobs
With data heading out the door over remote connections or on thumb drives tucked away in pockets or bags, nearly half of IT workers blame poor security.

Blue Chip Investors Line Up To Back Joost
The free TV service, which Joost bills as "the world's first broadcast-quality Internet television service," is positioned as a competitor to Google's YouTube.

Nortel Bets Big R&D Dollars On 'Hyperconnectivity'
No longer hitching its hopes on the anemic telecommunications market, the company is now investing a big chunk of its $1.7 billion annual research budget in new areas.

All Our Latest News

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4. The Latest Personal Tech Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/consumerpersonal_tech/index.html

With Santa Rosa, Intel's Laptops Get Serious About Wireless
Are you a desktop PC person, into having the highest performance hardware you can cram into a mini-tower? Then you're so yesterday, because Intel sees consumer laptops as the next big thing.

Mobile Ubuntu Linux Coming To A Smartphone Near You
After years of waiting for a successful mobile version of Linux, it looks like Linux is finally on its way to a cell phone near you thanks to some Ubuntu developers and Intel.

Are You Ready For The $10-Multicore-Cell Phone Future?
Last month Intel let slip a glimpse of its future when it announced a consortium of manufacturers that will develop a $500 device capable of accessing the Internet from anywhere.

'Mob Rule' In Digg Case? Not.
I'm no great fan of Digg. But the idea that Digg somehow caved in to pressure from a bunch of cyberdelinquents seems to me to be way off the mark.


5. Job Listings From TechCareers

Cisco seeking Product Mgr III in San Jose, CA

KPMG seeking Information Technology, Architecture Project Manager in Montvale, NJ

University of California Santa Cruz seeking IT Technical Lead in Santa Cruz, CA

Telerik Inc seeking Developer - Support - JavaScript / C# / VB.NET in Newton, MA

ITT Corporation seeking Senior Staff Engineer - Software in Fort Wayne, IN

For more great jobs, career-related news, features and services, please visit CMP Media's TechCareers.


6. White Papers

Using CRM Strategies To Incorporate Sales Best Practices
This brief outlines the surefire steps and tools to achieve measurable increases in revenue per sales rep.


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