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7/18/2005
09:34 AM
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Few Care About Mobile Video, Survey Finds

Only one in eight respondents said they have any interest, and most phone handsets can't receive it either.

Few mobile subscribers have any interest in receiving video on their phones, according to a survey released Monday by market research firm In-Stat.

Only one in eight respondents said they were interested in paying for mobile video, according to the survey. In addition, the handsets of two-thirds of the respondents aren't even capable of receiving mobile video, the survey found.

In addition, the customers that cellular operators covet the most -- satisfied customers that are least likely to switch carriers -- are least interested in mobile video, the survey found. However, the research firm found a silver lining for the mobile operators.

"Though mobile video does not yet appear to have widespread appeal, In-Stat believes that there is enough interest for it to generate some significant revenue for carriers in the near term," David Chamberlain, In-Stat senior analyst, said in a statement.

Overall, mobile video subscribers, which will reach slightly more than one million by the end of 2005, will increase to 30 million by 2010, the study predicted.

Mobile operators have touted mobile video as the wave of the future, introducing 3G-based services such as Verizon Wireless' V CAST.

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