Infrastructure
Commentary
7/5/2005
07:19 AM
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Feds And The Internet: If It's Not Broken, They'll Break It

If there's one thing you can count on the federal government getting wrong, it's how to handle the Internet. Last week's announcement that the feds will retain control of the domain system -- at the same time it was holding hearings into IP v6 problems -- prove that in spades.

If there's one thing you can count on the federal government getting wrong, it's how to handle the Internet. Last week's announcement that the feds will retain control of the domain system -- at the same time it was holding hearings into IP v6 problems -- prove that in spades.

Early in the week, a top official in the Commerce Department announced that the U.S. was going to keep its control over the Internet domain system and root servers. The reason wasn't made clear, but it's certainly in keeping with the current administration's go-it-alone attitude when it comes to international relations. After all, didn't one of our senators, Al Gore, invent the Internet? If so, don't we get to keep it all to ourselves?

Later in the week, Congress held a hearing into why the U.S. lags so far behind Asia in deploying IPv6. Reasons were a little hard to come by, but one thing was abundantly clear -- when it comes to deploying this next-generation protocol, we're getting our behinds kicked by Asian countries, whose governments are spending hundreds of billions of dollars to make sure they take advantage of the protocol.

The U.S., of course, is adverse to spending public money on advancing technology. After all, isn't that money supposed to be earmarked for subsidizing Big Agriculture, Big Oil, or some other very big private industry with Congress and the White House in its back pocket?

In both instances, we've got it all wrong. As the IPv6 hearings show, many parts in the rest of the world have it right when it comes to technology -- often, it needs a kickstart and help from public money, because development of technology is for the public good.

And because the rest of the world is catching up to us in technology, or in some instances surpassing us as the IPv6 hearings show, we need to have international cooperation when it comes to Internet control. That will only help us, because we'll be able to take advantage of the world's best minds, not just those in the U.S.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
2014 Next-Gen WAN Survey
2014 Next-Gen WAN Survey
While 68% say demand for WAN bandwidth will increase, just 15% are in the process of bringing new services or more capacity online now. For 26%, cost is the problem. Enter vendors from Aryaka to Cisco to Pertino, all looking to use cloud to transform how IT delivers wide-area connectivity.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Must Reads Oct. 21, 2014
InformationWeek's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of digital strategy. Learn why you should learn to embrace DevOps, how to avoid roadblocks for digital projects, what the five steps to API management are, and more.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
A roundup of the top stories and trends on InformationWeek.com
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.