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7/28/2006
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From Our Blog

Will You Join The DRM Dance?
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/2006/07/will_you_join_t.html

I'll apply any fixes/workarounds that break the digital rights management once I get Vista (will just using a non-Windows Media Player player work?). Not because I'm necessarily watching ill-gotten media, but because I don't accept Microsoft in this policing role. I don't pay for an operating system that (intentionally) makes life harder or more restrictive. -- Me


I'm not so sure this is an OS-specific problem--or that you should consider Windows Media Player part of the operating system any more than you should consider the game Free Cell part of it.

It just so happens that Microsoft packages non-OS-related products with Windows. There are other options, but most also have DRM built in.

Content providers make a decision regarding their use of DRM. It is optional. If they trust that you won't be giving their content away, then they may not use DRM.

Even the older versions of WMP had DRM functionality, as do WMP competitors like Real Media. The latest versions of WMP just extend that functionality.

The question you should be asking is if Microsoft should be packaging WMP with its OS to begin with. It has an advantage Real Media and Quicktime will never have, and its practices of including non-OS functionality with Windows discourages competition. That's the core of the problem. -- R. Lawson


Vista is going down the wrong path. Most of my digital content is either no longer available or not available in the United States. I've previewed films and music by downloading from the Net, but my extensive collection of purchased CDs and DVDs proves that I buy what I enjoy.

Vista and the police mentality aren't for me. Linux is becoming a better desktop operating system by the day. -- Jim K.

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